Sticking A Fondant / Gumpaste Bow On The Side Of The Cake

Decorating By MissCakeCrazy Updated 26 Aug 2009 , 7:49pm by CrazyBaker28

MissCakeCrazy Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 11:53am
post #1 of 18

I have done a fondant and gumpaste bow recently and want to try a design with a bow attached to each side of 4 tiers. I can't imagine it ever sticking on as its so heavy. If I were to put royal icing at the back, it will fall of straight away. How do I do it?

17 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 12:09pm
post #2 of 18

I would like to know, too! Clicking on watch for replies!!

lapazlady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 12:16pm
post #3 of 18

You might try using a "glue" made of gum paste and a bit of water. You may have to support the bow with hidden spaghetti pieces. Use one hand to place the bow and another to poke in a short piece of spaghetti in 3 places (loop left, right and center). HTH

Jaimelt76 Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 12:35pm
post #4 of 18

I used melted chocolate and held the bow until the chocolate set. It was my first time with a bow and no idea how to do it and this worked.

lapazlady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 12:37pm
post #5 of 18

Melted chocolate is an excellent "glue". And, for sure, you have to hold the bow in place until the chocolate is set.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 12:54pm
post #6 of 18

I have one to do and they have specified no chocolate - not even white chocolate due to a family member's allergy. What are some other options?

lapazlady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 1:24pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTFundraiser

I have one to do and they have specified no chocolate - not even white chocolate due to a family member's allergy. What are some other options?




Take a bit of gum paste and mash it around in a tiny bit of water, you want a paste. This will do the job. You may have to support (spaghetti sticks) the bow for a while, to allow the glue to harden up enough to support the weight of the bow. HTH

2SchnauzerLady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 1:44pm
post #8 of 18

lapazlady - will the gumpaste glue stick to BC? The cake will be BC with fondant decorations. The fondant will be in narrow stripes.

addietx Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 2:07pm
post #9 of 18

You can use a skewer, toothpicks etc in a place where a tiny hole will not show. You can take them out after you feel that it has "bonded" with the BC or leave them in for transportation then take them out. If the bow is extremely heavy leave the supports in and tell the cake cutter to take them out before serving.

2SchnauzerLady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 2:16pm
post #10 of 18

Thanks, Addietx and lapazlady

addietx Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 2:17pm
post #11 of 18

use a little BC as glue, hold in place for a couple of seconds then place skewer, toothpick etc as support - take out before serving

lapazlady Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 3:51pm
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTFundraiser

lapazlady - will the gumpaste glue stick to BC? The cake will be BC with fondant decorations. The fondant will be in narrow stripes.




Use buttercream for your stickum. Small decorations will stay on just fine.

Malakin Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 12:56am
post #13 of 18

I attached fondant and gumpaste to fondant covered cake with melted chocolate, but, I also attached some pretty heavy pieces to a bc cake with a little tylose powder mixed in water. It's stickier than gumpaste glue and worked really good for me.

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 1:05am
post #14 of 18

I'm curious too. Would royal icing work okay?

tonedna Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 1:12am
post #15 of 18

The first thing I would say is make sure that your fondant or gumpaste is not too thick. That will help with the bow not being too heavy.

Over Fondant the chocolate works well. As for buttercream you need more support. If you let your bow dry beforehand, make holes with a toothpick in an area in the center where is hidden so you can insert toothpicks
through that hole into the cake, then seal it with buttercream or royal icing.

I do my bows last minute so I can just insert the toothpicks last minute and fix the shape of the bow as I work with it.
But some people get intimidated by this.
Good luck!
Edna icon_smile.gif

catlharper Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 1:33am
post #16 of 18

I just want to say thank you for all those who replied..I'm not the poster but am learning more every day just by reading the questions and the replies! Putting in toothpicks is such a "duh" idea that I almost actually smacked my head when I read it! Well, OF COURSE! LOL! I'm planning on several side bows for a cake coming up in Feb (daughters b'day) and now I have the "tools" to do it right! Thanx!

ceshell Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 6:25am
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTFundraiser

I have one to do and they have specified no chocolate - not even white chocolate due to a family member's allergy. What are some other options?



For what it's worth, I just bought Nestle white chocolate chips the other day...today I looked at the bag and realized they are NOT "white chocolate chips" but rather "White Morsels". The difference? There is NO chocolate product in them whatsoever. (I'm taking them back to the store tomorrow lol).

White chocolate is made from cocoa butter, which is a true cocoa bean byproduct, so therein would lie the allergy. Nestle white morsels are made with palm kernel oil. You might want to investigate if that makes them safe for people w/chocolate allergies - I cannot imagine why it wouldn't since they aren't chocolate! icon_rolleyes.gif

Anyway you have many other possible solutions but I wanted to point that out. thumbs_up.gif

CrazyBaker28 Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 7:49pm
post #18 of 18

Technically, no white chocolate is considered true chocolate.

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