First Petit Four Order

Decorating By emma_jada Updated 3 Sep 2009 , 7:36pm by Iva1976

emma_jada Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 4:52pm
post #1 of 44

Is it best to use pound cake with these? What kind of pan to use and how thick do you make them? do you use the pourable icing to decorate too?

43 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 4:55pm
post #2 of 44

When I've made them, I used WASC. I baked the cake in a rectangle pan, leveled it, torted it and added a layer of buttercream filling, then cut off the edges. I put a layer of buttercream on the top, then put waxed paper on top of that and froze the cake until solid. Once it was frozen, I cut it into squares and put them back in the freezer to take out a few at a time.

I covered mine with rolled fondant because of the look I was going for, but it's time-consuming, so if you have to do a lot or aren't charging a ton for them, then you might rather use pourable icing.

cylstrial Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 4:55pm
post #3 of 44

You definitely want to use poured fondant or chocolate to enrobe the cake.

Wesha Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 5:09pm
post #4 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by emma_jada

Is it best to use pound cake with these? What kind of pan to use and how thick do you make them? do you use the pourable icing to decorate too?




You should use a sheet cake pan. A 9x13 works well. Your petit fours will be 2 inches tall. I suggust using a pourable icing such as ganach on them. Let us see the final results when done.

Benisha

adriane Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 6:43pm
post #5 of 44

hey, so tell me if i am correct> are you saying to use buttercream, let it sit then use petite four icing over that???????

Loucinda Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 6:44pm
post #6 of 44

Make sure you charge an arm and a leg for those little monsters. I use a 12x18 jelly roll pan for mine. You can also enrobe them in ganache! icon_smile.gif
they love them - I just hate making them.

emma_jada Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:13pm
post #7 of 44

I called local bakeries to see what they charged for them and it was anywhere from $.60-$.90 so I said $1/piece.
I have the same question as above... I've never seen buttercream and then pourable icing. Is that what you are saying?
I have my grandmothers recipe for the icing and she split it into thirds (one for pouring, one for sweat pea and other for leafs). Do you have to thicken it to decorate with it?

Loucinda Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:16pm
post #8 of 44

I don't know pricing where you are, but I charge a minimum of $1.75 each - these little cakes take up sooo much time.

minicuppie Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:26pm
post #9 of 44

I use a pound cake recipe and divide between 3 sheet pans. When cool I layer them using a thin smear of whatever filling, leave the top naked. Cut into interesting shapes then dip in simple syrup (sometimes flavored, sometimes not). Let dry, place on cooling rack with plenty room between and then pour the fondant or ganache on to cover. Allow to dry then decorate. I really like to make them now that I have a system. Depending on ingredients I charge anywhere from $1 for simple smallish to $2.50 for a larger more "luxurious" serving. Of course they get a small discount if ordering more than 50 pieces.

Loucinda Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:33pm
post #10 of 44

Mini - why do you did them in the simple syrup? Is that to seal the crumbs?

Snoop4 Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:43pm
post #11 of 44

I used to work for a large Super Market, and we charged $2 a piece.... a little steep, but they are very time consuming. We did use a thin layer of buttercream before the chocolate. It helped keep them moist. I like almond past or raspberry in the layers. Good luck!

minicuppie Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 8:08pm
post #12 of 44

It is to seal the crumbs...I found the fondant just looked better than when I used jam or BC.

emma_jada Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 2:37am
post #13 of 44

what is simple syrup?

minicuppie Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 6:56pm
post #14 of 44

Simple syrup is just one part water to one part sugar...boil until clear. Let cool before using. It is up to you if you want to add any flavoring oil or liqueur or extract or whatever.

brincess_b Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 8:28pm
post #15 of 44

http://bakerella.blogspot.com/2009_07_01_archive.html
good post, and also links to other instructions which helped me a lot!
petit fours are lots of things, but the traditional ones (in the uk) are something like pound or maderia cake, filled with jam, topped with marzipan, and then poured fondant. basically how i did mine (although they turned out more mini cake sized that petit fours sized) and it was so delicious. i dont know if the syrup is traditional, but it makes a big tasty difference!
messy dipping them though! and handling thin layers of cake takes time and patience!
xx

cylstrial Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 10:24pm
post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snoop4

I used to work for a large Super Market, and we charged $2 a piece.... a little steep, but they are very time consuming. We did use a thin layer of buttercream before the chocolate. It helped keep them moist. I like almond past or raspberry in the layers. Good luck!






If you think $2 a piece is a little steep - you're going to have heart attack when you check this out. It's $42.75 for 12 of them (before shipping and tax). But man are they cute!

http://www.divinedelights.com/

minicuppie Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 2:12pm
post #17 of 44

Thanks for the link, bb. I had not been to Bakerella in forever! Gave me a chance to load her on my page.

CakeRx Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 2:40pm
post #18 of 44

brincess_b, thanks so much for the bakerella link! The link within her blog gives such a great tutorial on making traditional petit fours. So glad I read this thread.

emma_jada Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 3:26am
post #19 of 44

I knew it would be a challenge and also that things always look easier when someone else does it, but man... these little buggers are difficult. I have been practicing tonight and they turned out awful. They got better as I went along so hopefully tomorrow I can get even better. Also, anybody have any tips on getting true red color. I used Wilton no taste red and it turned out almost neon pink. Should I have just added more coloring?

minicuppie Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 11:32am
post #20 of 44

I refuse to using red icing for a base...I will however buy the little candy tube by CK products for a squiggle of color. Altho the fondant recipe I use calls for some of those colored "candy" disks if needed for a bit of color.

emma_jada Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 5:22pm
post #21 of 44

Do you just use a white base? or are you saying you just don't do red? The colors of the wedding shower are black and red, I guess I'll just do red/black accents on a white base. Any tips on getting a true black? Mine comes out dark grey most of the time. Icing coloring is not my specialty.

brincess_b Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 8:40pm
post #22 of 44

a lot of people prefer the brand americolor over wilton - stronger results with less dye.
xx

minicuppie Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 9:17pm
post #23 of 44

Check and see if you can find tube of CK in black. If not melt some dark chocolate candy disks and add black OIL to color. Water may make it sieze.

Loucinda Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:32am
post #24 of 44

You can also buy the tubes of wilton icing already made stuff to just drizzle - in black and red.

minicuppie Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 2:58pm
post #25 of 44

Is the Wilton product available at HL and Michaels? I have some coupons and need to stock up.

Loucinda Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 6:31pm
post #26 of 44

Yes, it is at Michaels for sure, I don't know about HL.

emma_jada Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 9:06pm
post #27 of 44

I spent all night Fri and Sat. practicing with these things! I took them to church today and they were gone before lunch even started (we eat at church every Sun). The second batch was definitely prettier than the first, but they all tasted good. Looks are important, but atleast they tasted good.

Loucinda Posted 30 Aug 2009 , 10:21pm
post #28 of 44

Now you understand the reasoning behind "I hope you charge a lot for those little buggars!" icon_wink.gif

emma_jada Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 12:19am
post #29 of 44

Completely understand. It will definitely be more than $1/piece next time.

Shirlcantuck Posted 31 Aug 2009 , 1:23am
post #30 of 44

Thanks for posting all the different links and info. Based on what I have seen and read, THIS IS A LOT OF WORK!
My question is --has anyone use the simple surgar on carved cakes to deal with the crumbs? Does it cause the cake to be hard? does the sugar create a crust?

Thanks!

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