I Just Can't Do Buttercream Roses!!!

Decorating By SarahEvans Updated 24 Aug 2009 , 5:32am by cakes_are_fun

SarahEvans Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:23pm
post #1 of 26

I am fairly new to cake decorating so I am still learning and experimenting with a lot of things. I have seemed to been getting the hang of everything then, came along roses! I have tried and tried and tried and TRIED!!!! but I just can't get it. I think it may be I keep getting the frosting consistency not right but I have no idea. Any tips?????

25 replies
Misdawn Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:33pm
post #2 of 26

Getting the frosting consistency right is the hardest part! Have you tried adding a little piping gel to your buttercream too? My roses never worked right either until my Wilton instructor told me to try adding about a tablspn of piping gel to a single batch of Wilton buttercream recipe.

SarahEvans Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 1:19am
post #3 of 26

So what is the best type of buttercream to use? Like crusting buttercream or just a regular buttercream recipe??

kricket Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 1:31am
post #4 of 26

I never got the hang of piped roses either---and I took the Wilton classes over 17 years ago. I know it would be a good thing for me to learn, but honestly, I've never "needed" to know how. No bride has ever ordered them on her cake. They seem to either want gumpaste roses or fresh ones.

vickymacd Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 1:48am
post #5 of 26

I like the regular Wilton recipe. BUT, when making roses, I use only Crisco. With frostings, I use a combo of Crisco and butter.

SarahEvans Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 1:59am
post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickymacd

I like the regular Wilton recipe. BUT, when making roses, I use only Crisco. With frostings, I use a combo of Crisco and butter.




Thanks for the tips! So you just completely omit butter...does this change the flavor much??

Jeff_Arnett Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:06am
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahEvans

So what is the best type of buttercream to use? Like crusting buttercream or just a regular buttercream recipe??




I've been decorating for 30 years now, but I vivdly remember the many hours it took learning to pipe a rose.

Now days, I work primarily in gum paste, but every once in a while, I do some piped flowers.

One of the hardest thing to me was getting icing stiff enough to stand up when piping petals without coming out all ragged on the edges.

Over the years, I perfected my "rose icing" and will share it here with you.

The best way to make this icing is with an old-fashioned two beater mixer....not a kitchenaid type....beats in too much air. If you don't have a stand mixer, a hand-held will work too.

ROSE ICING

Place 1 1/2 cups vegetable shortening [used to be Cricso, but since they reformulated, I just use a store brand all vegetable...if you have hi-ratio that's even better!] and add 2 teaspoons clear vanilla in mixer bowl and mix on low speed a few seconds to soften.

Sift together a 2 pound bag of powdered sugar and 1/2 cup cake flour [all-purpose is ok if you don't have cake flour].

Heat some water to near boiling....should be steaming and too hot to touch!

Add all the sugar to the mixing bowl at one time and add 1/3 cup of the really hot water.

Mix on low, scraping bowl, until the icing is smooth. Color as desired.

Cover the bowl and allow the icing to stand several hours to overnight before using. If too stiff to pipe, slowly stir in a teaspoon or two of additional very hot water.

Doesn't require refrigeration.....will last several weeks in a sealed room temperature container.

In a hurry....pipe flowers and pop in the freezer until solid.

If you have more time, flowers made from this icing may be air dried for 2 to 3 day...makes them really easy to work with, but they remain soft enough to eat on the inside....much better than royal icing!

ape74 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:06am
post #8 of 26

I am EXTREMELY new at this too and I could never do the rose. It wasn't until someone here told me to try it in royal icing and it worked out great! Be careful though because the first time I made RI, it was way to thin so I had to go back and fix it which was a drag because I had to get it all out of my decorating bags. Anyway, this may be why I haven't done it again, but you should give it a shot if you really want to use roses for your next cake project.

vickymacd Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:07am
post #9 of 26

Well, Crisco is Crisco. Problem is, Crisco has that transfat crap now. Walmart brand does not. There is something about the transfat that is causing a lot of people grief with their frostings. I really haven't found too much of a problem.
But, in answer to your question, it just doesn't have a bit of buttery taste.
But if you're using them for roses, chances are no one is going to really eat the roses anyway. Omitting the butter and using all Crisco gives a firmer frosting.
Also, Wilton's recipe also calls for Meringue powder. I use it when I feel like it. I don't see any difference in the frostings. Maybe the experts can tell you, but I only see it as a way of the teachers having to sell it to us in their classes by Wilton.

The Wilton frosting is the only one I use and it's never failed me!

Kandy4283 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:16am
post #10 of 26

I do alot of rose cakes!!! And the only frosting that I use is my decorators frosting! It works wonders and I can't say that I have ever had an issue with it. If you want that reciepe pm me and i will get it to you! It's always worth a shot and it had never let me down!

mjk350 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:26am
post #11 of 26

Kandy4283: Is it possible that I could get a copy of the receipe also? I would love to be able to do a decent rose. I would greatly appriciate it.

SarahEvans Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:27am
post #12 of 26

Thanks so much for all the tips! I am definately going to try them out. Hopefully it will work...if not I just wasn't meant to make roses! Thanks again!

Jeff_Arnett Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:35am
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahEvans

Thanks so much for all the tips! I am definately going to try them out. Hopefully it will work...if not I just wasn't meant to make roses! Thanks again!




Don't be so hard on yourself....roses are NOT easy to master. Have you watched any of the tutorials on making a buttercream rose on www.youtube.com ? I know there are several on there and watching someone else to it sometimes makes it much easier to learn. DON'T GIVE UP!

SarahEvans Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:45am
post #14 of 26

I have watched some today...they zip right through making one and make it look SO EASY!!!

varika Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:01am
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickymacd

Well, Crisco is Crisco. Problem is, Crisco has that transfat crap now. Walmart brand does not. There is something about the transfat that is causing a lot of people grief with their frostings. I really haven't found too much of a problem.




Actually, it's the lack of trans fats. I suspect they bind better in the icing than non trans fats, since trans fats are unsaturated, which means they have places where they can bond with other things chemically.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:40am
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahEvans

I have watched some today...they zip right through making one and make it look SO EASY!!!




With practice and time, you too will be "zipping right through them!"

Kandy4283 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:03am
post #17 of 26

Here is the recipe for my roses! I got alot of pm's for it and i did send this to them of whom wanted it, but I thaught that I would just leave it here to so if others are wanting to try it as well!! Also, this is in my recipes under my name, so if you ever wanna save it to "your recipe" favorites, that may be easier for ya to!! Good Luck!!



This reciepe has never ever let me down! Give it a try!
3 TBSP milk or water (I prefer milk)
pinch of salt
2 tsp clear vanilla
1 1/2 tsp butter extract
1 1/2 cup crisco shortening ( or flavor desired
1 lb powder sugar

*I mix the first 4 ingredients together first before adding the rest so it does not clum up.
*Add crisco with above ingredients.
*Now slowly add the powder sugar

****You can double this reciepe, and normally this is what I do to make a 1/4 sheet with decorations or even a half sheet with decorations!

mjk350 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:13am
post #18 of 26

Kandy4283: Thank you so much for posting this. I will give it a try.

CakeJediChic Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:28am
post #19 of 26

Hi Sarah! I had the same problem but it was my consistency! I made it pretty stiff and now they are much better! Now I'm going to try the recipe listed above. Good luck from a fellow Oklahoman!

Kandy4283 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 4:29am
post #20 of 26

your so welcome! thumbs_up.gif

tigerhawk83 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 5:39pm
post #21 of 26

My instructor recommends that you buy the small tub of Wilton stiff consistency ready to use decorator icing - she doesn't think you can make icing stiff enough at home - apparently she always buys for flowers even though she makes for everything else. Who knows.

Another idea - which direction are you turning the nail? I started out trying to turn the nail OUT [toward my finger tip] and had lots of trouble. I tried turning the nail IN [toward my palm] and my roses look 10X better - and I'm a newbie too.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 5:44pm
post #22 of 26

[quote="tigerhawk83"] she doesn't think you can make icing stiff enough at home -

Never heard of such an idea......

Kandy4283 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 7:28pm
post #23 of 26

gotta agree with ya...never heard such a thing! lol and she is teaching?

varika Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 7:51pm
post #24 of 26

I found something that works for me--make your centers on your waxed paper squares. Put them aside to crust up, or pop them in the freezer for a few moments. Then you can pull them back out and the centers are all nice and firm, and you can pipe the petals with a consistency that doesn't leave you feeling like your arthritic grandmother on a rainy day.

SarahEvans Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 8:37pm
post #25 of 26

Thanks for all the wonderful advice and recipes! Been working on my roses all day and I think I just need more practice but I feel confident. Right now I'm just taking a break before I go crazy. Thanks again!

cakes_are_fun Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 5:32am
post #26 of 26

Just a word of encouragement, I have been teaching Wilton classes for over almost 2 years now, took the classes myself in 2006, I still don't "zip right through" a rose! They are not easy and there are about as many different ways to make them as there are cake decorators. Don't stress yourself out, practice is key but remember t have FUN while you are working on it!

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