Cake Is Baked - What Next

Decorating By gloria Updated 7 Sep 2009 , 1:51am by emiyeric

gloria Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 1:45am
post #1 of 15

Do you wrap and freeze next.
Do you torte (divide) your cakes first and freeze.
Do you crumb coat then freeze.

I normally just wrap and freeze (I like the taste of frozen) then I torte when they are almost unfrozen, then crumb coat.

Anyone have a better way?

14 replies
backermeister Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:21am
post #2 of 15

Cakes are easier to torte if frozen or refrig, but you could torte and ice then freeze. Just wrap really well to preserve the flavor. The steps are totally up to your preference. icon_biggrin.gif

Skirt Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:38am
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoseley

Cakes are easier to torte if frozen or refrig, but you could torte and ice then freeze. Just wrap really well to preserve the flavor. The steps are totally up to your preference. icon_biggrin.gif




You can completely ice then freeze? Really? If ever I've frozen, the cakes have always gone in whole, and naked. My curiosity is peaked icon_confused.gif

redpepper Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:55am
post #4 of 15

How long does it take a cake to thaw? Can you finish decorating with buttercream while it is still frozen? What if you are covering it with fondant?
I didn't think you could freeze if you cover with fondant?

Thanks in advance for the advise this could make my life easier at times. thumbs_up.gif
Thank you!! icon_razz.gif

gloria Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:14pm
post #5 of 15

After my cakes cooled I torted.

P.S. Wiltons leveller sucks - I ended up using a large knife.

Usually I torte after I have done the freeze/thaw.

mcdonald Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:27pm
post #6 of 15

I always bake and wrap tightly to freeze. I never torte my cakes, I guess I should but I don't. I crumb coat after it has sat out for about 10 minutes.. I like to start icing mine while they are still somewhat frozen.

You can freeze a decorated buttercream cake.. I have heard but not done. I know that you have to wrap it up real well and leave out for a bit so that when it come to room temp, if the cake sweats, it will need a bit longer to absorb the extra moisture.

You can put a fondant covered cake in the fridg.. depending on the fondant. Satin Ice and Fondx are two that will work. It too might have moisture that might sweat.

catlharper Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:40pm
post #7 of 15

I bake, let cool completely on a rack then divide and wrap those divisions seperately in Press and Seal for freezing at least 24 hours. Then I take it out of the freezer, unwrap each tier, fill, crumb coat and then chill for about an hour. Then I take it out, let it unfreeze for about 2 hours and then fondant. If not using fondant then I ice right after the chilling of the crumb coat.

I use to torte after it had thawed a bit but found that I end up with more crumbs that way. I use a firmer cake recipe tho' so that may be why I can torte after baking and cooling.

Good luck!

PuffCake Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:44pm
post #8 of 15

I cool somewhat but not completely, then level, torte and wrap each piece separately with plastic wrap. Then I place in ziploc bag and freeze up to a week or two, but usually 2-3 days. I ice my cakes frozen. This process works great for me, they always turn out good this way.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 5:55pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdonald

I always bake and wrap tightly to freeze. I never torte my cakes, I guess I should but I don't. I crumb coat after it has sat out for about 10 minutes.. I like to start icing mine while they are still somewhat frozen.

You can freeze a decorated buttercream cake.. I have heard but not done. I know that you have to wrap it up real well and leave out for a bit so that when it come to room temp, if the cake sweats, it will need a bit longer to absorb the extra moisture.

You can put a fondant covered cake in the fridg.. depending on the fondant. and Fondx are two that will work. It too might have moisture that might sweat.




A good way to do that is to move the frozen cake to the refrigerator over night, then to the counter for a few hours the next day before unboxing...works well.

backermeister Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 7:20pm
post #10 of 15

Any of these steps works out fine. I tend to bake,torte,fill, and crumb coat my cake then wrap well and freeze with the crumb coat (this protects your cake). This saves time so when you remove your cake you can go straight to decorations. I haven't decorated a cake and then frozen but imagine as long as you wrap it once it is par frozen the decos should be ok. Just watch out for bright icing decos cause they could have condensation out of the freezer and then bleed. Happy Caking. icon_biggrin.gif

Caike Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 8:42pm
post #11 of 15

Perhaps a stupid question - what are you wrapping with and how do you do it?

AnnaJo Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 9:22pm
post #12 of 15

I'm new to this whole world of cake deco. and I don't understand why I should freeze the cake. Can someone please explain? May be thats why my cake are dry the next day. Thank you.

backermeister Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 11:45pm
post #13 of 15

I wrap cakes with saran/plastic wrap in several layers to retain flavor and keep frostbite away. I've also read that you can wrap in alum foil or if small cake can place in a ziploc bag and remove as much air as possible. Up to you but saran wrap has worked well. I don't make a practice out of freezing cakes but will do this if I need to bake the cake more than several days ahead of its due date to help preserve freshness. If cake is covered with fondant and icing and filling are not perishable than the fondant should retain the cakes freshness for approx 5-7 days at room temp. I don't freeze fondant covered cakes but I have refrig them with good results. You just have to let them sit out at room temp and dry before doing anything else to the cake.hth icon_biggrin.gif

Caike Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 1:37am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoseley

I wrap cakes with saran/plastic wrap in several layers to retain flavor and keep frostbite away. I've also read that you can wrap in alum foil or if small cake can place in a ziploc bag and remove as much air as possible. Up to you but saran wrap has worked well. I don't make a practice out of freezing cakes but will do this if I need to bake the cake more than several days ahead of its due date to help preserve freshness. If cake is covered with fondant and icing and filling are not perishable than the fondant should retain the cakes freshness for approx 5-7 days at room temp. I don't freeze fondant covered cakes but I have refrig them with good results. You just have to let them sit out at room temp and dry before doing anything else to the cake.hth icon_biggrin.gif





Awesome post - thanks for the help/info! icon_smile.gif

emiyeric Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 1:51am
post #15 of 15

Since I got my Agbay (YEEAAAAHHH!!!) it's just so easy for me to torte and level the things whether or not they'fre frozen, I just do it beforehand, then wrap and double wrap and freeze. That way, I hit the ground running when I'm finally ready to sit down and work with it, and don't have to just THEN start cutting and worrying about crumbs. I will say, though, when I did my Darth Vader cake with all the carving, I froze, then carved, then crumb coated and then froze again until ready to use, and it worked beautifully as well. Good luck!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%