Perfect Edges

Decorating By Dacerra Updated 12 Sep 2009 , 6:02am by tonedna

Dacerra Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 12:32pm
post #1 of 11

Hello everyone,

I have been having trouble with tiered cakes. Especially wedding ones. I can not get the edges to be perfectly edged! My edges come out kinda rounded. What am I doing wrong? I have a smoother and I try so hard to sharpen the edges, but they just wont budge. When i bake my cake, I let it cool on a cake rack and then I apply a generous portion of buttercream. I then let that sit for a couple of hours and then apply my fondant. I have even tried applying the fondant immediately after. Should I be cutting the cake crust off? Do I need to freeze the cakes first? Please help! I'm at the point where I just want to give up!

Sincerely,

Daniela Acerra

10 replies
Babarooskie Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 12:55pm
post #2 of 11

I wish I can help you, but I have been having the same issues.
However, I believe that if you're going to apply Buttercream and then fondant over the cake, you should be crumb coating it...not applying a generous amount of Buttercream.

Try not putting so much Buttercream underneath the fondant and see how that works out- because remember, when you're smoothing out the fondant and if there's a thick layer of buttercream underneath- the buttercream will also "move" if you know what I mean.

I hope this makes sense...
Have a great day! icon_smile.gif

-K8memphis Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:10pm
post #3 of 11

Typically the point of using fondant is to have rounded edges.

I mean we make ourselves crazy trying to make buttercream look like fondant and trying to make fondant look like sharp edged buttercream.

Sure it can be done but why not use the correct medium for the job.

But all that to say, I would only try to get a sharp edge on my fondant on a room temperature cake. Cake Girls use dried fondant sheets to apply to a cake sculpture to make a box for example with very definite edges. Mike McCarry puts fondant over already fondanted areas in order to get a nice crisp edge like on his car dvd. Jennifer Dontz does it with fondant smoothers on her dvd.

Rylan Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:32pm
post #4 of 11

Start with a nice base with sharp edges. I suggest you try using ganache under fondant.

pattycakes55d Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 11:57pm
post #5 of 11

I was passing by and saw this thread. I'm having the same issues with square cakes. The ganache sounds good. Could you elaborate on the temp of the ganache, how you put it on and how long it takes to dry? Does that mean you eliminate the buttercream crumbcoat? I'm still a newbie with lots of questions. thanks.

sadsmile Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 12:10am
post #6 of 11

I just had a thought... What if we fake it???

Pipe a rail of RI around the top edge kind of the buttercream and let it harden for a few minutes and try that...???

Rylan Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 12:32am
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattycakes55d

I was passing by and saw this thread. I'm having the same issues with square cakes. The ganache sounds good. Could you elaborate on the temp of the ganache, how you put it on and how long it takes to dry? Does that mean you eliminate the buttercream crumbcoat? I'm still a newbie with lots of questions. thanks.




I let my cream boil for about a minute or so over low heat, turn the heat off and then throw my chocolate in. I stir it until everything is combined and then let it sit (I usually let it cool and then put it in the fridge so it sets faster).

Once it has set to peanut butter consistency, apply it to your cake just like you would with buttercream.

I personally prefer to put my ganache covered cakes in the fridge so it sets on the cake faster (it sets no longer than an hour). I don't know how long it would take on the counter.

No, I do not crumbcoat it with buttercream.

Evoir Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 12:53am
post #8 of 11

You can leave it out on the kitchen counter overnight to set/dry enough to then apply your fondant. I find I have fewer issues with fondant bubbling this way also.

Toptier Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 3:45am
post #9 of 11

I'm with Rylan, use ganache and also, in my experience, thin fondant...like 1/8", to achieve really sharp corners.

pattycakes55d Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 5:31am
post #10 of 11

that sounds really good. I guess you want to use a good chocolate - bittersweet?

tonedna Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 6:02am
post #11 of 11

I cant use chocolate with all customers, so I need to stay with buttercream. Refrigerating tha cake helps, and dont do fondant too thick.
Edna icon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%