Scrollwork Tips

Decorating By lstalder Updated 24 Aug 2009 , 2:33pm by khoudek

lstalder Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:44pm
post #1 of 11

I am making my daughter's wedding cake next weekend and she has asked for simple scrollwork. I've tried doing this and it looks horrible. Please help! (my first wedding cake!!)
thanks

10 replies
jimandmollie Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:13pm
post #2 of 11

I bought this set at Michaels for my first scrollwork cake.

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E30D891-475A-BAC0-51DF77778B7B0CDF&fid=3E32BDAD-475A-BAC0-5EF8EA589AD96C4F

It worked well and I felt better knowing I just had to trace the pattern. I hope that helps!

Loucinda Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:33pm
post #3 of 11

What I did to do my first scrollwork was to draw it out on paper first, and played with that - got my hands used to doing the design. Then I did it on the cake - I never had luck with the impression things, I did better just freehanding it.

indydebi Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:59pm
post #4 of 11

I'm betting that you're doing the scrolls slow, being careful, so you get them perfect? Moving your hand slow will make them look bad. You'll get better results if you move your hand faster. Less shaking, smoother lines.

Loucinda has a great idea..... draw them out on paper and practice. The faster you can trace them with your piping bag, the better they'll look. thumbs_up.gif

lstalder Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:05pm
post #5 of 11

Thanks for the ideas. My son in law to be is an artist and he is going to use a toothpick to lightly make the design on the cake so all I have to do is pipe over this. That's my problem, I'm not steady and it looks bad. I'll try going faster-maybe that will help.

What should my consistency be, should it be royal or BC with piping gel? Do I start with tip on cake and then lift up or pipe directly on?
thanks again

indydebi Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:10pm
post #6 of 11

I use just plain BC for everything. I do thin it a bit with some extra milk when doing lace and scrolls. I do it because it doesn't hurt my hands as much, and the work goes faster.

beenzee Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:12pm
post #7 of 11

I am by no means an expert, but getting better. I would suggest tilting the cake a bit. And keeping the tip off the cake, but letting the RI "fall" into place. Good luck!

Loucinda Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:14pm
post #8 of 11

Now, I think your tip has to touch slightly - so you have some control as to where the icing goes. If you are not touching the cake at all, it would be hard to control where it lands for the scrollwork. (that is what you want it to do when doing drop strings, but I like having control of it when I am doing the scrollwork)

Loucinda Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:25pm
post #9 of 11

Now, I think your tip has to touch slightly - so you have some control as to where the icing goes. If you are not touching the cake at all, it would be hard to control where it lands for the scrollwork. (that is what you want it to do when doing drop strings, but I like having control of it when I am doing the scrollwork)

Q-Squared Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 11:58am
post #10 of 11

I've done scroll work a few times -- using both buttercream and royal icing. I prefer royal icing. It just dries so much smoother and will hide some of the mistakes a shaky hand can make. Just be careful when transporting the cake, if you use RI. It can break off easily!

khoudek Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 2:33pm
post #11 of 11

I use either buttercream or royal, they both need to be thinned so the icing string doesn't break as you're piping. I find it much easier to use a small bag and hold it like I would a pencil or pen. Touch the tip down initially to secure the icing in place onto the cake and then hover about about 1/16", enough so the icing connects but doesn't drag through the cake icing ( does that make sense? ). And practice on a practice board at an incline as well. It is much different to pipe scroll on the sides verses the top of a cake.

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