Am I In For A Beating?

Business By kellertur Updated 31 Aug 2009 , 4:34pm by SUELA

kellertur Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 12:58am
post #1 of 14

I delivered a wedding cake today, that came out really well. However, I didn't torte each layer (my cakes are really hard to torte, they are really moist/delicate) I just use extra filling. Does anyone ever NOT torte wedding cakes? Does it matter what the INSIDE of a cake looks like?
Also:
She asked for:
8" red velvet w/ v bc
12" choc w/ staw preserves
14" van w/ v bc... (Then wrote in email "with van BC between two cakes)
To me that means: between each 14" layer.

Do you think she meant preserves AND bc on top of each other? She's been almost impossible to reach by phone or email...

They are very nice, but were over a week late with thier first 1/2 of the total, but on time for the final. I gave them a discounted rate because my per serving went up after they made thier deposit, so they saved $150.00.
If she complains, should I offer partial refund if it was my mistake?

Thank you... feeling pretty foolish right now.

13 replies
sadsmile Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:06am
post #2 of 14

She asked for:
8" red velvet w/ v bc
12" choc w/ staw preserves
14" van w/ v bc

The top and bottom tiers with BC that is two cake. Teirs to us but cakes or even layers to muggles. LOL Sounds like you got it right to me.

OfficerMorgan Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:08am
post #3 of 14

I think that if you just put preserves between the cake and no buttercream that it isn't a good idea. A cake with preserves needs to be torted and have the buttercream as well. IMHO.

Mindy1975 Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:17am
post #4 of 14

I think torting is a personal decision that is made by each baker. It is something that can give you a signature style and separate you from some of the other bakers. I personally try to torte every layered cake that I do just to go that extra mile and make myself stand out from the grocery store bakeries and distinguish myself from the other bakeries that use cheap pre-baked cakes and icings, etc. Guests at weddings are just so delighted to get all that good flavor from three layers of filling instead of just one. Especially if it is a different flavor that just the buttercream that was used to just ice the outside of the cake. I'm not trying to down talk your method or anything at all.....just explaining my reasoning for torting! icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:17am
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by OfficerMorgan

I think that if you just put preserves between the cake and no buttercream that it isn't a good idea. A cake with preserves needs to be torted and have the buttercream as well. IMHO.




That's what I usually do, too, but I've had clients specifically ask for only preserves, no buttercream. Whatever, if they're paying me I'll give them only preserves!

indydebi Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:30am
post #6 of 14

I'd never heard of torting until I came to CC. 50 yeas of living and the only torted cakes I'd seen were magazines. My wedding cakes are 2-layers of cake with 1-layer of filling, standard. Once in awhile I'll tort it at the bride's request or for a special effect (i.e. my strawberry shortcake wedding cakes).

maisyone2 Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 1:55am
post #7 of 14

IMHO, you did exactly what she asked for. Each tier consisted of two layers of cake with either the preserve in between or your buttercream. You actually created a TWO LAYER TORTE.


[b]Merriam-Webster's Dictionary definition:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte

NO WHERE DOES IT SAY IT'S MORE THAN ONE LAYER. A torte by definition is a single layer cake.


Having defined that........When I have someone order from me and they don't understand "cake lingo", I educate them so we are on the same page. Makes the entire ordering process easier for all parties involved.

I explain that two layers of cake with a filling/frosting in between is a two layer torte or cake. If they want three layers of cake with filling/frosting between, that is a three layer torte or cake. Four layers of cake.....and so on. I also explain that the more layers there are, the thinner each layer is. I go on further to explain that each unit can be called either a cake, a torte or a tier. I go one more step and tell them that when referring to a cake as a tier, it is primarily because it is a part of a wedding cake or multi-cake arrangement.

I know that some people will never get it no matter how simply it is explained, but at least you will have tried to help them understand what it is they are buying.

And as a Wilton Instructor, I do take the time to go through this explanation during the first night of Course I. I figure the people take the class to learn about cake decorating, they need to understand "cake lingo"

Gayle

mkolmar Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:55am
post #8 of 14

I now torte my cakes, but that's me. If I couldn't torte them because of the cake I'm using being to delicate, then no, I wouldn't torte. Why try and make a mess, costing time and money and a heck of a lot of hassle.

I think it sounds like you did what she asked for. It sounds like she just wanted filling in between 2 layers of cake.
I more than likely wouldn't offer anything if there was a misunderstanding because you tried to contact them and couldn't. Also, they are already saving $150. That's more money that could have been in your pocket to go to that sweet little girl of yours.
I have no doubt you did what she wanted though. Your a pro and you got it covered.

kellertur Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 6:20pm
post #9 of 14

Ok, I just don't want anyone telling me I ruined their wedding day because I didn't torte a cake or mindread. I'm a bit too accomodating, so I need to re-evalute my methods for pleasing customers. I allowed two wedding customers to be over a week late with payments, even after reminder emails and phone calls. It doesn't exactly inspired respect, huh?

Thank you Debi, for telling me you don't always torte wedding cakes. I've torted Dessert cakes before, because they pay more for "more" fillings. My fillings/icings aren't cheap due to ingredients.

thanks everyone... I hope she doens't send an angry email when the honeymoon is over.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 6:25pm
post #10 of 14

I'm with Indy I never torted as a rule till I got online. And the joy of the bride being ambiguous with her instructions is that you could do it any way you want and still get it right.

icon_biggrin.gif No worries.

Loucinda Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 8:00pm
post #11 of 14

I personally don't like the torted cakes (I am not one who even really likes fillings/icings with cake) so I only do it when it is specifically requested.

cakesweetiecake Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 2:30pm
post #12 of 14

I dont think it would be a big deal as far as the torting goes. It's a shame that she couldnt have cleared this up prior to the wedding. It would have been less aggravation for you! LOL!

littlecake Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:19pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I'm with Indy I never torted as a rule till I got online. And the joy of the bride being ambiguous with her instructions is that you could do it any way you want and still get it right.

icon_biggrin.gif No worries.




ditto....no worries, i don't torte either...well maybe a couple of times....

i've never ever had anyone complain because of no torte....

i been doin this 12 years now.

SUELA Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 4:34pm
post #14 of 14

Honestly if they say you ruined their wedding by not torting a still great cake...they are lying.

I always torte personally, some dont'. I teach how to torte as well, but some students don't.

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