Frosting Cracked And Fell Of Cake!!!

Decorating By pjem Updated 16 Aug 2009 , 10:56pm by xstitcher

pjem Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:16pm
post #1 of 10

I ha ve two questions. I did my first paide wedding cake and probably my last (too stressful and will post pics later). One of the cakes, a 10 inch round torted with crusting creamcheese frosting ended up will a bubble in the side of the icing. I now know that I probably did not let the cake settle before I frosted it. Will this also make the frosting crack and slide off the cake? I had a problem with the frosting on the 6 inch round sliding off the sides of the cake. Can someone please help so that does not happen again? I think I am done using creamcheese frosting though.

Thanks

9 replies
foxymomma521 Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:24pm
post #2 of 10

The only time I've had that problem is when I used Crisco brand shortening in my icing.

dnrlee Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:37pm
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

The only time I've had that problem is when I used Crisco brand shortening in my icing.




what brand do you use?

foxymomma521 Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:43pm
post #4 of 10

I use Alpine hi-ratio... Hi ratio has made the BIGGEST difference in my icing. I've been using it for about a yr and a half now and love it.

dnrlee Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:46pm
post #5 of 10

I can't find high-ratio shortening anywhere around where I live. I guess I'll just have to order it!

foxymomma521 Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 1:51pm
post #6 of 10

Have you tried googling "bakery supply shop" for your area?

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 9:49pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

The only time I've had that problem is when I used Crisco brand shortening in my icing.




This must be an American Crisco problem. I use Crisco all the time and have never had a problem with it. Maybe Canadian is still high-ratio. Don't know. icon_confused.gif

mandyloo Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 10:01pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

The only time I've had that problem is when I used Crisco brand shortening in my icing.



This must be an American Crisco problem. I use Crisco all the time and have never had a problem with it. Maybe Canadian is still high-ratio. Don't know. icon_confused.gif




I could be wrong, but crisco hasn't ever been hi-ratio, has it? I mean, it used to have trans fats, but that's not the same, is it?
*cringing if I'm wrong*

ayerim979 Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 10:40pm
post #9 of 10

Well they I have always used crisco and to be honest I have necer had a problem, like you mention the settleing of the cake does have alot to do with the frosting slidding off .

Im lying it did happen once now that I recall I use pudding for filling for some reason that happend of course the HOT weather was of no help. I no longer use pudding for fillings though. (nothing against it I guess I just dont know how to work with it) but it seemed like it was just oozing out and slidding it was the worst experience.

xstitcher Posted 16 Aug 2009 , 10:56pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandyloo

Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

The only time I've had that problem is when I used Crisco brand shortening in my icing.



This must be an American Crisco problem. I use Crisco all the time and have never had a problem with it. Maybe Canadian is still high-ratio. Don't know. icon_confused.gif



I could be wrong, but crisco hasn't ever been hi-ratio, has it? I mean, it used to have trans fats, but that's not the same, is it?
*cringing if I'm wrong*




You are correct it is not the same thing and yes crisco did used to have trans fats in it.

High ratio shortening has added emulsifiers in it. Here's a short blurb on it from Little Lady Cakes:

What is it?


It is one hundred percent fat with added emulsifiers, white in color and does not contain any added salt or water. The difference between high ratio shortening and regular shortening is that it contains microemulsifiers that allows your mixture to hold more sugar and liquid. It also gives a finer and smoother texture to cakes and help keep them moist, as well as keeps icings more stable with a less greasy mouth feel.

What is it used for?

Baking recipes that contain a large percentage of sugar like buttercream icing.

http://www.littleladycakes.com/2009/04/high-ratio-shortening.html

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