Overwhelmed W/info/need A Starting Point?!

Decorating By mangospectacular Updated 28 Aug 2009 , 2:45pm by LaBellaFlor

mangospectacular Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 2:03pm
post #1 of 12

I love baking but I feel like I'm inbetween being a novice and intermediate baker. My best friend and I are discussing slowly starting our own cake/cupcake home business. I have total faith that we can do this and we are both really creative but I feel like I need a jumping off place to start learning/practicing. I have been reading these boards for days and have learned a lot but wonder how you all learned your craft..

Is there a book/DVD/any reading you suggest I start with? Or any advice in general would be appreciated.

We are taking some Wilton classes in the next two weeks, so maybe that'll give us a crash course.

Thank you so much! I am in awe of the things I've been seeing on this site. =D

11 replies
Makeitmemorable Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 3:14pm
post #2 of 12

Hi There Mangospectacular,

Firstly, welcome to CC - if you are interested in cake decorating, you got the right place.

I have had no formal training other than having a lady show me how to cover a cake with fondant 3 yrs ago. Once I had the feel for that, I started making cakes. I read some Debbie Brown Books and Lindy Smith - they were my two favourites but I love novelty/carved cakes. I have researched on the internet to watch people and worked out a lot myself. I guess it depends on the type of cakes you want to make but I have seen on some threads on here a DVD that you can purchase in there they give you demonstrations.

With every cake you create, you will teach yourself one more thing every time.

I am sure if you are creative and willing to try, you will have no problems.

Good luck, I am quite sure you will get some great information to get you started.

I would love to be able to tell you where to train but I am a little far away icon_rolleyes.gif .

Best wishes for cake happiness

Lcubed82 Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 3:35pm
post #3 of 12

This site is a must! Check your local library for books. You Tube is wonderful. Google techniques, terms, [ictures, etc. I took all the Wilton Classes, but have learned so much additionally from the Internet, and in brainstorming with a friend.

I am trying to decide if I want to take the Wilton classes again, from a different teacher, just to see a different take on the Wilton way. Maybe if they have some 1/2 price deals I will!

mangospectacular Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 3:44pm
post #4 of 12

Thanks so much for the replies and welcome! I will make sure to use all those resources to start training myself.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/static?page=wilton_cake_decorating

They are doing a 50% off classes right now for the month of September! =)

tiggy2 Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 3:53pm
post #5 of 12

The best DVDs you can get are from sugarshack. www.sugaredproductions.com She takes you step by step through butter cream, stacking, fondant, boxes & bows and topsy turvy. Very inexpensive and informative. I've watched them all more then once and will watch them again.
Edited to correct website

brian1974 Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 4:11pm
post #6 of 12

agree sugarshacks dvds are excellent.
I also find youtube and watching ednas and lorraines how to's on there exceptionally helpful.
There is a wealth of information out there.
Personally from my point of view who had no experience baking before , i found that once you have the recipies down and have iced a few 10 inch and above cakes and covered them in fondant, then it gets easier if you are a " creative " type. getting the cakes general shape and keeping it held together was the hardest part for me.

JanH Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 5:25am
post #7 of 12
matthewkyrankelly Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 5:44am
post #8 of 12

Welcome.

Start making cakes for everyone. Make them bigger than they need to be. Make them ostentatious. Go nuts with cake making. Make a few mistakes.

Cupcakes, as I'm sure you have read, can be a bit of a hassle....to decorate. One cake or fifty cupcakes? I'll take the cake! Learn a half dozen specific decorations for cupcakes and nail those. Then you can sell them.

Not many people will pay $2 or $3 for a cupcake that looks like their Aunt Fanny made it. Get good at decorating. If you are motivated, it won't take long. Then you can expand your repertoire as you go along.

Lastly, be prepared to transport these little gems. It can be a royal PIA if you are not ready. If someone ordered 70 for next Saturday, how would you package them for the customer( expensive - could eat into profits) and/or get them delivered in one piece, without rolling around your car?

Lots to consider. Good luck.

indydebi Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 1:31pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mangospectacular

My best friend and I are discussing slowly starting our own cake/cupcake home business. ...Or any advice in general would be appreciated.




First, find out if running a home business is legal in your state.

Read the book by Michael GErber, "the e-Myth". Anyone who contemplates running a business needs to read this book.

If this is going to be a partnership, be totally upfront and clear about the expectation. Put it all in writing. I'd even suggest an attorney draw up partnership papers. Everything is easy in the beginning when you're friends .... then the business side of things starts interferring with the "fun" of running a business.

Read as much as you can on CC ... it's a gold treasure chest of information!

LaBellaFlor Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 2:19pm
post #10 of 12

Research and learn your craft. Taking the Wilton courses doesn't neccessary equal to getting to start a business. I can't tell you how many just graduated Wilton people I've met that turn around start a business...and then don't even what a swiss meringue buttercream is.

indydebi Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 2:29pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Research and learn your craft. Taking the Wilton courses doesn't neccessary equal to getting to start a business. I can't tell you how many just graduated Wilton people I've met that turn around start a business...and then don't even what a swiss meringue buttercream is.




Not only that, but the business side of things can be overwhelming .... payroll, taxes, bookkeeping, purchasing, negotiating with vendors, advertising (I think I hate advertising decisions more than I hate pricing decisions!), licensing, insurance, etc., etc.

Lots of folks start a business doing something they love (cake making, car repair, crafts, woodworking, hair salons, etc) but are overwhelmed by the business aspect of it. They're good at their craft ... but are unskilled in the office mgmt side.

LaBellaFlor Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 2:45pm
post #12 of 12

Yup, Indydebs right. I don't have payroll, cause it's just me, but all that licensing, registering and then my county does their taxes different. All HEADACHES! Ha,Ha, I don't do big advertising, no problem for me.

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