Nfsc - How Many Cookies From Batch?

Baking By ZlatkaT Updated 1 Sep 2009 , 3:06am by jimandmollie

ZlatkaT Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 1:21pm
post #1 of 13

I will make my first NFSC, and I need to bake 5 dozen of cross cookies (4x3). Will one batch be enough?
Also how thick do you roll out your cookies, I typically go around 1/4" when I do my GB, but I don't have experience with sugar cookie, do they rise well? And at last is the recipe soft sugar cookie or a bit crunchy??
Thank you.

12 replies
Kiddiekakes Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 1:27pm
post #2 of 13

I usually get about 9-11 or 12 large 4 inches cookies from one batch.

ZlatkaT Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 1:44pm
post #3 of 13

really? So for 5 dozens of cross cookies (around 3x4) I will need at least 4 batches? These cookies are expensive!

sjmoral Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:18pm
post #4 of 13

I made those crosses for my daughter's first communion and I would say you can get 5 dozen with 2 batches. I roll them 1/4" but if you are putting them on sticks you need them to be thicker. I usually bake them a liitle longer or even bake at 350 instead of 325 to make them a bit cruncy on the outside but they are on the softer side, not too much. These are a hit even with people who have not liked sugar cookies on the past.
You can always bake and freeze them until ready to decorate...

bbmom Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:30pm
post #5 of 13

When I make a whole batch of NFSC I almost always get 49 cookies of various shapes and sizes ...1/4-3/8thick and the cookies are usually about 3". I've made many batches and for some reason 49 is my magic number.

jimandmollie Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:32pm
post #6 of 13

I just made 30 bees that were about 2.5" X 3" and 30 watermelon slices 2.5" X 3" and had enough left over for about 5 more cookies. Out of one batch. I rolled mine about a quarter inch thick. They are a softer cookie but very good once that royal icing is on there. I suggest starting with one batch and having ingredients on hand for a second batch just in case. They don't change much at all when they bake, rising or spreading out. This recipe is great! Hope that helps!

bbmom Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:35pm
post #7 of 13

Oh, I just read your other questions...NFSC doesnt rise at all, its the exact size and shape when you cut it, thats why so many people like it for detailed cut outs. The softness depends on how long you cook it, in my oven I need to bake mine for about 13-14min for a harder cookie, otherwise it will be too soft to stay on the stick. So if you want softer bake a bit less, harder bake longer. Hope that helps.

indydebi Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:40pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZlatkaT

really? So for 5 dozens of cross cookies (around 3x4) I will need at least 4 batches? These cookies are expensive!




The last time I costed out this recipe, my ingredient cost was around $3 for a batch. I use margarine and not butter so that will mak a slight cost difference if you're a butter person.

$3/batch x 4 batches = $12
60 four-inch cookies, assuming the standard $1/inch = $4/cookie x 60 = $240.

Even if you use $15 worth of butter and $30 worth of icing, it sounds like a good deal to me. thumbs_up.gif

ZlatkaT Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 3:31pm
post #9 of 13

Thank you everyone, I will start with one batch and will see.
Indydebi, have you notice change of taste when you used margarine instead of butter? I am just curious, I will use butter for my first try. And yeah, to get $240 for cookies sounds like good deal! But I am going shut up how much I get.

jimandmollie Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 3:56pm
post #10 of 13

I used margarine and they tasted fine to me. But then, I use margarine for everything. *ducks to avoid flying objects that I know everyone is gonna throw at me! icon_lol.gif *

bbmom Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:26pm
post #11 of 13

I'm a butter girl myself, I can definitely taste the difference, but it all depends on what you're used to. Also I've read that margarine will bake up softer.

indydebi Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:50pm
post #12 of 13

I've never use butter in any of my baking in my entire life. I often joke about how I must have been the only poor kid in the country because my mom would NEVER spend that much for "butter" when that yellow stick of fat for $0.39 worked JUST fine!! icon_biggrin.gif If it was yellow and you spread it on toast, then we called it butter.

I've tasted butter .... and I find it nasty and tart tasting.

When my Sysco rep gave me a price for butter (at three-something a pound), I said, "I can get it for 69 cents at walmart!" She said, "For BUTTER????" I laughed and said, "OHHHH!!!!!!!!!! When I said butter, you thought I meant BUTTER!!!!" icon_lol.gif

Yes, there is a taste difference, but I think if you like it or not depends on what you were raised with or what you're used to.

jimandmollie Posted 1 Sep 2009 , 3:06am
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I've never use butter in any of my baking in my entire life. I often joke about how I must have been the only poor kid in the country because my mom would NEVER spend that much for "butter" when that yellow stick of fat for $0.39 worked JUST fine!! icon_biggrin.gif If it was yellow and you spread it on toast, then we called it butter.




You must be my long lost sister! icon_lol.gif Sounds like we had the same mother. My mom even had a special tiny spatula that she used to scrape down mayo and jelly jars to get every last bit. Of course she had 7 kids so I guess every little bit helped! Unless we were gonna go out in the middle of the night, steal milk from a cow and churn it ourselves, we got yellow fat too! My kids still get yellow fat but at least I have progressed enough to get them the whipped kind with extra vitamins! icon_biggrin.gif

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