How Do You Handle Donation Requests?

Business By HeidiCrumbs Updated 11 Nov 2013 , 9:37pm by mushroomhead

HeidiCrumbs Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 3:30pm
post #1 of 32

Hi!

I am a cookier but think it would be the same for any product. I have gotten numerous requests for donations lately and some I don't mind (Hospice, local United way) but some are kind of random. I realize I could just say no, but if it's a slow week I really don't mind. I usually request some sort of payment, never a flat out free order, but how much do you think is ok? My cookies go for $2.50 each and I think $1 is a fair donation price, that way it's straight across the board and if they don't want to pay the $1/cookie they don't get any. I realize it's not a real donation then, but it's a really big discount. What do you all do? Just say no? Give them totally free? Thanks!

Heidi.

31 replies
Bluehue Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 3:49pm
post #2 of 32

Difficult situation sometimes isn't it HeidiCrumbs?

I have *totally* donated depending if it is a fully fledged Charity.
Otherwise like you, i have offered biscuits and cakes at cost price.

There has to be a fine line drawn in the sand, otherwise you can be baking non stop just from the goddness of your heart - and to be honest - thats not what i am in business for.

So now i have *chosen* my charities that i will bake for and altho sounding heartless, all others i polietly say *thankyou for approaching me, but i am unable to help at this time*

Mind you, in saying all of the above - i do bake bi-monthly for a childrens hospital stall/fete - and hope that the in some small way i am putting the smile back onto an ill childs face....or contributing towards a much needed piece of new machinery.

Perhaps like me, you just have to chose your charities - again, sometimes it is a difficult call.

Bluehue.

Lita829 Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:01pm
post #3 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

Difficult situation sometimes isn't it HeidiCrumbs?

I have *totally* donated depending if it is a fully fledged Charity.
Otherwise like you, i have offered biscuits and cakes at cost price.

There has to be a fine line drawn in the sand, otherwise you can be baking non stop just from the goddness of your heart - and to be honest - thats not what i am in business for.

So now i have *chosen* my charities that i will bake for and altho sounding heartless, all others i polietly say *thankyou for approaching me, but i am unable to help at this time*

Mind you, in saying all of the above - i do bake bi-monthly for a childrens hospital stall/fete - and hope that the in some small way i am putting the smile back onto an ill childs face....or contributing towards a much needed piece of new machinery.

Perhaps like me, you just have to chose your charities - again, sometimes it is a difficult call.

Bluehue.




I agree. I think thats only fair. I also give away baked goods as charitable donations. I just added a second program to my giving. However, you can't bake for everyone for free. I think that you have to pick charities/programs that mean something to you and support them.

cownsj Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:10pm
post #4 of 32

I haven't had much experience with this, though I have donated cakes to organizations I really support in my area. Just thought I'd share a story that's happening right now. Several months ago I was approached about donating a cake to the township's annual events day, this year being a big anniversary year. I said yes, but we'd have to get together to figure out the details. Months go by, nothing, so I email and ask about getting together. I'm told someone else can handle it, they are too busy for me (mind you, this is a small town). I begin to ask the other person who is trying to help, but hasn't a clue about basics things, like, how many people do you want the cake for? Any ideas for a design? Will the cake be indoors in AC or outdoors and will it be protected from the sun? Will it be cut throughout out the day, or a display piece to be cut at the end of the day? The helpful person now has to direct me back to the original person handling it because they haven't a clue. I email and email this person and get zero replies. This event is on the 12th, I have a wedding dessert buffet plus a custom cake for this Sunday, so this week is tied up. Still no answer, then I find out that the "volunteer" putting this together is being paid for her services yet she wants me to give them the equivalent of an $800 cake for free. Next thing I know, there are posters up everywhere listing the events of the day, things people are donating, etc. including a pie eating contest, and not one word of my donation to the entire event. I finally decided that if they can't respect the time and money involved for me, then they really can't appreciate the types of cakes I do (and she did look at my portfolio). So I emailed two days ago with a polite list of reasons I feel I cannot do the cake for them, but wanted to be sure "they" had enough notice and suggested they go to the local supermarket and have an edible image done on a cake for them.
I did do the right thing, didn't I?

KHalstead Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:19pm
post #5 of 32

So far, everything that's been "donated" including gift certificates as well as baked goods has been given completely "free" of charge!! However, I think I got duped on one!

I had a lady, said her name was Laurie,approach me saying that she was organizing a Cancer banquet/fundraiser and that they were charging $100.00/plate as well as auctioning off gift certificates to different businesses to raise money for Cancer research, etc.........I'm about a 40 min. drive from where the fundraiser was going to be held, and she asked if I'd donate a gift certificate.
Well, I mentioned to her that I had already committed to a Breast Cancer benefit of an old friend and was donating 200.00 worth of cake (retail price), as well as a $100.00 gift certificate for an auction, and wasn't sure how much I could give them. She said any amount was fine, they would appreciate anything. So I committed to giving $50.00 in the form of a gift certificate (I wound up sending a $75 gift certificate in the end though). She thanked me profusely and told me it really hit home for her as she had just been diagnosed with breast cancer herself.
I was, at the very same moment undergoing all sorts of tests, mamogram, utrasounds, and eventually a biopsy for breast cancer as well (I'm 31, and had to jump through hoops to get the insur. company to pay for it all, but that's another story), so I think it really touched a chord with me!
Fast forward 2 weeks AFTER the benefit (or supposed benefit) and a lady named "Marie" contacts me and says she's the lucky recipient of the gift certificate and she also has breast cancer and was due to get married in 10 months, but upon docs orders has to move up the wedding to 3 weeks from that date.
She orders a 6" round for the cutting ceremony and then orders 12 dozens of cake balls because they had a relative making cupcakes for the wedding guests, so they just needed some " other desserts to offer" in addition to the cupcakes.
Well, the wedding came and went and we emailed very regularly about different things.....and then I get an email from "Marie's email" that says," here is a photo of the gorgeous wedding cake you made me with my topper on it, thank you again for making my special day even more special. You really went above and beyond for me and I will never forget it". (She ordered a plain 6" round, and I piped on a design from a cake that she mentioned was her dream cake but couldn't afford it, in one of her first emails........and also decorated the board w/ ribbon to match everything she had at her wedding, with a litte bow and everything).......well, at the end of the letter.......she says, Thanks again, "Laurie"
I sat there for a minute and said "Laurie?" that's the name of the lady that originally asked for the gift certificate 3 months ago!! Then, wanting to give her the benefit of the doubt though, maybe Laurie and Marie are friends and Laurie was at the wedding and wanted to send me pics........but she said, the pictures of MY wedding cake and MY topper! Then I scrolled down on the email and saw every email forwarded between "Marie" and I for the last 3 months all in a row!!!!

So, I'm thinking some random chick asked for a gift certificate......I sent it, and then she cashed it in as well! Basically giving her $75 worth of product for free!! No wonder I made her day special! LOL
All in all, I gave it with the right intentions so it doesn't upset me...if she did take advantage then that's something she has to live with, not me!

In other words, I think CHOOSING your charities sounds like a really good idea!

Bluehue Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:36pm
post #6 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

yet she wants me to give them the equivalent of an $800 cake for free.
WT? icon_eek.gif

So I emailed two days ago with a polite list of reasons I feel I cannot do the cake for them, but wanted to be sure "they" had enough notice and suggested they go to the local supermarket and have an edible image done on a cake for them.

I did do the right thing, didn't I?

In a word - YES.
I think that with all the emailing and chasing after them you have done - you can rest assured that you have done the right thing.

I'm still struggling to get off the floor after falling off my chair whilst reading about the $800.00 cake -
Donations are one thing - but that *takes the cake* - incredible -
Bluehue.





KHalstead ......*splat* i just fell off my chair again after reding your story -
Good grief - is there no end to peoples greediness in this world ???? - totally gobsmacking your story is -
At least YOU can lie straight in your bed each night - thumbs_up.gif

*Bluehue climbs back onto the chair for a 2nd time*

cownsj Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:46pm
post #7 of 32

In a word - YES.
I think that with all the emailing and chasing after them you have done - you can rest assured that you have done the right thing.

I'm still struggling to get off the floor after falling off my chair whilst reading about the $800.00 cake -
Donations are one thing - but that *takes the cake* - incredible -
Bluehue.
[/quote]


KHalstead ......*splat* i just fell off my chair again after reding your story -
Good grief - is there no end to peoples greediness in this world ???? - totally gobsmacking your story is -
At least YOU can lie straight in your bed each night - thumbs_up.gif

*Bluehue climbs back onto the chair for a 2nd time*
[/quote]

Thank you so very much. (Hope you didn't hurt yourself falling off your chair....lol). I have to say I had such a hard time reaching that decision and it still bothers me, alot. Mainly that I backed away from a job, even if it's a donation. But it also galls me to find out that the volunteer running it is getting paid, when others would have done the work for free. And I just plain feel disrespected. Your answer really has helped me in feeling I made the right decision. I certainly also didn't want to put out a cake that would not represent my best work. That would only give them a free cake, and lose me business. And my business is ALL word of mouth right now. Thanks again.

KHalstead Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:53pm
post #8 of 32

yeah, can you imagine doing that?? I mean I've heard of people trying to save money by advertising for companies with banners and such at their wedding in exchange for services.........but to just ask someone for a gift certificate "in the name of charity no less" all the while discussing with me HER battle with cancer while I was going through something VERY similar..........for all I know she lied about that too!!
Crazy what people are capable of!

cownsj Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 5:03pm
post #9 of 32

Especially because of the circumstances of what you were going through, I think her actions were completely unconscienable. I'm so sorry she did this to you. But your heart was definitely in the right place.
Now, the devils advocate in me would consider contacting the charity to see if she is affiliated and if she was in fact a person who won it. And if not, maybe contact her about committing fraud against you and that you expect to be reimbursed for the amount of the gift certificate before filing a complaint against her. Not that you actually expect her to cough up the money, but just to let her know that you discovered her scam. Let her deal with her conscience.
Having read your story, I think that if I didn't know the people asking for a donation, I'd ask for some paperwork from them that I could verify first. How sad things should come to this.

costumeczar Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 5:27pm
post #10 of 32

One way to get around this is to find a charity that you're personally interested in, and give them donations exclusively. If another group calls asking for donations, you can tell them that you already donate to one organization that's your "pet project," so you're unable to do more donations at this time. That way you don't feel like a total scrooge, and you're also donating to a charity that you like.

brincess_b Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 7:35pm
post #11 of 32

i work in a nursing home, and used to do cakes for our fundraisers. NO MORE! the first time saying no was hard, but boy, was it worth it. no more stress, no more feeling taken for granted.

the cakes i did were nice, nothing too fancy, to be raffled off - only the events were so poorly organised, that ticket sales were minimal. they were so slow off the mark that one cake ended up being eaten by the staff because they took so long to organise and draw a winner. so i had to do a second cake. after that, i decided i would not be doing another one.

if i was set up as a proper business, i would like to donate to charities i knew, who would be doing a proper job of organising what ever the cake was for!
xx

indydebi Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:05pm
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by brincess_b

NO MORE! the first time saying no was hard, but boy, was it worth it. no more stress, no more feeling taken for granted.




I SO know what you mean. Years ago (I was actually still married to my first husband at the time), I "volunteered" to do the food for a big event connected with a local festival every year. Finger sandwiches, veggies trays, fruit, cheeseball/crackers, cake, punch, hand made mints, nut .... the whole 9 yards. I did this for 4-5 years.

It never generated any business. The final straw was when I found out a lunch was held to thank the volunteers .... and I wasn't invited. I wasn't looking for a free lunch .... but a token gesture of appreciation would have been very welcome.

The next year, I told them I couldn't do it. Hmmmmm..... suddenly cookies and punch were "good enough".

I not only felt unappreciated but like you said, 'taken for granted'.

I pick my charities.

BTW, I donated a gift certificate to be raffled off over a year ago. It never got used. So offering gift certificates can work out really great! icon_rolleyes.gif

diane706 Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:33pm
post #13 of 32

Interesting this subject came up. I was asked by formal letter if I would donate a cake for a "pinning ceremony" for the local college's nursing program. They wanted a cake for 200. I told them that right now I'm not in the position to do this and asked if they could contribute a little. She said it wasn't possible. YIKES! This isn't even a charity! Most of the requests I get aren't. icon_eek.gif

brincess_b Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:42pm
post #14 of 32

you win some you lose some - that nursing organiser person probably just though what the hell, they have nothing to lose by asking.

i do rainbows, and other things in the past, and we dowould just fire off letters asking for stuff for fundraisers - if you got a yes, it was great if you got a no, well, it was an unsoliceted appeal!

we just need the sense not to be suckered by a sob story!

my saying no was helped as my work collegues didnt agree with how i/ my cakes got treated, so at least i knew back up was there if needed!
xx

Lita829 Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 9:09pm
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

One way to get around this is to find a charity that you're personally interested in, and give them donations exclusively. If another group calls asking for donations, you can tell them that you already donate to one organization that's your "pet project," so you're unable to do more donations at this time. That way you don't feel like a total scrooge, and you're also donating to a charity that you like.




Thats what I do. The organization which I've been donating baked goods to for almost 2 years didn't ask me to donate baked goods, I volunteered. It wasn't to generate business but to make the clients whom this organization serves feel special. If you pick the organization(s) you want to donate to without them having to solicit donations from you, then you would not feel taken advantage of. JMHO

Edited to add that I don't mean to sound harsh. I just agree with Costumeczar.

cownsj Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 4:38pm
post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue

Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

yet she wants me to give them the equivalent of an $800 cake for free.
WT? icon_eek.gif

So I emailed two days ago with a polite list of reasons I feel I cannot do the cake for them, but wanted to be sure "they" had enough notice and suggested they go to the local supermarket and have an edible image done on a cake for them.

I did do the right thing, didn't I?

In a word - YES.
I think that with all the emailing and chasing after them you have done - you can rest assured that you have done the right thing.

I'm still struggling to get off the floor after falling off my chair whilst reading about the $800.00 cake -
Donations are one thing - but that *takes the cake* - incredible -
Bluehue.




KHalstead ......*splat* i just fell off my chair again after reding your story -
Good grief - is there no end to peoples greediness in this world ???? - totally gobsmacking your story is -
At least YOU can lie straight in your bed each night - thumbs_up.gif

*Bluehue climbs back onto the chair for a 2nd time*




I just had to send an update. We went to the event mentioned above. We heard there "might" be a cake somewhere but no one seemed to know where it was or anyone who may have had some. Then the event coordinator comes up to my wife and I and says, "too bad we weren't able to do the cake, it would have been nice." I'm still not sure if she was trying to be nice or sarcastic. I just ignorned her, didn't say a word. I was afraid I might not say something very nice. My wife was just too shocked to speak.

indydebi Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 4:48pm
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cownsj

Then the event coordinator comes up to my wife and I and says, "too bad we weren't able to do the cake, it would have been nice." I'm still not sure if she was trying to be nice or sarcastic. I just ignorned her, didn't say a word. I was afraid I might not say something very nice. My wife was just too shocked to speak.




Ah man, you gotta grow a little more smart-a$$ in ya! 'Coz I would have smiled sweetly (hubby says it's the smile of death .. he KNOWS what I mean when I get my "sweet smile" on my face!), and said, "Yes. Yes, it would have. As a matter of fact, it would have been freakin' AWESOME!!!" icon_rolleyes.gificon_biggrin.gif

neelycharmed Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 4:51pm
post #18 of 32

Hi,
I've only done 2 donations.
First was for a friend car accident/fundraiser, second was for a guy who needs a double lung transplant.
I live in a small town where everyone knows everyone so I would like to think that if I was ever in that spot and needed help, I would hope that they would help me as well.
icon_smile.gif Jodi

cownsj Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 4:55pm
post #19 of 32

Ah man, you gotta grow a little more smart-a$$ in ya! 'Coz I would have smiled sweetly (hubby says it's the smile of death .. he KNOWS what I mean when I get my "sweet smile" on my face!), and said, "Yes. Yes, it would have. As a matter of fact, it would have been freakin' AWESOME!!!" icon_rolleyes.gificon_biggrin.gif[/quote]

And my wife always tells me what a smart-a$$ I am. lol But I love your reply, that would have been soooo perfect. I'll have to remember it, if a next time comes around. Thank you!

indydebi Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 6:08pm
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by neelycharmed

...so I would like to think that if I was ever in that spot and needed help, I would hope that they would help me as well.
icon_smile.gif Jodi


I don't think anyone disagrees with that. But I don't think that's what we're talking about here. We're talking about those who assume we 'have' to donate; those who assume they can dictate how much we'll donate; and those who assume that the only reason we went into business was so we could give away stuff for free all the time.

CakeDiva73 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 6:31pm
post #21 of 32

Your cookies are awesome!! ~ Wow! icon_smile.gif

Nchanted1 Posted 15 Sep 2009 , 5:31pm
post #22 of 32

I don't do it at all anymore. I never once had a good experience, or got a single order out of any of the many donations I gave.

I made a 4 tier white and gold musc themed cake with individually molded instruments and piped stanzas with notes for 200 people. Took a solid week, but they said there would be pictures with the governor and celebrities that i could use for advertising. They forgot to take a picture, and forgot to say thank you. But they did call me a year later...

I made a cake in the shape of a local museum (it's an eccentric castle) for their anniversary bash. Board was to come and get their picture taken with my cake. Never showed. What I did get was hoards of inebriated guests who had been chowing down all night, and felt that by skipping dessert, they were still on their diets. They reacted to my offer of cake as if it were a hissing snake. I took home 3/4 of the cake i had worked on for 50 hours. Got a form letter thanking me, unsigned. Best part was, a big article in the local paper showed the big wigs ceremoniously cutting a sheet cake!

Did the Cancer Society benefits for years, until one year there were 2 cakes. My fancy one, which the chairlady took home, and sheets they PAID FOR to serve.

I could go on and on...one last story. I did a sculpted Rainbow fish for my kid's elementary school fair. It was to be out as a raffle prize with my cards. I drop it off, big reaction etc. Go home happy. Back hours later, where is my cake? Not anywhere to be seen, i find the chairman, ask what's up? The cake was so nice, so beautiful, they decided to just GIVE IT TO THE PRINCIPAL, who had taken it home so it wouodn't get damaged. Nobody saw it at all. And what happened to the business cards? They were in his pocket, and he kindly returned them to me. He is a local business man, so he should have known better.

If you want to support a charity. write a check.

Lita829 Posted 15 Sep 2009 , 6:19pm
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nchanted1

I don't do it at all anymore. I never once had a good experience, or got a single order out of any of the many donations I gave.

I made a 4 tier white and gold musc themed cake with individually molded instruments and piped stanzas with notes for 200 people. Took a solid week, but they said there would be pictures with the governor and celebrities that i could use for advertising. They forgot to take a picture, and forgot to say thank you. But they did call me a year later...

I made a cake in the shape of a local museum (it's an eccentric castle) for their anniversary bash. Board was to come and get their picture taken with my cake. Never showed. What I did get was hoards of inebriated guests who had been chowing down all night, and felt that by skipping dessert, they were still on their diets. They reacted to my offer of cake as if it were a hissing snake. I took home 3/4 of the cake i had worked on for 50 hours. Got a form letter thanking me, unsigned. Best part was, a big article in the local paper showed the big wigs ceremoniously cutting a sheet cake!

Did the Cancer Society benefits for years, until one year there were 2 cakes. My fancy one, which the chairlady took home, and sheets they PAID FOR to serve.

I could go on and on...one last story. I did a sculpted Rainbow fish for my kid's elementary school fair. It was to be out as a raffle prize with my cards. I drop it off, big reaction etc. Go home happy. Back hours later, where is my cake? Not anywhere to be seen, i find the chairman, ask what's up? The cake was so nice, so beautiful, they decided to just GIVE IT TO THE PRINCIPAL, who had taken it home so it wouodn't get damaged. Nobody saw it at all. And what happened to the business cards? They were in his pocket, and he kindly returned them to me. He is a local business man, so he should have known better.

If you want to support a charity. write a check.




WOW icon_surprised.gif . I am sorry you had such a bad experience donating baked goods. That's why I don't donate to groups within my hometown because that would probably be the response I'd get. They are so darn ghetto. Some people take kindness for weakness and others take advantage of kindness. I definately understand your bitterness but I wouldn't completely give up on donating your scrumptious baked goods.

I donate to a nearby chapter of a national organization (I don't want to disclose the name of the organization at this time. You can PM me for the name or some ideas of small local charities you can bake for). My goal is not to be recognized but to give so that the patrons enjoy the goods. If that is also your goal, then try an organization like that.

HTH

mcaulir Posted 15 Sep 2009 , 10:25pm
post #24 of 32

By the time you spend all the hours making cake, it would be much cheaper to write a cheque. Are donations to charities tax deductable in the US? I never buy raffle tickets etc any more. Straight donation, give me a receipt, straight to the tax man.

sugarycreations Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 1:27pm
post #25 of 32

While this is something everybody has to decide for themselves, I do think caution is needed.

I donated cakes for a fundraiser for a group I greatly believe in & KNOW they do wonderful things. A friend was involved & kept saying I'd get all this business from it. I knew better but did it anyway. Fundraiser was on the other side of town. The chances of people driving 18 miles to buy a cake when a nice cake shop is on their side of town is so low as to not be worth discussing. They did see to it I got lots of advertising, etc, but of course, it didn't benefit me. I knew it wouldn't so didn't care. It was to help a great cause.

What I did care about was how unrealistic they were on how many people would need to be served cake. My shop wasn't "open" yet & I had had to get special permission from the building inspector & health department to use the kitchen for baking. They were very cooperative. Not being completely set up, things took a lot longer than normal--time I didn't have. As a result, I didn't take as much cake as had been agreed upon. Boy am I glad!! Luckily I had been encouraged to stay & serve & mingle. They were WAY OFF on their estimates so tidying up the table several cakes suddenly disappeared. I used those cakes in other places for other things I support & as seeds in other places that might possibly pay off for me.

I volunteered to donate 10 dozen cupcakes down the road from me; will deliver them in a couple of hours. Again, it's a great cause. I wouldn't worry about donating unless it's something you really support. A check is easier, but in my case I can afford to donate more in the way of gift certificates or product than I could afford to give in money. I'm only out the wholesale price of the ingredients. If it's a cause I support, I would be using my time in some way to help them anyway. In this case I'm just using it to bake icon_wink.gif which is something I enjoy.

The cancer thing sucks. Unfortunately, it goes on more than we would like to think. They are prosecuting a city employee here who bilked fellow employees & other out of @$80 thousand in $$ & goods & services with the poor me can't afford because of cancer. Just be careful.

RobzC8kz Posted 24 Sep 2009 , 1:40am
post #26 of 32

Tell them no.

As someone who has tried to be charitable in the past, I found myself on the dirty end of the stick every single time!!

Here's the thing that I've found about organizations that ask you to donate your cakes 1.) they will never order from you for any other occasion 2.) they want the most ornate and rediculously expensive cakes as the donation!

I once did a donation cake for a church xmas party. I'm thinking I'll just make a nice sheet cake and decorate it all "xmas-y!" Nope. They wanted a whole spread! They wanted gift box cakes and a separate Santa cake to feed like 200 people!! I was fa-loored. I told them straight out that what they're asking for will cost ME at least $150.00 just for the supplies!! And I explained that I'm not even a professional baker who doesn't make enough money to cover those costs!!

They were upset and tried to guilt trip me, but I explained that I agreed to do a simple cake as a donation...not an entire winter wonderland 3D display!! Luckily they weren't from MY church.

I also tried to exchange some cake work for a lady who did party planning and wedding planning. I agreed to furnish 6 free cakes to parties/venues that she was paying for herself, in order to get all the business from clients that were paying HER. Sounded very lucrative at first! However, the free cakes SHE wanted were very elaborate and expensive!! And the cakes that she had me make for HER clients that were paying HER were the same!!

However, instead of ME setting the price and HER adding the price of the cake to the package price of the party, SHE was out there quoting my prices for me and was expecting me to deliver these cakes to venues all over the country and back!! And the prices she was quoting were barely enough to break even...maybe make a small, insignificant profit!!

After doing the initial six cakes and a couple of HER client's cakes, I told her, "I set my prices....not you. Either stop undercutting me or stop ordering from me. Stop trying to maximize YOUR profits by minimizing MINE." She stopped ordering from me. Well...I stopped taking her phone calls. She comes up on my phone as "DON'T ANSWER."

It's not worth the trouble to be charitable. Everyone wants for free what they'd never pay for to begin with.

LittleLinda Posted 11 Oct 2009 , 6:16pm
post #27 of 32

I donate a certificate that I print out for the specific cause and sign it in ink.(in case somebody tries to make a copy) It is for an 11x15 sheetcake, no fillings, no fondant, no cash value.

bakemeacakemd Posted 12 Oct 2009 , 12:45am
post #28 of 32

I am a baker and had also "given up" on donations because they never led to more business. I love doing cakes for free for individuals but not for a cause unless I don't expect anything in return. The funny thing is, I have now turned my "business" into a donation. I am in the process of filing incorporation papers to start a non-profit that will only do cakes for critically ill children and their siblings. The ability to provide these kids with a "birthday" that may not otherwise be celebrated because of circumstances is the reward. We hope to soon expand to other cities so if anyone feels passionate about the cause feel free to PM me. I would love to hear from you.

Lita829 Posted 12 Oct 2009 , 1:03am
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakemeacakemd

I am a baker and had also "given up" on donations because they never led to more business. I love doing cakes for free for individuals but not for a cause unless I don't expect anything in return. The funny thing is, I have now turned my "business" into a donation. I am in the process of filing incorporation papers to start a non-profit that will only do cakes for critically ill children and their siblings. The ability to provide these kids with a "birthday" that may not otherwise be celebrated because of circumstances is the reward. We hope to soon expand to other cities so if anyone feels passionate about the cause feel free to PM me. I would love to hear from you.




You sound like you have a heart of gold icon_smile.gif I was a pediatric RN for almost 6 years and I can attest that your gesture will be appreciated and brighten the day for that special child and their family. I saw, first hand, the suffering and the impact that catastrophic and chronic illness has, not only on the child, but the entire family unit. One day to feel normal (meaning having a break from the reality of their situation) is something that they all need. I think that its a beautiful thing you are doing.

saberger Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 10:23pm
post #30 of 32

I am really interested in seeing the kind of gift certificate you print. would anybody be willing to share a pic of what yours looks like?

In regards to donations....well, I am trying to get legal and I started the NJ Chapter of Free Cakes For Kids, so I figure that will be my 'cause'. There is a fundraiser set up for it and I will be donating cookies to be sold to raise $ for FCFK. However, some of the donations will cover my cost and the rest goes to FCFKNJ. So, I think I will be set when it comes to my donations and my cause. But I do like the idea of the gift certificate a lot and would like to have one ready to go when I become legal. I wouldn't mind donating one of those for another good cause in the future. I would think THAT gets you business rather than just donating cake/cookies/cupcakes.

OP-I don't think you were wrong to back out. YOU were doing THEM a favor, not the other way around and they should have treated you like a professional. And with the comment the volunteer made, a good response is: "It IS a shame that there wasn't cake. Hopefully next time you will be better organized and respond to people in a timely manner."

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