Cardboard Between Cake Layers

Decorating By chelleb1974 Updated 31 Aug 2009 , 4:50am by chelleb1974

chelleb1974 Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:12pm
post #1 of 12

Hi all! Been a long time since I posted a question, but I am in need of some help. I know I've seen this here before, but am drawing a complete blank, lol.

I am doing a 5 tier stacked wedding cake and don't want to just put the plain cardboard cake rounds between the tiers. My question is how the heck do I cover the cardboard rounds??

I have access to cardboard rounds with a waxy coating on one side, and my only thought so far is to cover the 'raw' side of the waxed coated ones but not sure what to cover them with. I though of using two cardboards and putting them 'raw' side to 'raw' side, but the border between the tiers is a small piped bead border. I'm not sure the piped border will cover that much cardboard.

Any and all suggestions are welcomed and appreciated!

Thank you all!!!

11 replies
Kellbella Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:26pm
post #2 of 12

Why not plain cardboard?

bbmom Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:35pm
post #3 of 12

I've always used them plain and had no problems, not sure why you'd cover them??? You could cut a piece of waxed paper to fit and lay that under the "raw" side though if you wanted.

alanaj Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:45pm
post #4 of 12

You could just use Press N' Seal to cover it.

JenniferMI Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 3:00pm
post #5 of 12

I completely cover them in regular aluminum foil....

Jen icon_smile.gif

CakeRx Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 3:05pm
post #6 of 12

I've had this dilemma also; I don't like bare cardboard touching my cake! icon_sad.gif The easiest solution is the press n seal wrap or regular aluminum foil. Quicker than fanci-foil for small round cardboards and no tape involved.

bisbqueenb Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 3:06pm
post #7 of 12

The 'problem' with covering them is IF the server uses one of the serrated cake knives, it shreds the material you used to cover the boards....especially tinfoil! Cake boards are made for using 'as is' for cakes, so that is how I use them....no covering ever!

CakeRx Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 3:09pm
post #8 of 12

I agree with the serrated knife scenario! I always let the person who receives the cake know what is covering the board. Haven't had any problems so far. Press n Seal or Saran wrap is what I use most often.

chillebrandt Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 3:22pm
post #9 of 12

Although I have used cardboard between layers as that is how I was taught ... I have started using the cake plates between layers. Although it is a bit more costly, I feel the price of the cakes more than make up for the added expense.

chelleb1974 Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:00am
post #10 of 12

Thank you all for your input! I was at a Fantasy Football Draft for most of the day so I couldn't check in to see your answers!


Quote:
Originally Posted by chillebrandt

Although I have used cardboard between layers as that is how I was taught ... I have started using the cake plates between layers. Although it is a bit more costly, I feel the price of the cakes more than make up for the added expense.




This is what I thought of this afternoon - glad to know someone else agrees!

I don't like the thought of the cake on the cardboard with no covering because the cardboard could get soggy/gross.

Thank you all again!
~Chelle

indydebi Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:37am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by chelleb1974

....because the cardboard could get soggy/gross.



Not true.

This is probably the one topic that I reply to over and over. I'd love to know how this myth got started that cake cardboards will get "soggy" and practically disintegrate.

They are cardboards ... not rice paper. The may absorb the grease from the icing, but they do not get 'soggy' and disintegrate.

I assemble my cakes on uncovered cake cardboards on Thursday for a Saturday wedding. I usually cut most of my cakes at the wedding so I see the cardboards firsthand. When I disassemble the cakes, the cardboard is plenty sturdy enough to hold the weight of the cake.

This is also why I strongly encourage cakers to cut at least 3 of their own wedding cakes a year. It adds to your credibility when you have the cake cutting experience and you know firsthand how your assembly works from the cutting end of the process.

chelleb1974 Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:50am
post #12 of 12

Thank you Indydebi - I never realized that the cardboard didn't soggy. I just assumed it did because cake and icing would be on it. This is the first wedding cake I'll be doing (to be served, the others have been for competitions) and I may end up cutting the cake.


~Chelle

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