Hope This Doesn't Sound Silly

Decorating By tab26852 Updated 25 Aug 2009 , 11:42pm by ceshell

tab26852 Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:32pm
post #1 of 25

Has anyone ever put a Laminated picture on a cake then put a border around it.I have a Anniversary cake to make and wanted to put a picture on it but the lady doesn't want the edible ink which I don't have anyway. Any ideas are welcomed.

24 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:34pm
post #2 of 25

I haven't personally done it, but I've seen other people do it. I think it would work fine.

DianeLM Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:39pm
post #3 of 25

I did it here. It's no big deal. icon_smile.gif
LL

Spoiled1 Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:57pm
post #4 of 25

I haven't done it, but sounds like a great idea!

Mug-a-Bug Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 11:19pm
post #5 of 25

I'm going to write that one down. Sounds like a great idea to me. icon_biggrin.gif

txnonnie Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 11:59pm
post #6 of 25

I did it on a book cake...in my photos.

LittleLinda Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:53am
post #7 of 25

I do it ALL THE TIME! Make sure you cut the plastic with a ridge around the picture sealed well, the first time i did it, I cut around the actual picture which left the paper edge exposed enough for grease to set in.

cylstrial Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 11:25pm
post #8 of 25

Interesting! I never would have thought to do that.

Thanks for the tip LittleLinda!

KathyTW Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 11:45pm
post #9 of 25

I did one on a cupcake cake after I got tired of fighting with my edible ink printer!
LL

Jeff_Arnett Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 12:18am
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tab26852

Has anyone ever put a Laminated picture on a cake then put a border around it.I have a Anniversary cake to make and wanted to put a picture on it but the lady doesn't want the edible ink which I don't have anyway. Any ideas are welcomed.




JUST MAKE SURE...

That when you trim the laminating plastic around the photo, don't cut to close....if the plastic isn't sealed together really well and you pipe a border around the image, moisture and grease can seep in by capillary action.....had it happen once. Other than that, I've done it many, many time with no problems.

Makeitmemorable Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:47am
post #11 of 25

Like you, my customer did not want edible icing, she wanted to keep the Chivas label however trying to get a laminated label to bend around a cake bottle and stay would have been impossible, In the picture I have attached, I did not actually laminate the label, I covered both sides in clear contact. That way it kept it flexible so I could attach it around the bottle - a laminated one would have been too rigid.

You laminated one will be fine.

Best of Luck
LL

Elise87 Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 12:09pm
post #12 of 25

Thanks for posting this question because i have been thinking of doing the exactly the same thing because i don't have an edible ink printer nor do i know where to get them printed plus i only wanted to print a very small photo

Anyhoo can i pop in a question......so is the laminate ok to put directly on buttercream as well as fondant then? Or do you put something extra underneath the photo?

Makeitmemorable Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 12:29pm
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett

JUST MAKE SURE...

That when you trim the laminating plastic around the photo, don't cut to close....if the plastic isn't sealed together really well and you pipe a border around the image, moisture and grease can seep in by capillary action.....had it happen once.




You can add them straight on to BC or fondant, as mentioned by "Jeff_Arenett, make sure it is still sealed when you trim the edges.

Good luck with that.
Kim

smitakasargod Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 8:45pm
post #14 of 25

I don't have an edible image printer so when I did my wine bottle cake I just rolled a very thin gumpaste sheet and put my label on that. Then I stuck it on to my cake.

leahk Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 9:02pm
post #15 of 25

I've printed the image onto a clear overhead projector sheet. The ink side is face up, so the ink has no contact with the cake. It only works with a white or very light colored cake.

sugarandslice Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 9:16pm
post #16 of 25

I've used a laminated photo on a cake with no prob.

Leahk, that idea of printing onto an OHP transparency is a great one. I hadn't thought of that. And it would be more flexible than a laminated pic too.
Thanks for the tip.
icon_smile.gif

leahk Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 4:17am
post #17 of 25

No problem!

LittleLinda Posted 24 Aug 2009 , 10:43pm
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makeitmemorable

I did not actually laminate the label, I covered both sides in clear contact. That way it kept it flexible so I could attach it around the bottle - a laminated one would have been too rigid.



That's an excellent idea too!
Here's a cute cake with laminated photos I just did this weekend.
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1444531

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 1:09am
post #19 of 25

Before I started doing my own cakes, I was getting them from the local grocery store. One year, my DD wanted a cartoon character on her cake - Atomic Betty. Unfortunately, Betty was so new on the scene, there was nothing out there (as far as cake toppers go). I asked the cake people if they would scan a photo, but they said because of copyright, No. I then asked if I provided a laminated photo, could they put that on. No problem. So I made up a cake topper that covered the whole thing, and they just piped shells around it to keep it down. DD still has that laminated picture on her wall.

ceshell Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 6:47am
post #20 of 25

FWIW contact paper is not considered food safe (there are a few threads on this - that info comes from the manufacturer itself). Since it's a flexible plastic it's got the dreaded phlalates in it I think (good grief don't make me look up the spelling on that one LOL). I use it for cake boards all of the time but my main cake is always on its own cake circle first. If I were to try it to cover an image with it for use directly on my icing, I would probably place it on some kind of barrier, whether parchment paper, a strip of fondant meant to be removed, etc., something that would keep it from coming in contact with my cake. JMO!

Not trying to start a debate about the safety of contact paper; just trying to make sure y'all know what the manufacturer says about that product icon_smile.gif

Elise87 Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 7:13am
post #21 of 25

yeh i would feel better about putting a piece of paper, baking paper or something underneath it too

weddingcake1 Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 8:25am
post #22 of 25

walmart will make edible images for you if you ever need one just take them the picture and they put it on frosting sheet for you cost 6.50.

LittleLinda Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 6:50pm
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceshell

FWIW contact paper is not considered food safe icon_smile.gif



Thanks. I missed those threads.

diane Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 6:54pm
post #24 of 25

wow...i've actually never heard of that until now! icon_confused.gif

ceshell Posted 25 Aug 2009 , 11:42pm
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by diane

wow...i've actually never heard of that until now! icon_confused.gif



Well I have to admit: "I read it on the Internet" (here, in fact) but at the time, the CCer emailed the manufacturer about it, and she pasted in the answer into the thread. They would not green-light her use of the stuff for food products. The part about the phthalates is a guess on my part based on what I know about what products phthalates are found in (specifically: flexible polyvinyl chlorides...which is what contact paper IS). It might be time for another call to the mfr to find out if the product is food safe now?! I rather doubt it based on its intended use (i.e. as a shelf-liner, book cover, laminating medium, etc.; none of my contact paper states that it should/could be used as a food prep or display tool), but you never know!

If I can ever track down that thread, I'll post a link icon_smile.gif

ETA: OK two bits of info. First, from Wikipedia, the explanation: "Because phthalate plasticizers are not chemically bound to PVC, they can easily leach and evaporate into food or the atmosphere. Phthalate exposure can be through direct use or indirectly through leaching and general environmental contamination. Diet is believed to be the main source of DEHP and other phthalates in the general population. Fatty foods such as milk, butter, and meats are a major source."

Next, the original thread. Wasn't lost in the crash, yay! http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-289113-.html As you can see if you read the thread, people still debate its safety, but my only point was that the manufacturer would not affirm that the product IS actually safe.

Edited YET AGAIN to add a link to this thread with more info http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-601707-.html

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%