Storing A Fondant Cake

Decorating By sweetjane3 Updated 2 Sep 2009 , 4:50pm by PinkLisa

sweetjane3 Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 6:02pm
post #1 of 10

I just frosted my cake with buttercream and covered it with marshmallow fondant. What is the proper way to store it until tommorrow? Is it ok to leave out at room temperature? Do I need to cover with clear wrap? The cake has a raspberry jam for a filling. Any suggestions would be great. Thank you.

9 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 6:09pm
post #2 of 10

Leave it out. Don't wrap it tightly in plastic wrap because your fondant needs to breathe. If you're worried about it getting dusty, put it in a box and loosely drape waxed paper or plastic wrap over the top, if the box has no lid.

I always put it in a box if it's for someone else, and if it's for family, it goes on the bar with no covering.

sweetjane3 Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 7:28pm
post #3 of 10

O.k. I do have it in a box right now on my counter. Should I worry about the rapberry jam or will it be ok until tomorrow?

Rylan Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 11:50pm
post #4 of 10

I personally would refrigerate it due to the jam because most jams are perishable.

JanH Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 1:41am
post #5 of 10

Actually, commercially prepared jams, and jelly are basically sugar with bits of fruit, or fruit juice.

Refrigeration is recommended after opening for long term storage. Because really, who eats more than a teaspoon or two of jam, etc. on their toast once in a while....

Your jam filling will be fine for the amount of time it will take for the cake to be consumed.

Smuckers jams/jellies/toppings are classified as "non-perishables:"

http://www.smuckers.com/faq/product/pg3.aspx#2

How jams/jellies are manufactured:

http://www.enotes.com/how-products-encyclopedia/jam-jelly

HTH

P.S. If you wish to further preserve/enhance the flavor of jam fillings, you can add a complementary flavor of Jello:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/PegW/CakeFilling.htm

PinkLisa Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 2:11am
post #6 of 10

JanH - Thanks for that information on jams. The answer is always you don't need to refrigerate the cake if the fillings don't require refrigeration, but mine always seem to -- buttercream (with butter) and SMBC.

sweetjane3 Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 3:41am
post #7 of 10

Thank you Janh for the info and interesting links. They were very helpful. Thanks everyone!

JanH Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:37pm
post #8 of 10

[quote="PinkLisa"] The answer is always you don't need to refrigerate the cake if the fillings don't require refrigeration, but mine always seem to -- buttercream (with butter) quote]

American buttercreams made with butter and/or small amounts of milk/cream don't require refrigeration because the large amounts of powdered sugar control the "water activity:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-617882-.html

HTH

catlharper Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:48pm
post #9 of 10

The only time I refridgerate a fondant cake is when the outside air is too hot for it to not get damaged by the heat. Sunday was the case for this for me. My A/C went out so I needed to chill the cake. Fortunately there was no signs of water spots on the fondant but if I hadn't chilled it then it may have well melted. Usually they go in a box for delivery as soon as possible..the delivery I mean<G>

PinkLisa Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 4:50pm
post #10 of 10

JanH - How long can you keep out buttercream (with butter). What are your thoughts on SBMC? Thanks so much for your help!

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