Making Buttercream Roses

Decorating By mjk350 Updated 12 Sep 2009 , 3:42am by mjk350

mjk350 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 12:41am
post #1 of 26

Today I made Indydebis buttercream. When I went to make roses I get ragged edges and when I try to make the rose it is always falling over. Is there something I am doing wrong?

25 replies
TexasSugar Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 4:26am
post #2 of 26

Jagged edges can come from too dry icing, but can also come from piping really slow and turning the nail fast. If you aren't use to making roses, it is usually the piping/turning over too dry.

As for the falling over, are you making the bases thick enough?

Jeff_Arnett Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 4:43am
post #3 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Jagged edges can come from too dry icing, but can also come from piping really slow and turning the nail fast. If you aren't use to making roses, it is usually the piping/turning over too dry.

As for the falling over, are you making the bases thick enough?




This is the recipe I've always used to pipe buttercream roses and other flowers. No ragged edges and the flowers can be air dried for 2-3 days if desired...they can then be handled easily....even cascaded down the sides of the cake!

1 1/2 cup vegetable shortening [use a store brand WITH transfats]
1/2 cup plain flour
2 pounds sifted powdered sugar
1/3 cup near boiling water
1 teaspoon vanilla [you can leave it out...I don't usually add it]


Sift flour into powdered sugar then mix all ingredients on low until smooth, scraping bowl frequently. Allow the icing to sit a few hours to overnight before using.

mjk350 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 4:44am
post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Jagged edges can come from too dry icing, but can also come from piping really slow and turning the nail fast. If you aren't use to making roses, it is usually the piping/turning over too dry.

As for the falling over, are you making the bases thick enough?




Indydebi's buttercream says 1/3 to 1/2 cup of milk, I used 1/3 of milk because I thought I needed a stiffer buttercream for roses. Maybe I should be using more milk. I am using a number 12 tip for the base.

mjk350 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 1:47pm
post #5 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Jagged edges can come from too dry icing, but can also come from piping really slow and turning the nail fast. If you aren't use to making roses, it is usually the piping/turning over too dry.

As for the falling over, are you making the bases thick enough?



This is the recipe I've always used to pipe buttercream roses and other flowers. No ragged edges and the flowers can be air dried for 2-3 days if desired...they can then be handled easily....even cascaded down the sides of the cake!

1 1/2 cup vegetable shortening [use a store brand WITH transfats]
1/2 cup plain flour
2 pounds sifted powdered sugar
1/3 cup near boiling water
1 teaspoon vanilla [you can leave it out...I don't usually add it]


Sift flour into powdered sugar then mix all ingredients on low until smooth, scraping bowl frequently. Allow the icing to sit a few hours to overnight before using.




Thanks so much telling me about this recipe. I will definetly try it. How long does it keep and does it need to be kept refridgerated?

Jeff_Arnett Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 4:20pm
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Quote:


Thanks so much telling me about this recipe. I will definetly try it. How long does it keep and does it need to be kept refridgerated?




No refrigeration needed.....will keep at least a month at room temperature in a sealed container....just stir well before using.

TexasSugar Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 8:15pm
post #7 of 26

I usually use the Wilton buttercream for roses so I use about 1/4th cup of water for 2lbs of sugar (and two cups of crisco). I know her measurements are a little different, so you will probably have to play with it a bit or PM her and ask her what she does.

If your bases are thick enough and are not too tall and you are having problems with them moving around it is probably too soft icing. Take a little bit of it and add a little bit of powder sugar.

For me the perfect rose consistancy is an icing that you can take and roll up in a ball with your fingers. When you get it in a ball if you can touch it and it feels slightly sticky, with out actually coming off on your finger it works great for roses. If it doesn't stick to your finger at all, then chances are the petals are not going to stick to the base. If it isn't sticky then I add a bit of crisco or piping gel. For the Crisco it is about a tablespoon per cup of icing and the piping gel is about a teaspoon per cup of icing. If the icing is very sticky and comes off on your finger you are touching it with, then it is too soft and you want to add some powder sugar.

tracienvegas Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 8:27pm
post #8 of 26

It's been 110 degrees here lately, so I have all my Wilton students use a Hershey's kiss for the base instead of the tip 12 icing mound. The kiss work the same, but is much more stable. When it's this hot out, the roses always tip, no matter how well you make the base. Besides making the rose more stable, it's much easier to get off the wax paper or nail and gives a little extra treat when someone easts the rose.

notjustcakes Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 9:58pm
post #9 of 26

I stopped doing buttercrem roses and started doing roses from chocolate plastic....It is so much easier to work with and they hold up better and look more realistic.....I don't think I'll ever go back to the buttercream...I learned the method in the book "Wedding Cakes you Can Make!"...Very easy....

mjk350 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 10:01pm
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by notjustcakes

I stopped doing buttercrem roses and started doing roses from chocolate plastic....It is so much easier to work with and they hold up better and look more realistic.....I don't think I'll ever go back to the buttercream...I learned the method in the book "Wedding Cakes you Can Make!"...Very easy....




I never heard of chocolate plastic. Could you please explain what it is?

Jeff_Arnett Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 1:19am
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by notjustcakes

I stopped doing buttercrem roses and started doing roses from chocolate plastic....It is so much easier to work with and they hold up better and look more realistic.....I don't think I'll ever go back to the buttercream...I learned the method in the book "Wedding Cakes you Can Make!"...Very easy....



I never heard of chocolate plastic. Could you please explain what it is?




It's a mixture of chocolate and glucose or corn syrup....becomes pliable and easy to shape.

Google modeling chocolate or chocolate plastic and you should find the recipe.

mjk350 Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 1:23am
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by notjustcakes

I stopped doing buttercrem roses and started doing roses from chocolate plastic....It is so much easier to work with and they hold up better and look more realistic.....I don't think I'll ever go back to the buttercream...I learned the method in the book "Wedding Cakes you Can Make!"...Very easy....



I never heard of chocolate plastic. Could you please explain what it is?



It's a mixture of chocolate and glucose or corn syrup....becomes pliable and easy to shape.

Google modeling chocolate or chocolate plastic and you should find the recipe.





Thanks so much. I will check it out. It sounds interesting. icon_smile.gif

mjk350 Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 1:31am
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracienvegas

It's been 110 degrees here lately, so I have all my Wilton students use a Hershey's kiss for the base instead of the tip 12 icing mound. The kiss work the same, but is much more stable. When it's this hot out, the roses always tip, no matter how well you make the base. Besides making the rose more stable, it's much easier to get off the wax paper or nail and gives a little extra treat when someone easts the rose.




Thanks for the tip about using the Hershey's kiss. I will give that a try also. I love trying new ideas. icon_smile.gif

mjk350 Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 1:43am
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

I usually use the Wilton buttercream for roses so I use about 1/4th cup of water for 2lbs of sugar (and two cups of crisco). I know her measurements are a little different, so you will probably have to play with it a bit or PM her and ask her what she does.

If your bases are thick enough and are not too tall and you are having problems with them moving around it is probably too soft icing. Take a little bit of it and add a little bit of powder sugar.

For me the perfect rose consistancy is an icing that you can take and roll up in a ball with your fingers. When you get it in a ball if you can touch it and it feels slightly sticky, with out actually coming off on your finger it works great for roses. If it doesn't stick to your finger at all, then chances are the petals are not going to stick to the base. If it isn't sticky then I add a bit of crisco or piping gel. For the Crisco it is about a tablespoon per cup of icing and the piping gel is about a teaspoon per cup of icing. If the icing is very sticky and comes off on your finger you are touching it with, then it is too soft and you want to add some powder sugar.




Thanks very much for the information about the consistancy. That is good to know. icon_smile.gif

aquamom Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 2:04am
post #15 of 26

Tracyinvegas--thanks so much about the Hershey's kiss. I have to try that. I have yet to make a rose that I am happy with. All these tips are just wonderful!!

Joyfull4444 Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 2:16pm
post #16 of 26

Not that I'm much help, but I just did a requested all buttercream rose cake for a young girls 6th BD. Haven't piped a rose since my classes a few years back either.
I found after a couple tries with the recommended tip 12, that the coupler itself, no tip added, gave me a much sturdier base to work with. I also froze the roses for about an hour and a half before placing them on the cake too.
Its the first cake in my photo's if you care to look.

mjk350 Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 2:57am
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joyfull4444

Not that I'm much help, but I just did a requested all buttercream rose cake for a young girls 6th BD. Haven't piped a rose since my classes a few years back either.
I found after a couple tries with the recommended tip 12, that the coupler itself, no tip added, gave me a much sturdier base to work with. I also froze the roses for about an hour and a half before placing them on the cake too.
Its the first cake in my photo's if you care to look.




Thanks for the information about using the coupler with no tip added to make a sturdier base and freezing the roses. icon_smile.gif

littlecake Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 3:06am
post #18 of 26




i love making buttercream roses....use a stick like in the above you tube video

madgeowens Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 3:24am
post #19 of 26

search on you tube for cake decoratign and bc roses and there are many videos demonstrating making roses.....I did not find making them on a stick useful. someone said to add a little bit of corn syrup to get rid of cracked edges...mine do that and I decided roses look like that more than not haha

MissCathcart Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 3:24am
post #20 of 26

I love reading tips. It's always an education.

mjk350 Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 4:03pm
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Jagged edges can come from too dry icing, but can also come from piping really slow and turning the nail fast. If you aren't use to making roses, it is usually the piping/turning over too dry.

As for the falling over, are you making the bases thick enough?



This is the recipe I've always used to pipe buttercream roses and other flowers. No ragged edges and the flowers can be air dried for 2-3 days if desired...they can then be handled easily....even cascaded down the sides of the cake!

1 1/2 cup vegetable shortening [use a store brand WITH transfats]
1/2 cup plain flour
2 pounds sifted powdered sugar
1/3 cup near boiling water
1 teaspoon vanilla [you can leave it out...I don't usually add it]


Sift flour into powdered sugar then mix all ingredients on low until smooth, scraping bowl frequently. Allow the icing to sit a few hours to overnight before using.





This morning I made your recipe for buttercream. I was wondering how long you let it mix for in the mixer? Is it supposed to be on the very stiff consistensy or do I have to add more liquid? I have a KA and used number 4 speed. Now have to wait till later to try the rose.

MissCathcart Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:26am
post #22 of 26

I want to know too.

Tarielena Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 3:53pm
post #23 of 26

The bakery I used to work at had a very easy way of doing BC roses. Leave some mini marshmallows out overnight, or until they are a bit firm, but not totally dried out. Then take a toothpick, stick the marshmallow on one end, hold the other end and use the marshmallow as your "base." When your rose is done you can use scissors to come up underneath the rose and lift it off. Or, for later use, have a piece of Styrofoam handy simply stick the free end of the toothpick in and allow the roses to dry out.

VERY fast and easy!

mjk350 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 4:28pm
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarielena

The bakery I used to work at had a very easy way of doing BC roses. Leave some mini marshmallows out overnight, or until they are a bit firm, but not totally dried out. Then take a toothpick, stick the marshmallow on one end, hold the other end and use the marshmallow as your "base." When your rose is done you can use scissors to come up underneath the rose and lift it off. Or, for later use, have a piece of Styrofoam handy simply stick the free end of the toothpick in and allow the roses to dry out.

VERY fast and easy!




Thanks for this tip. I will definitly give it a try. I would think a toothpick would make it top heavy and not hold the petals on. It does sound amazing that it works. I get the hang of doing the petals but still get jagged edges. I read about using karo corn syrup but do not know how much to add.

Tarielena Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 2:30am
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarielena

The bakery I used to work at had a very easy way of doing BC roses. Leave some mini marshmallows out overnight, or until they are a bit firm, but not totally dried out. Then take a toothpick, stick the marshmallow on one end, hold the other end and use the marshmallow as your "base." When your rose is done you can use scissors to come up underneath the rose and lift it off. Or, for later use, have a piece of Styrofoam handy simply stick the free end of the toothpick in and allow the roses to dry out.

VERY fast and easy!



Thanks for this tip. I will definitly give it a try. I would think a toothpick would make it top heavy and not hold the petals on. It does sound amazing that it works. I get the hang of doing the petals but still get jagged edges. I read about using karo corn syrup but do not know how much to add.




I didn't ever make super huge BC roses, but I never had problems with the petals sticking. If you make larger roses you could always try using a regular size marshmallow!

mjk350 Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 3:42am
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarielena

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarielena

The bakery I used to work at had a very easy way of doing BC roses. Leave some mini marshmallows out overnight, or until they are a bit firm, but not totally dried out. Then take a toothpick, stick the marshmallow on one end, hold the other end and use the marshmallow as your "base." When your rose is done you can use scissors to come up underneath the rose and lift it off. Or, for later use, have a piece of Styrofoam handy simply stick the free end of the toothpick in and allow the roses to dry out.

VERY fast and easy!



Thanks for this tip. I will definitly give it a try. I would think a toothpick would make it top heavy and not hold the petals on. It does sound amazing that it works. I get the hang of doing the petals but still get jagged edges. I read about using karo corn syrup but do not know how much to add.



I didn't ever make super huge BC roses, but I never had problems with the petals sticking. If you make larger roses you could always try using a regular size marshmallow!




Thanks so much. I will try it out. icon_smile.gif

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