Are Most Cakes Double Or Single Layer?

Decorating By cakefort Updated 11 Sep 2009 , 5:23pm by Win

cakefort Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:43am
post #1 of 21

Since Wilton pricing matrix is for double layers, am I to assume that most people make a double layer? Is that the standard or is it based more on asethetics of the cake and serving size?

20 replies
indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:49am
post #2 of 21

Round cakes I make 2-layer. Rectangle cakes (sheet cakes) are single layer. So far,all square cakes have been 2-layer.

catlharper Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:56am
post #3 of 21

Most of mine are two layer but I've made a few three layer as well.

crumbcake Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:04am
post #4 of 21

two layers! The more the better!

jclvs2 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:04am
post #5 of 21

indydebi,

Do you torte your sheet cakes? I have a 12x18 baking as I'm writing and was considering torting it but I have never torted this large before. Client did not ask for it to be torted either. Any advice is appreciated. TIA icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:13am
post #6 of 21

I don't tort unless it's specifically requested. Single layer, to me, means SINGLE layer ... one layer of cake.

madgeowens Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:23am
post #7 of 21

Excuse me for my ignorance, but..why would you torte a single layer sheet cake? I am not being flip, I want to know. TIA

jclvs2 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:32am
post #8 of 21

Thanks indydebi! I thought that also but needed to hear another opinion.

indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:33am
post #9 of 21

madge, I've seen grocery stores sell a torted single layer and have it labled as a 2-layer. icon_surprised.gif I'm wanting to scream in the bakery dept, "NO IT ISN'T!!! YOU'RE CHEATING THESE PEOPLE!"

jclvs2 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:35am
post #10 of 21

Madgeowens, The cake I am doing is a 1/2 sheet so I was unsure if I should torte or not. Just curious. icon_smile.gif

dstbni Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:41am
post #11 of 21

I recently torted a 1/2 sheet to add some extra height. I'm not sure I would do it again because it was a giant hassle, more frosting per piece though, which is always good icon_lol.gif

madgeowens Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:56am
post #12 of 21

THANKS........

SugarFrosted Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:17am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstbni

I recently torted a 1/2 sheet to add some extra height. I'm not sure I would do it again because it was a giant hassle, more frosting per piece though, which is always good icon_lol.gif




To make it a lot easier when you torte the 1/2 sheet cake, cut the top layer in half first. Much easier to handle. Fill the bottom part and then put the two halves of the top on separately.

Or you can bake two 9x13 quarter sheets so torting is much easier this way. After torting and filling put a bit of icing on the side of one of them, push them up against each other, then ice them together as a 13x18 half sheet. This way makes it easier to do a half chocolate/half vanilla cake too.

dstbni Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:20am
post #14 of 21

Thanks for the advice. I'll totally try that next time.

cakefort Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 11:26am
post #15 of 21

So then you actually make two batches of cake, for say, an 8 inch cake, not just one?

Also if you don't torte the sheetcake, then does that mean you don't fill it?

erinalicia Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 2:44pm
post #16 of 21

most cake recipes will make 2 8" layers that are between 1 1/2-2 inches tall... I don't know about the 3" pans.

a single cake mix makes 2 8" or 9" layers or a single 9X13.

edited to add.. if you're making a one layer sheet cake and you don't torte it then, no, you aren't filling it. You're getting a solid slab of cake with icing on top and sides.

cakefort Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:00pm
post #17 of 21

Oh, okay. So then 2 8" layers from a single recipe IS considered a double layer? Then a single layer is essentially half a standard recipe torted and filled?

erinalicia Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:09pm
post #18 of 21

I don't know why anyone would want a single 8" layer of cake. If you are making a 9X13 sheet then you need a full recipe of cake or a whole cake mix... it all depends on what you are making. It really isn't as difficult as you are trying to make it. A "layer" is one single cake baked in the pan. If you cut it in half horizontally that's torting it. If you stack 2 separate layers baked in 2 separate pans, then it's a 2 layer cake. "Torting" just means to split a layer horizontally.

If you read the recipe, it will tell you most times what the yield is or what size pans were used for that particular recipe. Torting isn't something that everyone does. I've torted a 2" 9X13 layer and filled it before, but only because a filling was requested. I'd much rather just make two cake layers and put the filling between them. If it's a fancier cake or I want more filling, I'll torte the 2 layers so that there are 3 layers of filling between the cake.

Win Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:11pm
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Excuse me for my ignorance, but..why would you torte a single layer sheet cake? I am not being flip, I want to know. TIA




I torte most of my single layer sheet cakes simply because I like the look --it makes them a little higher, giving me some more "canvas" on the side.. It's not a requirement by any sense.

The other day, I noticed the Wilton sheet pans all depict a torted sheet cake on their inserts, although it is multiple layers of cake and filling suggesting that it is two layers baked and torted.

cakefort Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:08pm
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by erinalicia

A "layer" is one single cake baked in the pan. If you cut it in half horizontally that's torting it. If you stack 2 separate layers baked in 2 separate pans, then it's a 2 layer cake. "Torting" just means to split a layer horizontally.




Okay. I know I'm not fully awake today, so bear with me icon_rolleyes.gif . Let's say you make a mix---1 box. The box says 12 servings. You bake it in either 2 8" (2inch high) pans or the entire mix in 1 8" (3inch high) pan. These are both still 1 box of mix. Are these both a single layer or a double layer?

If I drank coffee I'd get another cup--or 2. I"ll re-read this tomorrow and laugh at myself. Sorry to be so dense today!

Win Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:23pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefort

Quote:
Originally Posted by erinalicia

A "layer" is one single cake baked in the pan. If you cut it in half horizontally that's torting it. If you stack 2 separate layers baked in 2 separate pans, then it's a 2 layer cake. "Torting" just means to split a layer horizontally.



Okay. I know I'm not fully awake today, so bear with me icon_rolleyes.gif . Let's say you make a mix---1 box. The box says 12 servings. You bake it in either 2 8" (2inch high) pans or the entire mix in 1 8" (3inch high) pan. These are both still 1 box of mix. Are these both a single layer or a double layer?

If I drank coffee I'd get another cup--or 2. I"ll re-read this tomorrow and laugh at myself. Sorry to be so dense today!




If you bake in two 8" pans, each of those pans consist of one layer. If you fill in between those, you have a 2-layer cake. If[i] you chose to cut each 8" layer in half, fill in between each of those then you would have 4 layers of cake filled in between three times. It's still the same amount of cake, it just depends on how you want to present it.

Three inch pans require more batter than a single box of mix if it is unaltered, but often cut into (torted) into three one-inch layers with two layers of filling (cake, filling, cake filling, cake.) Again, it's the same amount of cake, just how you torte it.

HTH!

edited to add not sure when I hit italics, but no special emphasis is meant by that. icon_lol.gif

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