Cake Sticking To Pan

Decorating By nydivagirl Updated 26 Aug 2009 , 3:17am by Rylan

nydivagirl Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 6:09pm
post #1 of 9

As a newbie, I have problems with my cake coming out of my pans in one piece. I spray pans with Pam for baking. I test to make sure the cake is down by the toothpick method. After I take the cake out of the oven how long should I let the cake cool before I take it out of the pan. I find my cakes are always hard on the top, I use box cakes, Pillsbury sometimes Duncan Hines, what am I doing wrong.

8 replies
varika Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 6:19pm
post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by nydivagirl

As a newbie, I have problems with my cake coming out of my pans in one piece. I spray pans with Pam for baking. I test to make sure the cake is down by the toothpick method. After I take the cake out of the oven how long should I let the cake cool before I take it out of the pan. I find my cakes are always hard on the top, I use box cakes, Pillsbury sometimes Duncan Hines, what am I doing wrong.




1. Try lining the bottom of the pan with parchment paper when you spray. Spray the bottom, and the paper will hold still while you pour but not when you take the cake out. Spray the paper, and it'll come off the cake with no sticking at all.

2. For cakes that are hard on top, try turning down your oven. I don't cook higher than 325 degrees for any cake. It takes longer, though you should always start with your minimum time and check to avoid nasty surprises. You can also use bake-even strips or towel strips, either or soaked in water--it helps your cake bake more evenly and also makes the air in the oven a little more humid, which helps the cake stay a little moister as it bakes.

3. The earliest I take my cakes out is when the pan is barely cool enough to handle without the oven mitt. I have left them in the pan as long as overnight--covered, after they were cool enough to not melt plastic wrap, of course. With the parchment paper method, I don't have any problems with stickage to the bottom, and a butter knife handles any side-stickage I get with little to no damage.

CakeRx Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 6:22pm
post #3 of 9

nydivagirl, we've all been there! First of all, stop using Pam. Though there are many ways to prepare your pans, it sounds like you might want to switch to shortening and flour (the good old fashioned method). Here's what is foolproof for me: Take a papertowel, swipe it into shortening, and grease the bottom and sides of your pan. Add flour to the inside and shake, tilt, etc. to cover it fully inside. Shake out excess flour. I also put parchment in the bottom of my pans to prevent the bottom from sticking. If you are using a heating core, do the same to it (shortening and flour). Your cake is done when a tester (long, thin cheap metal thing in cake stores) comes out clean near the middle of the pan. Depending on your cake size, a toothpick may not be long enough to accurately test "doneness". Most cakes are a little hard on top and are routinely leveled. This will eliminate the hard top and give you a nice, flat surface to decorate on. You can either use the knife and turntable method, the dental floss and toothpick method, a Wilton cake leveling tool, or any other way that is suggested to you. Depending on the size of your cake, let it cool for at least 10 minutes. Some people let theirs cool completely. It depends on the kind of cake (some are heavier, etc. and will not fall as easily). If using boxed ix, Pillsbury tends to taste better and is moister. I sure hope I helped you. Caking is fun, relaxing , and a wonderful createive outlet. As you progress, it will be fun for you to go through your photos to see how much you've learned! Have fun and welcome to CC!

jensenscakes Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 11:04pm
post #4 of 9

I love using the parchment paper since I've started using it I have always had my cakes come out perfect. It takes a little more time but it's worth it to not worry if your cake is going to come out of the pan.

LittleLinda Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 11:30pm
post #5 of 9

Pam is not meant for baking. You probably can spray with Pam then coat with flour. I, myself, use wax paper on the bottom of my pans, I sprinkle a little flour on the bottom first just in case the wax paper will stick to the pan. I do not grease the sides. I always use baking strips.

CakeRx Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 2:53am
post #6 of 9

Baking strips are something I like to use, too. I find that they make a bigger difference when using my Wilton pans vs. my MagicLine ones. The MagicLine seem to heat better overall without much help.

Rylan Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 3:17am
post #7 of 9

I use a mixture of equal amounts of flour, shortening and oil (mix it to a paste). I let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes and it comes out perfectly.

Rylan Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 3:17am
post #8 of 9

I use a mixture of equal amounts of flour, shortening and oil (mix it to a paste). I let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes and it comes out perfectly.

Rylan Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 3:17am
post #9 of 9

I use a mixture of equal amounts of flour, shortening and oil (mix it to a paste). I let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes and it comes out perfectly.

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