Help! Cake Slipped Off To One Side Of The Cake Board!!!

Decorating By ylescu Updated 23 Aug 2009 , 9:51am by ylescu

ylescu Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 6:03am
post #1 of 20

I hope someone can give me a solution to this. I was bringing a stacked cake to a friend's house for a little get together. The cake was a small 3 tier cake totally iced in IMBC, each tier doweled with separate boards with 1 center dowel running through all tiers.

Anyway, the place is relatively close by but you need to pass thru several uphill/downhill roads. When I got there the whole cake was still standing straight but the WHOLE CAKE slid to one corner of the square cake board!!! And I was driving really carefully!

Needless to say the icing on the side of the cake got squished onto the cake box because of the slipping. Good thing this wasn't a paying job, my friends didn't mind one bit, but of course I did icon_redface.gif

How do I avoid this from happening in the future? Any ideas? Do I need to lay the cake on top of thick foam core as a base and have the center dowel pierce thru to attach it to the base?

HELP!!!!

19 replies
xstitcher Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 6:46am
post #2 of 20

Did you maybe forget to put some bc on the cakeboard to glue the cake to it?

madgeowens Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 7:02am
post #3 of 20

So it sounds like the entire cake intact, on a cake board, slid across the big cake board, is this right? If so, I would try a small piece of the stuff you keep rugs from slipping on a smooth floor. If you mean the cake slipped off its cake board, then I agree, you need to paste it onto the board with butter cream. hth

Makeitmemorable Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 10:36am
post #4 of 20

You could put royal icing on the board before you add the first tier to ensure it sticks to the board.

Sorry to hear your story, hopefully no more

klat7292 Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 10:48am
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

So it sounds like the entire cake intact, on a cake board, slid across the big cake board, is this right? If so, I would try a small piece of the stuff you keep rugs from slipping on a smooth floor. If you mean the cake slipped off its cake board, then I agree, you need to paste it onto the board with butter cream. hth




This is what I normally do...(but sometimes I forget too!.... icon_redface.gif ) thumbs_up.gif

Good Luck in the future!

ylescu Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 11:05am
post #6 of 20

Actually I did put BC on the board before laying down the first tier, that's what's got me confused icon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

ylescu Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 11:10am
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

So it sounds like the entire cake intact, on a cake board, slid across the big cake board, is this right? If so, I would try a small piece of the stuff you keep rugs from slipping on a smooth floor. If you mean the cake slipped off its cake board, then I agree, you need to paste it onto the board with butter cream. hth




The entire cake itself slid to the upper right corner of the cake board (the cake board stayed put), and I did put a little BC underneath the cake. Do you think the BC was too soft to secure the cake? I was using IMBC so it wasn't a crusting BC icon_sad.gif

2SchnauzerLady Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:01pm
post #8 of 20

If you use a foam core type board, you can drive the center dowel down into that, and used the crusting BC to secure the cake - I did that with the last 2 tier I made, and before that, I used crusting buttercream only, but I've never transported anything more than 2 tiers. I also use the nonslip stuff.

GrandmaG Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:04pm
post #9 of 20

Was the center dowel through the cake board? That should have kept it secured. If not then I'm sure it was the frosting. That happened to me once. It was fine until it got in the hot car and I swore I would never use anything but a stiffer frosting again. They put it in the car before cooling it down and it was probably 100 degrees in there. He came back 5 minutes later and he said it slid when he came up to a stop sign. I had to decorate all over again.

ylescu Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:19pm
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTFundraiser

If you use a foam core type board, you can drive the center dowel down into that, and used the crusting BC to secure the cake - I did that with the last 2 tier I made, and before that, I used crusting buttercream only, but I've never transported anything more than 2 tiers. I also use the nonslip stuff.




What non-slip stuff? Could you maybe enlighten me more regarding that? Maybe I can use that in the future icon_biggrin.gif

GrandmaG Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 1:06pm
post #11 of 20

It's that drawer liner you can buy in the roll. Kind of a rubbery meshy material.

madgeowens Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 3:26pm
post #12 of 20

yes . in the rug aisle of walmart, there is a non skid mateial you buy to put under a rug so you sont slip....you can cut this for under a cake when transporting it, to keep it still.

I can;t understand the cake moving entirely off your board, that is weird..use more bc maybe

madgeowens Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 3:27pm
post #13 of 20

I would hammer stake all the way thru foam board myself

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 3:38pm
post #14 of 20

I would think a chilled cake might not be so prone do that.
I don't let my cakes take on the heat of outdoors.
I keep them climate controlled in boxes.

I mean I've done everything wrong at least once so that's why I
keep them chilled and protected now.

icon_biggrin.gif

Jeff_Arnett Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 6:53pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylescu

I hope someone can give me a solution to this. I was bringing a stacked cake to a friend's house for a little get together. The cake was a small 3 tier cake totally iced in IMBC, each tier doweled with separate boards with 1 center dowel running through all tiers.

Anyway, the place is relatively close by but you need to pass thru several uphill/downhill roads. When I got there the whole cake was still standing straight but the WHOLE CAKE slid to one corner of the square cake board!!! And I was driving really carefully!

Needless to say the icing on the side of the cake got squished onto the cake box because of the slipping. Good thing this wasn't a paying job, my friends didn't mind one bit, but of course I did icon_redface.gif

How do I avoid this from happening in the future? Any ideas? Do I need to lay the cake on top of thick foam core as a base and have the center dowel pierce thru to attach it to the base?

HELP!!!!




Some options:

1. Place the cake on a 1/2 inch thick foamcore board or regualr foil covered cake drum. Then pound the center dowel until it goes through the base.

2. Use a 1/2 inch masonite board. Drill a small hole in the center. Cut a 3/4 inch dowel to about 1-2 inches less that the total expected heigh of the cake. Drill a hole in the end of the dowel. Add a bit of wood glue to the dowel hole, then use a small screw to attach it to the masonite board. Prepare your tiered cake board by cutting a center hole big enough for the dowel to pass through, then impale your cakes down over the dowel...this method is super steady, especially for large tiered cakes.

3. Ice your base tier on a same sized cardboard or foam circle. Place a few pieces of double sided tape on the cake base board and set the base tier in place on it.

xstitcher Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:10pm
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylescu

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNTFundraiser

If you use a foam core type board, you can drive the center dowel down into that, and used the crusting BC to secure the cake - I did that with the last 2 tier I made, and before that, I used crusting buttercream only, but I've never transported anything more than 2 tiers. I also use the nonslip stuff.



What non-slip stuff? Could you maybe enlighten me more regarding that? Maybe I can use that in the future icon_biggrin.gif




Here's a pic:

http://www.stacksandstacks.com/shelf-liner-grip-it?id=176&sku=10338&utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase
http://www.ecrater.com/product.php?pid=4266232

grannys3angels Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 9:21pm
post #17 of 20

I buy the non-slip shelf liner at the Dollar Store for a $1.00 a roll. I love using it for my cake boxes and also placing it the floor board of my truck, to keep the cake box from sliding.

God Bless,
Sharon

ceshell Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 9:21am
post #18 of 20

For my IMBC cakes, I use either regular bc as glue on the board (I usually have leftovers in my freezer somewhere) or a wet glob of fondant, rolled thin. IMBC is so slippery, I don't trust it to work as glue!

BTW congrats on the fantastic doweling job though; I mean the fact that your whole cake could slide but remain completely intact speaks well for your support system icon_biggrin.gif

Mug-a-Bug Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 2:35pm
post #19 of 20

Hot glue is your friend. I put a glob of hot glue on my cake board before putting the bottom cake down. I don't trust frosting, I use real glue. Works great for me icon_razz.gif

Bummer about your cake, at least it happened when you weren't needing perfection, and now you know to come up with a better system thumbs_up.gif

ylescu Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 9:51am
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceshell

For my IMBC cakes, I use either regular bc as glue on the board (I usually have leftovers in my freezer somewhere) or a wet glob of fondant, rolled thin. IMBC is so slippery, I don't trust it to work as glue!

BTW congrats on the fantastic doweling job though; I mean the fact that your whole cake could slide but remain completely intact speaks well for your support system icon_biggrin.gif




I know! icon_biggrin.gif Atleast having the cake NOT topple over and keep its shape was a consolation for me!!!

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