Baking Cakes In Ball Shaped Pans

Decorating By Sweet_Treats_1 Updated 6 Sep 2009 , 1:25am by ceshell

Sweet_Treats_1 Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 2:42am
post #1 of 21

Does anyone have any tips on how to bake a cake in a deep round pan that cooks in the center and does not burn on the outer edges. I had to make a pregnant belly cake for my sis n law baby shower. I used the soccer ball pan to make the belly. The cake took forever to bake 1 1/2 hour. The edges were so hard and crusty that it was hard to actually cut with a butcher knife, but the inside near the middle was still undercooked. I was also not sure how much batter to use but I filled it up halfway and rose to almost overflowing, and then the belly dropped so it looked more like a turtle instead of a pregnant belly. PLEASE HELP SOMEONE

20 replies
tanyascakes Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 2:57am
post #2 of 21

I generally do my ball pans at 325 degrees and cook for about 10-15 minutes longer than stated. For the soccer ball, I inserted a flower nail coated just like the pan and then added the batter. Cooked just fine following the pans directions. Sorry that is all the help I have for you!! HTH!!!

tatorchip Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 2:58am
post #3 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyascakes

I generally do my ball pans at 325 degrees and cook for about 10-15 minutes longer than stated. For the soccer ball, I inserted a flower nail coated just like the pan and then added the batter. Cooked just fine following the pans directions. Sorry that is all the help I have for you!! HTH!!!


I agree, that is what I use.

SugarFrosted Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 3:08am
post #4 of 21

When I have used the sports ball pan or any of the other domed pans, I have used a flower nail in the bottom, plus bake-even strips AND an aluminum foil "heat shield" with a 2-3" hole in the center.

Before ever putting the batter into the pan, prepare the heat shield by folding a length of aluminum foil in half, so that it is wide enough to completely cover the opening of the pan plus at least an inch extra all around. Fold it in half again and cut a 1-1 1/2" half circle out of the center. when you open the fold again, it will be a full circle cut out. The hole is to allow steam to escape during baking, and to allow you to test for doneness. Lay it aside till needed.

Bake the cake as usual, but reduce the temp to 325F. It may take longer to bake, but it will be less likely to burn on the edges. When the edges first start to look done, open the oven door and quickly lay the heat shield over the top of the pan, bending the corners down so it stays in place. Bake as long as necessary to be sure the center is done.

When the cake is done, let it cool for 10 minutes, and then level the top while still in the pan. (At this point, MY personal method is to flip the cake onto a papertowel covered rack, and cover the top of the cake with a piece of plastic wrap. Place the dome pan back over the plastic wrap. This allows the cake to cool slowly without losing all its moisture. A number of people disagree with the plastic wrap method, but it works for me, and for many others.) Allow the cake to cool completely in whatever manner you choose.

GenGen Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 3:25am
post #5 of 21

i found a really nice home made baking core for pans like that. take a tomatoe past can. cut both ends off and remove the paper label.. then use Pam with flour and coat both inside and out.. makes a Wonderful baking core. i also use this method for other pans too only i use larger cans.

tatorchip Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 4:26am
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by GenGen

i found a really nice home made baking core for pans like that. take a tomatoe past can. cut both ends off and remove the paper label.. then use Pam with flour and coat both inside and out.. makes a Wonderful baking core. i also use this method for other pans too only i use larger cans.


great idea GenGen, save money and recycle, can't beat that deal love it, thanks

Sweet_Treats_1 Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 4:37am
post #7 of 21

Thanks for all of the ideas. I hate to sound naive, but does it matter how I put the nail in the pan or how do I keep it from falling over once I pour in the batter, or does it matter? GenGen,how do I take the can out after the cake has finished baking with out tearing up the cake?

tatorchip Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 4:39am
post #8 of 21

GenGen, I started another thread for recycling ideas, I hope you don't mind that I used your idea and gave you credit of couse. Thanks again

GenGen Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 5:35am
post #9 of 21

lol no problem i love to share good ideas.. i forgot to mention that sometimes with the can used as a heating core i sometimes have to weight it down, an oven save plate works perfect. if you spray the can inside and out with Pam with flour you just wiggle the can loose and remove.it comes out much like the cake does from the pan, easy peasy nice and easy icon_smile.gif

Tator i started using the can as a heating core in my early days of hobby baking when i needed something that functioned as a heating core but wasn't shaped like the typical ones used for 3D pans etc.. i have so much trouble trying to use those in non 3D pans.

the other good thing about using cans as heating cores is you can use as many as needed. and once its iced the icing holds the cake "core" in place.

be on the look out though when handling the cake aka manuevering it this cake core IS loose from the rest of the cake.

i sometimes like to ice it in place and freeze the cake so its handle-able (is that a word?Lol)

tatorchip Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 11:34am
post #10 of 21

GenGen everything is a word if it gets the point across lol
thanks for advise, I quess my idea about recycling was a flop lol
no body shared as of yet, oh well we will share as we go alone lol

Sweet_Treats_1 Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 3:31pm
post #11 of 21

Thanks GenGen,
I'am "Bravely" going to try the tomato can just on a test cake to see if I can get the hang of it.

Tatorchip,
I too think this is a great recycling idea!

GenGen Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 6:16pm
post #12 of 21

don't forget to spray the can (or whatever you use to grease your regular cake pans with) outside AND inside. most times it doesn't stick but like any cake pan's history there are exceptions lol. most times you wont have to worry about how to remove the can just slide it on out. just remember it may need weighed down with an oven safe plate or something.

the bigger the cake pan the bigger the can i use or, the more cans i use. hope it works out for you!

Marniela Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 6:38pm
post #13 of 21

I have had the same problem with burnt edges and raw middles. After many cakes being thrown out, I found that it was my recipe. For some reason I couldn't get a scratch recipe to turn out, but the mix ones are fine--even doctored ones like the WASC. I don't use a heating core, and drop my oven temp down to 300 degrees. Takes a while but at least at the end it is cooked evenly icon_smile.gif

Sweet_Treats_1 Posted 4 Sep 2009 , 11:22pm
post #14 of 21

Thanks everyone!

MissCathcart Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:05am
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Quote:

When the cake is done, let it cool for 10 minutes, and then level the top while still in the pan. (At this point, MY personal method is to flip the cake onto a papertowel covered rack, and cover the top of the cake with a piece of plastic wrap. Place the dome pan back over the plastic wrap. This allows the cake to cool slowly without losing all its moisture. A number of people disagree with the plastic wrap method, but it works for me, and for many others.)




I do almost the same thing SugarFrosted. Take my cakes out, let cool for just 5 minutes, take them out of the pans, and immediately cover with plastic wrap while still quite hot. Let them cool down a bit, then it's off to the freezer. I've never had a dry cake, and am complimented on the moistness. Got this tip from Scott Clark Woolley's book.

FlourPots Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:14am
post #16 of 21

I can't stand the soccer ball pan. It took me a few tries and some tips from CC members to get a decent result.

I now use 2 nails, homemade bake-even strips, a water filled pan below (as if baking a cheesecake), and I only fill with batter half-way.

mwest110 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:29am
post #17 of 21

I'm baking one as I type. I'm just using a Pyrex bowl at 325 and check every 5 minutes after 40 minute mark. I'm trying to use what I have so I don't have to purchase so many bowls since I'm just getting started.

pattycakesnj Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:51am
post #18 of 21

I always bake at 320 and never had a problem with the ball pan or any of the other deep funny shaped pans

ceshell Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 4:36am
post #19 of 21

Question for the can users, don't the tomato-paste cans have a plastic lining on the inside which renders them unsafe for use in the oven? This is a question, not a statement of fact! I was reading the "baking in a can" thread about a week ago and that subject was raised. Just thought I'd mention it here. thumbs_up.gif

GenGen Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 12:55am
post #20 of 21

some do some dont. most of them you can tell. mine don't seem to have it. i'll take a look at some cans to see what your talking about. I don't want to promote something that may cause harm

ceshell Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 1:25am
post #21 of 21

Thanks - I have been meaning to look that info up myself, because I sure do like the idea of using the can as a core or even as a baking vessel. I think I first came across that concept when I was researching something entirely different - which was about whether or not can metals/aluminum leached into your food if the can contained something acidic...and I could have sworn I read that acidic foods would actually make a metal can deteriorate on your shelf, and so if the can contains an acidic food like tomatoes...it's lined (thus that is why can metals don't leach into acidic foods). I don't think the can interior has to be white in order to be lined.

Speculation and heresay, but worth investigating, that's for sure.

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