Ganache Instead Of Bc Under Fondant

Decorating By cindycakes Updated 22 Aug 2009 , 4:34am by sugarandslice

cindycakes Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 1:54pm
post #1 of 13

I have heard that you can use ganache instead of bc under a fondant covered cake and it creates a smoother look. I want to try this for a cake I am making this weekend but I am wondering if the cake needs to be refridgerated after completing it? Will the ganache go bad because of the cream in it? May be a dumb question but I don't want to take any chances since I need to transport it 5 hours away. Plus it's for my in-laws so I don't want to make anyone sick. Thank you for your responses.

12 replies
MikeRowesHunny Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 1:56pm
post #2 of 13

No, especially if you use the setting ganache recipe. I've used it on wedding cakes that have been at room temp for a few days with no problems at all. HTH!

cindycakes Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 2:10pm
post #3 of 13

Thank you. Can you tell me where I can get the setting ganache recipe?

grandmom Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 4:02pm
post #4 of 13

I recently did ganache under fondant for the first time, and I had really great success with it. But first I read through the following thread twice, making note of important points as I went. The thread contains the ratios of chocolate/cream for different circumstances. It is a huge thread but oh so helpful:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6464462-.html#6464462

MikeRowesHunny Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 5:53pm
post #5 of 13

In case you don't want to wade through all that, and seeing as it was my thread, I can give you the quantities!

White or milk chocolate setting ganache:

1 cup heavy cream (35% fat content)
27oz good quality white or chocolate

Dark chocolate ganache:

1 cup heavy cream (35% fat content)
18oz good quality dark chocolate

Melt together and stir until well combined. Lay a piece of saran wrap on the surface and leave to firm up overnight before use (should be the texture of peanut butter). Once on the cake leave to set completely at a cool room temperature overnight again.

You can use any quantities you like so long as you keep the ratios (by weight) 1 part cream : 3 parts white/milk chocolate, or 1 part cream : 2 parts dark chocolate

aundrea Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 6:06pm
post #6 of 13

so you dont pour on the cake once the gnache is made? this is interesting. i am looking forward to trying this new technique with foundant. i have been looking for something a bit sturdier under the fondant than buttercream frosting.
do you let the gnache set overnight after applying to the cake before you put the fondant on?
thanks for asking my questions, and for letting me jump on this post!

MikeRowesHunny Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 6:24pm
post #7 of 13

Yes, you spread it on the cake like buttercream and smooth with a hot spatula, at this point it will be soft like peanut butter (if it has set too hard after the initial mixing, just give it a few seconds in the microwave to soften it a bit). The once you've done your smoothing, let the cake set up overnight. To get the fondant to stick to the hardened ganache, use a water spritzer over your cake, or apply a sugar syrup (cold!) glaze/ apricot jam glaze. HTH!

onlymadaresane Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 6:53pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeRowesHunny

In case you don't want to wade through all that, and seeing as it was my thread, I can give you the quantities!

White or milk chocolate setting ganache:

1 cup heavy cream (35% fat content)
27oz good quality white or chocolate

Dark chocolate ganache:

1 cup heavy cream (35% fat content)
18oz good quality dark chocolate

Melt together and stir until well combined. Lay a piece of saran wrap on the surface and leave to firm up overnight before use (should be the texture of peanut butter). Once on the cake leave to set completely at a cool room temperature overnight again.

You can use any quantities you like so long as you keep the ratios (by weight) 1 part cream : 3 parts white/milk chocolate, or 1 part cream : 2 parts dark chocolate





Thank you so much for the recipe I'm going to give it a shot tonight! My question being though- how much does one recipe cover? Thanks!

grandmom Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 7:05pm
post #9 of 13

I barely covered a 12-inch and 8-inch tier, both about 5.5 inches tall, with the following:

48 oz. white chocolate
16 oz. cream

I did not use it as filling. I would have done better with 60 oz. white chocolate + 20 oz. cream.

Maria_Campos Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 7:28pm
post #10 of 13

Also a great book to buy that goes more into detail about this method is "Planet Cake", I started useing this method about a year ago before the book came out from reading the threads on their forums, and I have the book now and I must say it is my new cake bible, it is excellent!

leahk Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 7:46pm
post #11 of 13

Can I torte and layer a cake with whipped ganache filling and cover it in ganache and then freeze it that way? I would defrost it wrapped so the moisture would be outside the saran wrap. Would this work?

sugarMomma Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 2:32am
post #12 of 13

I was looking for info on white chocolate ganache and this helps, thanks all!

sugarandslice Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 4:34am
post #13 of 13

I'd also like to say how great the Planet Cake book is regarding using ganache under fondant. Their method and step-by-step instructions are fantastic. I wouldn't do it any other way!
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