Quetsion On Tiered Cakes

Decorating By Barb1959 Updated 24 Sep 2009 , 10:13am by Barb1959

Barb1959 Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 5:08pm
post #1 of 19

I am helping my daughter do a cake for a baptism. It's going to be 3 tiered, 6 / 8 /12. We originally told the customer (a friend) that we would put a fillng between the layers of each tier (actually would be 6 pieces of cake). My daughter says that you cannot fill a cake that large because the tiers layers will slide. We have been experimenting with some cakes and the the layers are sliding. And this is with just the 8" by itself. Is it true that generall speaking you do not fill large tiered cakes.

18 replies
dnrlee Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 5:14pm
post #2 of 19

Are you damming the filling? Are you using too much filling?

cylstrial Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 5:25pm
post #3 of 19

I fill every layer of every cake. What are you filling it with? A fruit filling?

prterrell Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:14pm
post #4 of 19

Cake with no filling? Yuck! You need at least icing between the layers! Make sure you have a good, stiff dam, and don't put in too much filling: 1/4" max! Thick fillings are best. For perishible fillings where I'm gonna have to refrgerate the cake anyway, I like to make the dam, add the filling, and then set it in the fridge for about 15 minutes, then add the top layer, then back in the fridge for an hour before icing. Really helps to give the cake time to settle and the filling and dam to set before icing. Once iced, back it goes in the fridge before deco and then store in fridge before travel and assembly on-site.

indydebi Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:39pm
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Quote:

My daughter says that you cannot fill a cake that large...



First, that's not a large cake. A 6" and an 8" are standard size cakes sold in bakeries to walk-in customers every day and they are filled with something ... icing, fruit filling, mousse, etc. A 12" cake is just slightly bigger and it's what I would refer to as a medium size cake.

No dam and too much filling will cause a cake to slide.

How are you "experimenting" with the filling? Are you using your hand to push the top layer to see if it will move? yeah ... that will cause it to slide. Are you tilting the cake WAY over on it's side to see if it will slide? yeah ... that might cause it to slide. Is the cake uniced or iced? The icing will help hold it in place, so I can see an uniced cake that might slide.

But I still vote for too much filling being the culprit.

carmijok Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 9:05pm
post #6 of 19

You must use dowel rods when you tier a cake. It stabilizes the cake layers. I even used dowel rods when I recently did a 4 layer cake (not tiered). I put two 1/2 inch white dowels cut to size thru the first three layers and then just topped with the fourth layer. No problem with the fillings. I used alternating layers of lemon curd and raspberry filling. Nothing slid and it even survived a 4 hour car trip. For a tiered cake you might use 3 or 4 rods per cake tier--depending on the size of your cakes. Space them evenly--more to the center. Find them anywhere you buy cake supplies. They are easy to cut. Small wooden dowels work well too, but for a tiered cake I'd use the white hollow dowels.

xstitcher Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 9:07pm
post #7 of 19

I'm with the rest of the gang that too much filling could be the problem. You also want to make sure you use a super stiff buttercream dam around the edges of the cake and them fill (1/4" from the outer edges and pipe it on using just a coupler). You make the super stiff bc by adding plenty of icing sugar until you can basically roll the sugar in your hand to make a ball shape, also 1/4" filling is a good amount to go with too.

You can also just use bc as your filling too.

BTW, welcome to CC!

Here's a link in case you you haven't seen it already that will help with all the acronyms used on here:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926.html

idgalpal Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 9:19pm
post #8 of 19

I once helped cater a wedding where someone did sheet cakes..they put one sheetcake on top of another with a raspberry jam-like filling - OMG! No dam, no nothing. It was sliding all over the place. Have you torted your layers or are you putting the entire layer on top on another layer?

Barb1959 Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 11:42pm
post #9 of 19

Thanks to everyone who has replied. Because I am so new on this site it took me forever to figure out how to read your replies. Okay so I'm not the brightest when it comes to this forum stuff, but I'm learning.

I was under the impression that if you were filling with buttercream you do not need to damn. Is this true. I also heard from someone else that I needed to refrigerate the cake overnight to set. I am going to try again real soon on a small cake (I can eat just so much of these trials). I will let you all know who it works out.

Barb1959 Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 11:52pm
post #10 of 19

I need to clarify something we were covering the tiered/filled cakes with fondant. When putting the fondant on the cake you could see the ridge around it were the filling was. I was told by another person on line that I was probably putting too much filling. I hope this is the problem. I am going to try a small cake very soon. I am so interested in learning how to do this but you can only eat so much cake. I have already gained 5 pounds. LOL icon_sad.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 11:57pm
post #11 of 19

There's much more to filling the cake and slapping fondant over it. Have to crumbcoat, smooth, chill (some of us do that), apply fondant, smooth it and make sure the icing under the fondant was smooth BEFORE you put it on....so many steps to get the perfectly smooth seamless cake. icon_smile.gif Keep haning in here and read the forums. You'll be on the right track soon enough!

xstitcher Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 12:31am
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb1959

I was under the impression that if you were filling with buttercream you do not need to damn. Is this true. I also heard from someone else that I needed to refrigerate the cake overnight to set.





I always apply a dam as I figure it's better to be safe than sorry! icon_biggrin.gif You only need to refrigerate the cake if the filling/icing is perishable. Others wise you can leave it out at room temperature to set.

xstitcher Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 12:44am
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb1959

I need to clarify something we were covering the tiered/filled cakes with fondant. When putting the fondant on the cake you could see the ridge around it were the filling was. I was told by another person on line that I was probably putting too much filling. icon_sad.gif




It could be due to to too much filling or it could just be the cake settling but it could have been due to the cake settling as well. This is why I like to let my cake settle for at least a few hours or even better overnight. I put the filling between the layers (with a dam) and then let it settle, no icing on the cake at this time. This way if the cake does develop a bulge from the settling I can cut off the bulge with a knife before I ice the cake. You also want to make sure that you do not put the bottoms of the cakes together (one should be on the cake board the other as the top of the cake, this will allow the cake to breath).

HTH!

Barb1959 Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 1:06am
post #14 of 19

Not sure I understand the last thing you said "You also want to make sure that you do not put the bottoms of the cakes together (one should be on the cake board the other as the top of the cake, this will allow the cake to breath). " Could you clarify.

sadsmile Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 1:30am
post #15 of 19

It has lungs!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif ??? I haven't heard about the breathing thing.
Aside from other great advice already here...
Are you leveling each layer by cutting off the rounded hump that bakes on the top? Your cakes need to be flat on top and bottom to be able to stack up square and not tilt one way or the other.

Barb1959 Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 1:37am
post #16 of 19

yes I am leveling the cakes, but I think the problem is the amount of fillling, so I will retry with less.

xstitcher Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 1:50am
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb1959

Not sure I understand the last thing you said "You also want to make sure that you do not put the bottoms of the cakes together (one should be on the cake board the other as the top of the cake, this will allow the cake to breath). " Could you clarify.




Sure I can. The bottom of the cake is the flat part that comes out of the pan (the side that is against the bottom of the pan when cooking). When you have the two layers make sure one of the bottoms is on the the cakeboard so you have a flat cake to start with and the other bottom will be the top of you cake. This will help you have a smooth flat surface from which to ice as well and if you have to trim your cakes to level them then you won't have any problems from crumbs getting in the way. If you do it this way then the tops will be together (where the filling is). I hope that made sense icon_wink.gif . Sometimes it's easier having a picture to explain.

Here's an article that I think you may benefit from to:
http://cakecentral.com/articles/68/solution-for-cake-bulging-between-layers

sadsmile Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 2:08am
post #18 of 19

The top and bottom makes perfect sense and I always do it that way because it gives the straightest cake. But what about "the breathing"...?

Barb1959 Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 10:13am
post #19 of 19

Thanks so much "xstitcher" I am learning so much from this site. The funny thing is I never really had an interest in cakes until my daughter got started. She's going to Johnson and Wales next year and now I'm looking up more information than she is. I guess it's cause I have more time on my hands. Can't wait for the weekend to try some of these new ideas.

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