This Is Why I Won't Use "half" Or "full"

Business By indydebi Updated 29 Aug 2009 , 1:58pm by cylstrial

indydebi Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 10:41pm
post #1 of 18

I was in my walmart and walked over to check out their cakes. They had a "half" sheet for $29.88.

Except it's not a half sheet. It's an 11x15 (or maybe even 10x14 because it looked smaller than my 11x15's. I swear I'm taking a tape measure in with me next time!).

So if a customer compares pricing by asking "How much is your half sheet?", that customer is comparing the price of my 12x18 to walmart's 11x15. And if you don't know that, you'll not have the chance to educate the customer on "their" error.

Apples and Oranges, my friends! Apples and Oranges!

17 replies
littlecake Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 10:45pm
post #2 of 18

i've been wondering how much wally world is selling their wedding cakes for, did you happen to notice?

indydebi Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 10:50pm
post #3 of 18

This one doesn't have one on display and I didn't flip thru the book. (My Assignment America will be to find this out!)

However, one of their employees stopped in the shop a few days ago and she told me they require a 2-week notice for weddings (so even walmart weddings require a little planning!)

mazz Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 11:01pm
post #4 of 18

My local Walmart has two wedding cake displays and the wedding cake decorator did them both in buttercream. You can imagine how trashed they are by people touching them. Also the cakes come ready for you to set up on cardboard cake stands that are very flimsy. I was told the three tier wedding cake was $150 dollars. Sorry I don't know the sizes.

But the other week I went to a wedding that had a cute wedding cake and I was told it was from Walmart (not from the one above). It did have plastic columns. I was surprised by the taste it was actually fine. The bride was happy. She said she called the local cake decorator but never got any returned calls. But she was happy and that's all that matters.

sadsmile Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 11:24pm
post #5 of 18

Everything in the stores is not only costing more but the product is also shrinking. Haha. I noticed their sizes were on the small size.

playingwithsugar Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 11:26pm
post #6 of 18

Someone near to where I live sells her sheet cakes that way, too. A standard half-sheet, as we know it, she calls a 5/8 sheet. I tried to teach her otherwise, but she insisted that because a local vendor taught her that, it must be true.

Yokels. Ya gotta love'em.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

littlecake Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 11:35pm
post #7 of 18

they sell cake boxes and pads at certain sizes....wouldn't those be industry standard?

10 by 14 by 4 is called a 1/4 sheet box, isn't it?

cylstrial Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 12:32am
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I was in my walmart and walked over to check out their cakes. They had a "half" sheet for $29.88.

Except it's not a half sheet. It's an 11x15 (or maybe even 10x14 because it looked smaller than my 11x15's. I swear I'm taking a tape measure in with me next time!).

So if a customer compares pricing by asking "How much is your half sheet?", that customer is comparing the price of my 12x18 to walmart's 11x15. And if you don't know that, you'll not have the chance to educate the customer on "their" error.

Apples and Oranges, my friends! Apples and Oranges!




Ok - so I have no idea what size is a full and what size is a half. And I often think - I should know so that I can at least figure out what is going on. But I've heard a lot of people just go by how many slices each cake yields. It seems to me that it should just be standard. But it's not anywhere.

indydebi Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 1:37am
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Ok - so I have no idea what size is a full and what size is a half. And I often think - I should know so that I can at least figure out what is going on. But I've heard a lot of people just go by how many slices each cake yields. It seems to me that it should just be standard. But it's not anywhere.




Gosh I'm glad you popped in here and said that! It helps prove my point ... when those of us who actually live and breathe cakes have different views on what a full and half sheet is, then how can we expect cake civilian customers to know?

On the history of pan size. The commercial baking pans for a bakery are usually 18x24 or 18x26(full size sheet). If you cut those in half, you then have two 12x18's (half sheet). Cut those two half sheets in half and you have four 9x12's (quarter sheet). Anything else is a newly made up size.

But even knowing the history, I still kinda put customers on the spot. when they ask for pricing on a full sheet, I'll ask "how big is that?" and I swear, most of them say "I have no idea". I'll ask how many they need to serve and I get answers from 10 to 50. icon_eek.gif

HarleyDee Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 1:48am
post #10 of 18

I used to work in the WalMart bakery, (it's been about 3 years) but then our cakes started at $125. We only did cakes in buttercream, and then groom's cakes were just sheet cakes in chocolate. The only thing is they only have a few designs to pick from. The only things you can change are like, the colors of the roses.

I always kinda liked the taste of their cakes (because they were moist when they were fresh) but I didn't like not knowing how long it had been since they had actually been baked.

LaBellaFlor Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 2:39am
post #11 of 18

I have noticed that full size sheet cakes are not what they were about 10 years ago. They are definetly smaller.

auntmamie Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 2:52am
post #12 of 18

This is exactly why I have sheets listed in inches, not full/half/third/quarter. It is way too interpretive.

HarleyDee Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 2:52am
post #13 of 18

If you really want to see how products have shrunk while the price has stayed the same (or increased) look at the Cadbury Egg. They used to be bigger than XL chicken eggs. Now they're looking more like mockingbird eggs icon_biggrin.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 3:05am
post #14 of 18

Did you see where Cadbury denied that and then some celebrity brought his "collection" out. He's kept frozen Cadbury's over the very long years and laid them out for size comparison. Of course Cadbury apologized and changed their statement.

Kitagrl Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 3:06am
post #15 of 18

I don't at all...I simply use the size (11x15) and then state how many the cake serves.

Anyway I don't do alot of sheets...if I do, its often underneath a 3D cake to save money if they need lots of servings. The other day a lady was like "Can you just put it on top of a half sheet or something?" I had to explain that it takes measurements (of the 3D cake going on top, in this case a guitar) and guest count, and THEN I can inform her what size of sheet she will need, and how much the cake will cost.

littlecake Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 4:04am
post #16 of 18

everything is shrinking....coffee, ice cream, paint...instead of going up on the prices...they just shrink the stuff.

i can't tell you how many times peeps have called up ordering a full sheet, thinking it's a quarter.....

i now always ask the peeps how many they are feeding....sometimes with the full sheet, they'll say 10, (thinking its a quarter)....i sometimes ask em if they are feeding linebackers since it serves like 75....ha ha.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 7:03am
post #17 of 18

I think the reason non-cakers think that a 1/4 or 1/2 sheet is a full sheet is because of the pans most have used on their own. The standard 'big cake pan' for home use is about 9X13 - so that, to them, is a 'full sheet'.

Thanks, IndyDebi, for the lesson on cake pan history. Makes a lot more sense, now. Learn something new every day!!

cylstrial Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 1:58pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Ok - so I have no idea what size is a full and what size is a half. And I often think - I should know so that I can at least figure out what is going on. But I've heard a lot of people just go by how many slices each cake yields. It seems to me that it should just be standard. But it's not anywhere.



Gosh I'm glad you popped in here and said that! It helps prove my point ... when those of us who actually live and breathe cakes have different views on what a full and half sheet is, then how can we expect cake civilian customers to know?

On the history of pan size. The commercial baking pans for a bakery are usually 18x24 or 18x26(full size sheet). If you cut those in half, you then have two 12x18's (half sheet). Cut those two half sheets in half and you have four 9x12's (quarter sheet). Anything else is a newly made up size.

But even knowing the history, I still kinda put customers on the spot. when they ask for pricing on a full sheet, I'll ask "how big is that?" and I swear, most of them say "I have no idea". I'll ask how many they need to serve and I get answers from 10 to 50. icon_eek.gif





Thanks Indy! I'm gonna write that down so that I have the info if I ever need it! icon_biggrin.gif

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