How Do I Make My Buttercream White?

Decorating By kamikaze_fish Updated 17 Aug 2009 , 8:29pm by varika

kamikaze_fish Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 5:08pm
post #1 of 10

I've been using a recipe I found on here that is powdered sugar, milk, butter, and flavoring. The butter and flavoring keep making it turn yellow. I went from margarine to real butter which made the flavor amazing, and I went to no color vanilla, and both helped but it still had a yellow tint to it. I even used the butter with no added coloring, but it was still a little yellow. Is there a white butter? Is there something I can add to it to take the color out? Is bleach toxic? Ok, just kidding, I know bleach is toxic. javascript:emoticon('icon_lol.gif')

9 replies
tiggy2 Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 5:13pm
post #2 of 10

You can add a teeny tiny bit of violet color to remove the yellow. Your best bet is to leave out the butter and use a clear butter flavor in addition to your other clear flavorings.

Kiddiekakes Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 5:14pm
post #3 of 10

Wilton puts out a product called Brite White and you squirt it in the icing like coloring and it turn the color from Ecru to white.You may want to make a shortening based icing as well which will help keep it white.

kamikaze_fish Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 6:49pm
post #4 of 10

Thank you both for the replies.

If I remove the butter but add butter flavoring, would I substitute the butter with milk or shortening then?

varika Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 7:08pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kamikaze_fish

Thank you both for the replies.

If I remove the butter but add butter flavoring, would I substitute the butter with milk or shortening then?




Shortening. Butter is the fat from milk, and there's more water than there is fat in any given glass of milk, so you'll never reach the right ratio of fat to liquid to sugar if you try to use just milk.

You can also use half shortening and half butter to get closer to the butter taste with a much whiter color. If I need white, I usually do half-and-half shortening/butter with a touch of Brite White to balance out the remaining yellow color.

kamikaze_fish Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Quote:

Butter is the fat from milk, and there's more water than there is fat in any given glass of milk...





Is this why my bc turns out terrible if I use skim milk?

Gingoodies Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 7:58pm
post #7 of 10

Buttercream needs FAT! icon_surprised.gificon_lol.gif I use whole milk, half and half, even heavy cream. I never use water, ever! Also if you mix your bc for a good length of time it also will tend to make it look whiter. Don't know why but it works. Also I found out this weekend that really filling up that bowl, so the paddle is covered with the frosting will result in a creamier product.

BlakesCakes Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 8:03pm
post #8 of 10

No need to get rid of the butter or the real vanilla!
Just add a dot or 2 of violet gel/paste color and you'll get a nice white buttercream without any change in consistency or taste.

I use real butter, bourbon or madagascar vanilla, and heavy cream in my buttercream. If it has to be white, I add the tiniest bit of violet while the buttercream is mixing and I'm good to go.

Rae

Clovers Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 8:23pm
post #9 of 10

Really, violet? How does that work? Is it a colour wheel trick or something?

varika Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 8:29pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kamikaze_fish

Quote:
Quote:

Butter is the fat from milk, and there's more water than there is fat in any given glass of milk...




Is this why my bc turns out terrible if I use skim milk?




Quite likely, yes. Get yourself some good heavy cream and give that a try. You'll be shocked at how much better your icing tastes.

My recipe is:

1 c. salted butter, roughly room temp.
2-4 tbsp. heavy cream
1-2 tsp. vanilla--I use clear most of the time because it is cheap but tasty
1 lb. powdered sugar

Cream the butter and liquids together until they're completely combined and significantly lightened in color. This usually takes 4-5 minutes, and often I have to stop and scrape the bowl down. (Oh, for a self-scraping blade...) For a double batch, it can take up to twice as long.

Add the powdered sugar, cover themixer with a towel, and mix on 1 for about 4 minutes. Stop and scrape down your blade and everything, then mix for another 3, still on 1.

This gets a frosting that is almost completely white even without the brite white, and has a scrumptious taste that is sweet without being OMG I JUST ATE A BAG OF SUGAR BY ITSELF sweet. I've never had a problem with it taking colors at this stage, either, even blues. I'm sure if you put it on a pure white piece of paper, it would show a slight variation, but I can't tell by eyeball.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%