Contracts, Protecting Both Parties . .

Business By sugarsugargal Updated 9 Sep 2009 , 9:35pm by indydebi

sugarsugargal Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 9:51am
post #1 of 8

hi guys, my contract is a work in progress at mo . . .but it all seems to protect me ! how can i put it to a client that it is in her best interests too ?! . . . as far as i can see the relevant bits to the client are ...me agreeing to make the cake and the design specifics/delivery info etc but....thats about it ? the rest is about me . . anyone else got a different spin on how to explain the benefit of a contrac to a client ?...after all . . "its only cake . . ." icon_wink.gif

thanks icon_smile.gif x x

7 replies
indydebi Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 1:22pm
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarsugargal

after all . . "its only cake . . ." icon_wink.gif




I can't tell if you're saying that tongue-in-cheek or not, but if ANY part of you believes that, then you need to change what you believe. icon_smile.gif

Read my blog on "why a big contract? It's just a cake!" http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/contract

My contract is designed to protect me. And oh yeah by the way, there might be some good stuff in there for the client, too. This is why 2 parties who are entering into a contractual agreement have their own lawyers. My lawyer is paid to cover MY a$$.

If there weren' so many idiot brides/clients out there, we wouldn't need a contract at all. But I have to protect MY time and MY assets from those who whine that she deserves a full refund because the color didn't perfectly match the inside thread on the seam of the bridesmaids dress so her wedding was RUINED!

HamSquad Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 1:45pm
post #3 of 8

Great article Indydebi, so true, so true, my contract is 3 pages too, may need to add more to it since reading this. thumbs_up.gif
Hammy

sugarsugargal Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 8:03pm
post #4 of 8

indydebi . . .ah come ooooooooooooon of COURSE it was tongue in cheek, big style icon_wink.gif

sugarsugargal Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 8:06pm
post #5 of 8

...anyway...THATS what i mean, its all about me . . and i absolutely agree with the reasons why it has to be . . i have learnt a lot in my short time here ;0) . . but my original question was how to sell it to the bride, a contract is for both parties and i was trying to look for benefits to the client too, i guess i am kind of pre-empting the "this is a long document" convesation . . . anyone have any ideas on this ?

cylstrial Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 8:12pm
post #6 of 8

Do you have a website? Just put your contract on your website. Give your contract it's own little tab.

Then above the contract write whatever you want to say. Something like - All cakes, cupcakes, and cookies require a contract to protect the buyer and the baker.

If you do that, I don't think you'll have too many questions.

sugarsugargal Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 8:19pm
post #7 of 8

thats a good idea...will give that some consideration, thank you icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 9:35pm
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarsugargal

indydebi . . .ah come ooooooooooooon of COURSE it was tongue in cheek, big style icon_wink.gif



icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif I was pretty sure it was!!

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