10X Icing Sugar In Canada??

Decorating By sugarprincess Updated 3 Sep 2009 , 11:48am by 3GCakes

sugarprincess Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 12:38am
post #1 of 10

I am from Ontario, Canada and the icing sugar I buy is RedPath but I cannot see 10X on the package anywhere?

Are there any other people here from Canada and what brand of icing sugar do you buy? I can't seem to find any other brand but Redpath.

Thank-you

9 replies
CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 12:44am
post #2 of 10

For the most part, I think RedPath is the only 'brand name' available for us (except the no name brand, which is probably just RedPath bagged differently).

I`d like to know this, too.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 12:55am
post #3 of 10

Hey there! I'm in Canada too. I use the Redpath brand as well and it works great. I have no idea what the 10x means, but would like to know. Thanks!

HeatherWantsCake Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 12:58am
post #4 of 10

I've found something called "Sweet Source 100% cane sugar" icing sugar at Superstore recently. Otherwise all I've seen is Redpath, too. This doesn't say 10x on it anywhere, but looks a little finer than Redpath, maybe.

Edited to add: I Googled. 10 x sugar just refers to the number of times the sugar has been processed (or something like that) and is just another name for icing sugar or confectioners sugar or powdered sugar. So, we're good, even if we're stuck with limited choices. icon_smile.gif

3GCakes Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 1:08am
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherWantsCake

I've found something called "Sweet Source 100% cane sugar" icing sugar at Superstore recently. Otherwise all I've seen is Redpath, too. This doesn't say 10x on it anywhere, but looks a little finer than Redpath, maybe.

Edited to add: I Googled. 10 x sugar just refers to the number of times the sugar has been processed (or something like that) and is just another name for icing sugar or confectioners sugar or powdered sugar. So, we're good, even if we're stuck with limited choices. icon_smile.gif




It's the number of times it's been sifted. You can always sift it more, if you want....but unless the package has been opened, you probably don't need to.

sugarprincess Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 1:17am
post #6 of 10

Thanks,

The only reason I was wondering about this is because I find that my buttercream icing is slightly grainy and not completely smooth. I usually use a combination of butter and regular crisco shortening. I wonder if I use just butter if it will come out smoother. I haven't been able to find high ratio shortening except at the bulk barn and I have no idea what brand it is. So frustrating!!!! All I want is smooth buttercream icing!!!
(I have already tried smbc and I really don't like the taste - way to buttery.)

You guys are so lucky south of the border. So many different cake decorating suppliers. I'm jealous!! icon_biggrin.gif

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 1:25am
post #7 of 10

I'm so jealous too, I wish I lived in the States! Anyway, my buttercream was slightly grainy too (a fine crunch sensation when eating), then I stopped using meringue powder in it. Do you use that? I started using Sharon's recipe with the coffee whitener instead and it's a lot nicer.

sugarprincess Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 2:07am
post #8 of 10

Yes, I usually do use meringue powder. I didn't think that would cause it to taste grainy. Maybe I will try a small batch of icing without it. I just hate to do all this trial and error and waste my ingredients, especially the unsalted butter. (although Fortinos had unsalted butter on sale for $2.99 a pound - bought myself 20 pounds, wrapped it in foil and froze it for future use)

I haven't tried the icing recipe with the coffee creamer. Maybe I will give it a try.

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 2:21am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes


It's the number of times it's been sifted. You can always sift it more, if you want....but unless the package has been opened, you probably don't need to.




No, not sifted--GROUND. Sifting doesn't alter the size/fineness of the granules/crystals, but grinding does. 6x is ground six times from raw. 10x is ground 10 times from raw.

The coarseness of the grind is given by the numbers, such as 10x for the finest, and 6x for standard.

Rae

3GCakes Posted 3 Sep 2009 , 11:48am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3GCakes


It's the number of times it's been sifted. You can always sift it more, if you want....but unless the package has been opened, you probably don't need to.



No, not sifted--GROUND. Sifting doesn't alter the size/fineness of the granules/crystals, but grinding does. 6x is ground six times from raw. 10x is ground 10 times from raw.

The coarseness of the grind is given by the numbers, such as 10x for the finest, and 6x for standard.

Rae




Ah! You learn something new every day! Thanks Blakescakes!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%