Cakes Are Not Done In The Middle And Are Doming Up On Top

Decorating By mcmack Updated 18 Aug 2009 , 12:13pm by LittleLinda

mcmack Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 11:35pm
post #1 of 15

No matter what I do my cakes keep getting a dome on the top. I use the bake even strips, have been following the Wilton guidelines for baking in a 3" deep pan. I have checked my oven temperature and it is bang on. I also seem to have to bake my cakes a lot longer that the Wilton guide before they are cooked in the middle. I am using the middle rack. I would appreciate any suggestions

14 replies
sugarMomma Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 11:47pm
post #2 of 15

Put some flower nails in the middle to help the middle cook. Works for me.

sugarMomma Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 11:56pm
post #3 of 15

You also may want to reduce the cooking temp 25 degrees so the edges and top don't cook as fast. For anything over 10" I always cook at 325.
What kind of pans do you use? Thicker, heavier pans like Magic Line help batter to cook more evenly. I use those, Bake-Even strips that are nice and soaked, and for 3 inch pans or large 2 inch pans I will put a few flower nails in the middle. It may be overkill, but I never get a dome.

PuffCake Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 12:13am
post #4 of 15

I also use flower nails (greased and floured) in all my cake pans in addition to the bake even strips. It makes a huge difference. I rarely have very much to cut off the top when leveling.

Makeitmemorable Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 11:27am
post #5 of 15

[quote="sugarMomma"]You also may want to reduce the cooking temp 25 degrees so the edges and top don't cook as fast. For anything over 10" I always cook at 325.
quote]

Totally agree, I turn the temperature down and whilst they do take longer to cook, they are all but flat when they come out - the hotter the over, the bigger the buldge! icon_razz.gif

Good luck

Texas_Rose Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 11:32am
post #6 of 15

I always bake at 325 and use a flower nail, regardless of the cake size. They come out much flatter. I use the Wilton 3" pans without bake-even strips.

PinkZiab Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 3:02pm
post #7 of 15

I agree with turning the temperature down, although I've never used baking strips or flower nails/heating cores. I also don't go by anyone else's baking guide as for the time...It's just that, a guide. It's a good indicator of when to start checking the cake, but in the end, you bake it until it's done, regardless of how long the pan instructions or recipe say.

Banana0501 Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 3:34pm
post #8 of 15

Many bakers are suggesting using flower nails in the middle of the cake - can someone please explain the process - are they greased, floured and put into the wet batter at the beginning of the baking process? Thanks.

PuffCake Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 3:36pm
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banana0501

Many bakers are suggesting using flower nails in the middle of the cake - can someone please explain the process - are they greased, floured and put into the wet batter at the beginning of the baking process? Thanks.


Yes, grease and flour the flower nail and put it into the middle of the prepared pan before adding the batter. The metal conducts heat and brings heat to the middle of the cake to help with even baking.

Banana0501 Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 3:41pm
post #10 of 15

Ohhhhh! I had everything upside down, trying to figure out how the nail would stand up in wet batter LOL! Thanks PuffCake!

PuffCake Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 3:50pm
post #11 of 15

Glad to help Banana0501! That's too funny! LOL! The flower nail works just like the Wilton heating core but it's less cumbersome and doesn't take a big chunk out of your cake. Just pull it out when you turn the cake out of the pan. I do this for all my cakes, not just the large ones. It makes a big difference. I also use bake even strips and bake at 325. I get the best results when I do all three.

sweetcakes Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 8:48pm
post #12 of 15

mcmack, is it all the 3" pans or would it just be the 8"??? do what everyone else has said, temp, flowernail, bakeeven strips etc. now no one has mentioned this but i think you are putting just a little too much batter in the pan. it could only be enough to make one or two cupcakes, but i was having the same problem until i cut back on the amount of batter that i put in the pan. try that too next time.

LittleLinda Posted 17 Aug 2009 , 10:38pm
post #13 of 15

Banana0501, the cake will rise above the tip of the nail. When you turn the cake out of the pan, the flat side of the nail will be visible and come out easily.

mcmack Posted 18 Aug 2009 , 11:54am
post #14 of 15

Thanks so much for all the replies.

Yes it is the same with all of my 3" pans (of course these are what I have the most of). and I use the strips and have used heating core but the doming was huge.....I may be using too much batter, (allthough I do try to get it half full) but I want to make sure I get a full 3 inches. I have to bake a 10 x 3 this morning and I will use the strips, 3 flower nails and bake at 325, should I just fill half way or should I put a certain number cups in?? I was using the guide from the wilton site which said to use 8 cups, should I go with this??

LittleLinda Posted 18 Aug 2009 , 12:13pm
post #15 of 15

I know I fill my two inch pans up to one inch below the rim. I don't know if the same rule applies for three inch; but definitely don't go above an inch below the rim.

Oh, and when you cut off the crowns, do this:
http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6514961-.html#6514961

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