If it's illegal to sell cakes from home, can I do this?

Business By MrsNancyB1 Updated 22 Aug 2009 , 11:16pm by Larkin121

mbelgard Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 7:55pm
post #91 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

I'm amazed that a HD person would "give permission" to someone to sell cakes to "just family/friends" in a state that doesn't allow home kitchens to be licensed.

Is this "permission" he gave "in writing as law"? icon_confused.gif
Here's an interesting scenerio...an unlicensed baker sells a wedding cake to a family member (with permission from the HD inspector)....people at the wedding who don't know the baker get ill or have an allergic reaction to something in the cake, inevitably they sue the baker. Will that HD inspector stand behind his "word" that he gave the baker permission to sell to "family/friends"?

That's a chance I'd be afraid to take.

There are just too many gray areas when it comes to this.

To the OP, I know it's frustrating....I lived in a state for 20 yrs that didn't allow home kitchens to be licensed...we moved to MA 5 yrs ago because I wanted to pursue this business. Personally, I always felt that the repercussions that could come from selling cakes illegally were just not worth the risk of losing my home.

I think that's the important thing to think about. Does the reward outweigh the risk?...for me it didn't.




A couple years ago my mother told me the same thing and I read through the laws in Minnesota because I didn't believe it and there was no written exception at the time that I could find.

I didn't believe it because it's a state where any goodies brought to school have to come in a sealed container from a store, no exceptions. If you break the seal on the box of cupcakes to take out a few for home they can not serve it at the school. I figured a state that is that rigid about some cupcakes for a birthday at school wouldn't have any exceptions for any food products.



Just because the people who are supposed to enforce the law don't doesn't mean that it's legal. A good example is kids drinking up here on the res. When I met my husband the big thing was for underage kids to drive around in the town on the reservation and drink, they didn't even bother to put whatever they were drinking in new containers. If the cops did pull them over they would hardly ever arrest, ticket or fine them. The standard was to take the booze away and tell them that they didn't want to see them in town again that night.

Generally the kids would just drive around on the back road after they got new stuff to drink. I have no reason to believe that it's different now than it was 10 years ago.

Their lack of enforcement certainly didn't mean that it was actually LEGAL to drive around drinking underage in town. It also didn't mean that if the cops had wanted the kids couldn't have been in a huge amount of trouble either.

Deb_ Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 8:25pm
post #92 of 133

Wow mbelgard, that's an unbelievable story....just crazy.

itsacake Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 9:00pm
post #93 of 133

I don't actually disagree, dkelly. That is why I gave away all my cakes--for four years. However, I think you could be missing the point in that if I GAVE a wedding cake to a relative and someone at the party got sick, they could still sue me. Just the same as if they tripped on my front porch. Anyone can sue anyone for anything. None of that has anything to do with payment or with the health department. That is a liability question and it comes into play every time I have someone over to my house for dinner or take a cake or a casserole to a friend's house.

I think what everyone is saying is that the health departments are interpreting the law to mean that you can't have a food business from an unlicensed kitchen. The interpretation is with respect to when it becomes a business.

If a group of us are all giving a wedding shower and splitting expenses and I do the cake, that is clearly not "selling' (But if someone gets sick, we might still be sued). If two of my friends are giving a shower and ask me as a favor to make the cake and offer to pay my expenses is that selling? This is not so clear.

Though I didn't take money til I found a licensed kitchen to share, that was my choice and clearly follows a minority opinion. My health department would have allowed it, and yes I think they would have come to court and stood behind their decision, as long as I could prove I didn't have a business and did cakes only for close friends as a favor--not for profit.

But if you really can't sell ANY food from an unlicensed kitchen, what about the cub scout dime-a-dip dinner where everyone brings something? Or all the times I organized/cooked dinner for the marching band and they paid me back? And yeah, they could have sued. The question is could they have won?

cakegrandma Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 9:35pm
post #94 of 133

If you look up the meaning of business it states "goods or services exchanged for money on the basis of perceived worth." So anytime you take money for a cake you are in "business". A HD person may tell you that they won't bother you and probably 99 times out of a 100 they would not as they are too busy inspecting the restaurants and other places that they do. Let someone call and tell them that you are selling cakes out of your house, like the lady 2 blocks behind you that does the same thing and has lost some customers to you, and guess who is going to be at your door. MS. HD that said she would look the other way. I saw it happen in Atlanta, I don't know if the person turned in was done so by another caker or not but she was turned in and told if she persisted she would be fined. Myself, I think a kitchen to rent or use is better. I think that by doing so, you can go a little bigger and the occasional cake can turn into a rewarding hobby and eventually a great business if you want it to.
evelyn

3GCakes Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 9:41pm
post #95 of 133

This sort of gray area exists with many laws.

In my area, when they changed the speed limit to 65, the sherriff was on the news saying that they will give people a few mile per hour radius, especially if they are passing someone. I don't think many people get pulled over for going 66 or even 67.

I don't think people should have a business where their law states they should not have a business, but it appears that most HD do not think being reimbursed for ingredients or selling a cake to a family or friend is a violation of the SPIRIT of the laws they intend to uphold.

kelleym Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:20pm
post #96 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakegrandma

If you look up the meaning of business it states "goods or services exchanged for money on the basis of perceived worth." So anytime you take money for a cake you are in "business".




I disagree. We already saw from the posting of the Texas definitions upthread that learning the definition for one term only leads to more questions. I'll stick to the way my local official interprets the law and is helping me to follow it (yes, FOLLOW the law, not evade it).

costumeczar Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 10:23pm
post #97 of 133

The inspector from our HD made the point that even if you're not a licensed business, the IRS will probably still be interested in any income that you get from cakes. Or the value of bartered items. Or "reimbursement" for ingredients. If you do ever get fined for some reason, they'll probably start looking into your back sales tax and your income taxes, too.

And to head off the inevitable, yes, the IRS website says that babysitting and other forms of petty cash earning jobs are supposed to be counted as income tax. And no, not many people pay employment taxes for their babysitters, but when they do get caught not paying they also get fined (think of all the politicians who have illegal immigrant nannies and got busted.)

3GCakes Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 11:01pm
post #98 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

The inspector from our HD made the point that even if you're not a licensed business, the IRS will probably still be interested in any income that you get from cakes. Or the value of bartered items. Or "reimbursement" for ingredients. If you do ever get fined for some reason, they'll probably start looking into your back sales tax and your income taxes, too.

And to head off the inevitable, yes, the IRS website says that babysitting and other forms of petty cash earning jobs are supposed to be counted as income tax. And no, not many people pay employment taxes for their babysitters, but when they do get caught not paying they also get fined (think of all the politicians who have illegal immigrant nannies and got busted.)




You're right, everyone should pay all taxes due. Taxes can be evaded on licensed and unlicensed businesses....wether they deal in cake or not. The IRS didn't care that Heidi Fleiss was a madam, but that she didn't pay her taxes on that business. Even drug dealers have to pay taxes. And I doubt the IRS will contact your local HD to see if you passed your last HD inspection, and if you (general you) got your license suspended until you cleaned up your act and if you made any cakes in the interim and what cakes did you make until your license was reinstated so they can contact the HD etc. ad nauseum....

-K8memphis Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 11:38pm
post #99 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakemom777

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

The inspector from our HD made the point that even if you're not a licensed business, the IRS will probably still be interested in any income that you get from cakes. Or the value of bartered items. Or "reimbursement" for ingredients. If you do ever get fined for some reason, they'll probably start looking into your back sales tax and your income taxes, too.

And to head off the inevitable, yes, the IRS website says that babysitting and other forms of petty cash earning jobs are supposed to be counted as income tax. And no, not many people pay employment taxes for their babysitters, but when they do get caught not paying they also get fined (think of all the politicians who have illegal immigrant nannies and got busted.)



You're right, everyone should pay all taxes due. Taxes can be evaded on licensed and unlicensed businesses....wether they deal in cake or not. The IRS didn't care that Heidi Fleiss was a madam, but that she didn't pay her taxes on that business. Even drug dealers have to pay taxes. And I doubt the IRS will contact your local HD to see if you passed your last HD inspection, and if you (general you) got your license suspended until you cleaned up your act and if you made any cakes in the interim and what cakes did you make until your license was reinstated so they can contact the HD etc. ad nauseum....




Hmm, this gets complicated. You pay taxes on all the stuff you bought to make the cake--you are more getting reimbursed than making a taxable income showing profit.

I mean that's where the part about it not being a business comes in. You have to have a FEIN to pay sales tax in 10C if you don't have a FEIN you can't pay them.

I mean we should all go get FEIN's for our non-businesses so we can double pay taxes on our cakes that the the health department could care less about because we are not businesses in the first place.

Deliver me!

I say let's celebrate our freedom while we still have some yes?
Not to mention sanity.

__Jamie__ Posted 20 Aug 2009 , 11:44pm
post #100 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I say let's celebrate our freedom while we still have some yes?




Mmmmm hmmmm. Do ya think everyone will be given monthly vouchers for cake? I mean, vodka and bread, yes, that's a given! icon_twisted.gif

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:01am
post #101 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I say let's celebrate our freedom while we still have some yes?



Mmmmm hmmmm. Do ya think everyone will be given monthly vouchers for cake? I mean, vodka and bread, yes, that's a given! icon_twisted.gif





icon_lol.gif

Deb_ Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:01am
post #102 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I say let's celebrate our freedom while we still have some yes?



Mmmmm hmmmm. Do ya think everyone will be given monthly vouchers for cake? I mean, vodka and bread, yes, that's a given! icon_twisted.gif




Probably not with this administration icon_rolleyes.gif


Itsacake.......yes I agree even when we "give" away our food/cakes we could get sued if someone fell ill or worse. That's why I think it's smart to become a legal licensed & insured business, no matter how big or small.....cake business that is.

MelissaRae Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:10am
post #103 of 133

So has anyone gotten fined or any kind of other trouble for sellin a cake out of their house? Has anyone claimed to have gotten sick from a cake? I just dont understand how they would be able to pin point the cake as the food that got them sick from if it was a wedding or party that had other food they ate. I think the only people who you would have trouble with would be someone who is jealous or someone who was unhappy with their cake. And of coarse the whole tax issue....

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:15am
post #104 of 133

Y'know what I think and this is just me--there's much worse things than getting sued like going to the dentist for example. I mean draw the line wherever you want for yourself but all they're gonna get is my house. And I like my house but dude, take it.

We'll have to move and live somewhere else.

I do not fear getting sued and I do not live my life based around getting sued or not getting sued.

The only person ever got sick eating my cake was a diabetic who knew better than to eat it but she loved my butter pecan with toffee filling & had a rum splash in the cake.

Several years ago right after my Mom passed away, I made a cake for a new work place I was at. I think my Mom spiked it or something --it was magically delicious. It was absolutely amazing. I mean I've made the cake forever--this one was different. And my little diabetic friend had some of that cake and every time I made it after that she ate too much which probably one piece was too much but she din sue me. She got me orders.

Thanks Mom, love you

3GCakes Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:22am
post #105 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

Y'know what I think and this is just me--there's much worse things than getting sued like going to the dentist for example. I mean draw the line wherever you want for yourself but all they're gonna get is my house. And I like my house but dude, take it.

We'll have to move and live somewhere else.

I do not fear getting sued and I do not live my life based around getting sued or not getting sued.

The only person ever got sick eating my cake was a diabetic who knew better than to eat it but she loved my butter pecan with toffee filling & had a rum splash in the cake.

Several years ago right after my Mom passed away, I made a cake for a new work place I was at. I think my Mom spiked it or something --it was magically delicious. It was absolutely amazing. I mean I've made the cake forever--this one was different. And my little diabetic friend had some of that cake and every time I made it after that she ate too much which probably one piece was too much but she din sue me. She got me orders.

Thanks Mom, love you




That makes me guffaw!

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:35am
post #106 of 133

What's a guffaw?
I looked it up but I don't know how you mean it.

3GCakes Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:41am
post #107 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

What's a guffaw?
I looked it up but I don't know how you mean it.




Main Entry: guf·faw
Pronunciation: \\(ˌicon_wink.gifFunction: noun
Etymology: imitative
Date: 1720
: a loud or boisterous burst of laughter

guf·faw \\(ˌicon_wink.gif
It makes me think of Lucky Charms, of course...and then when someone describes their cake like that (and I don't for one moment doubt that it was magically delicious....) it just sounded so funny.

Its kind of like LOL but I found it funnier.

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:45am
post #108 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakemom777

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

What's a guffaw?
I looked it up but I don't know how you mean it.



Main Entry: guf·faw
Pronunciation: \\(ˌicon_wink.gifFunction: noun
Etymology: imitative
Date: 1720
: a loud or boisterous burst of laughter

guf·faw \\(ˌicon_wink.gif
It makes me think of Lucky Charms, of course...and then when someone describes their cake like that (and I don't for one moment doubt that it was magically delicious....) it just sounded so funny.

Its kind of like LOL but I found it funnier.




Oh wow thanks that was sweet!

Thank you!

mbelgard Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 1:07pm
post #109 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Wow mbelgard, that's an unbelievable story....just crazy.




It's true though, living on the reservation is a whole different world, and I figured it was a good example of something we all know to be completely illegal even if it isn't always enforced the way it should be. If one of those cops had opted to enforce it the kids he pulled over would have been in a large amount of trouble, they were taking a chance every time they did it.

The same goes for somewhere where the HD doesn't enforce or looks the other way when you aren't allowed to sell cakes out of your home. There is always the chance that one of the inspectors WILL opt to enforce the law.

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 1:22pm
post #110 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard

...The same goes for somewhere where the HD doesn't enforce or looks the other way when you aren't allowed to sell cakes out of your home. There is always the chance that one of the inspectors WILL opt to enforce the law.




I am only referencing the cake issue not the booze.

I think this quote demonstrates wrong and inflammatory wording.

Perhaps one could say, "There is always the chance that one of the inspectors will opt to interpret the law differently."

That is a viable way to word that.

The way it is worded in the quote implies that the poster has made the foregone conclusion that the law is indeed being broken and therefore the authorities are being negligent.

If the authorities are being negligent then that's a completely different issue than me receiving reimbursement from my sister for making my neice's wedding cake.

Then about the booze--do we not see the slightest bit of difference in underage drinking and making cake?

We are not a society of legalistic maniacs.
Are there some dumb lawsuits? sure.
Are our legal lines drawn up by squeeling machete smiting madmen who wear blinders to interpretation? nope

I'm just glad the world isn't run by some of us cakers. icon_biggrin.gif

ceshell Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 5:35pm
post #111 of 133

I totally agree. Just because certain authorities charged with enforcing/interpreting the laws have been known to "look the other way" for certain infractions, does not make it a foregone conclusion that every single HD rep who says "selling a cake to your family member does not mean that you are operating a bakery" is wrong and shirking his or her job responsibilities.

ANY time someone sells something to someone else (especially when it comes to "reimbursing") does NOT automatically mean that the persons involved are "operating a business." This assumption totally defies any sensible interpretation of law.

To the babysitting example, I would argue that if you pay your own child for babysitting his kid sister, then I'll be willing to bet that no, you are not expected to pay taxes on that. But it's true, I haven't read the law to be sure.

To go back to Kelleym's point: it is really fruitless for us to debate this here; it seems like the most sensible plan is to believe your own enforcing authority when asked what is actually legal, rather than be shocked and apalled when they state that the enforcement of the law varies from your own personal strict interpretation of its words. SUre, protect yourself: get names and write down dates of conversations. But when their policy jibes with common sense, then there's a point where you've gotta believe them.

MelissaRae Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 8:26am
post #112 of 133

well thank you for all of your input.... I think that they should focus on more important things that people r selling like drugs and weapons not cake and cookies.... I mostly sell my cakes for a low price to family and friends until I start up with a local caterer then my prices will increase icon_wink.gif

-K8memphis Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 10:24am
post #113 of 133

Melissa Rae,

Ok wait--people have certainly gotten into big trouble for caking from an unapproved home facility and it's happened/happening all across the country.

(This is why trying to relate underage drinking, selling to minors as well as drinking and driving to making wedding cakes was an absurd analogy)

This thread is not at all about sanitation or about flying under the radar. This thread is about being a non-business, being a consumer where there isn't any radar, no one is in flight. We are grounded.

This thread is about doing cakes for family not about doing cakes for caterers. It's not ok you run a big risk of getting into trouble.

Doing cakes for caterers is a whole different thread.[/i]

ziggytarheel Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:13am
post #114 of 133

I would love for a very in-the-know insurance agent (or an underwriter or very experienced claims adjuster) to chime in. I would think that if it was indisputable that you were not in business and were truly a hobbyist who took no compensation, that in case of a lawsuit, your homeowner's insurance would kick in. However, if there is even a hint that you do this as a business, using whatever definition that would fit legally, your homeowner's insurance would specifically exclude coverage. Certainly if you serve food in your home to your guests for no charge, there would be coverage.

-K8memphis Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:40am
post #115 of 133

What is this over riding fear of lawsuit?

What exactly is that about?

Who is doing all this suing?

Who ever got sued?

We have a lawsuit thread. There were some big problems in there but extenuating circumstances like poison, bad equipment failure. So these folks would be being prosecuted for crimes of murder and harming the public out of willfulness or negligence--no insurance for that.

What kind of cakes are we making that we need this costly invisible armour shield to protect us from the big bad boogey man of "getting sued"? The sky is falling the sky is falling.

I stand behind my cakes (for family).
I don't need to be insured since I don't run a business.

I don't need to be insured to protect me from idiots.
Being an idiot is beyond the ability to be insured against.

Your insurance agaent will sell you a rider to insure a home business whether it's legal or not.

costumeczar Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 11:58am
post #116 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggytarheel

I would love for a very in-the-know insurance agent (or an underwriter or very experienced claims adjuster) to chime in. I would think that if it was indisputable that you were not in business and were truly a hobbyist who took no compensation, that in case of a lawsuit, your homeowner's insurance would kick in. However, if there is even a hint that you do this as a business, using whatever definition that would fit legally, your homeowner's insurance would specifically exclude coverage. Certainly if you serve food in your home to your guests for no charge, there would be coverage.




Yes! Regardless of the "don't worry about the insurance" theme in other posts, I'd also be interested in hearing from someone who works in the insurance field and knows what they're talking about. It was my understanding that if you use your car for deliveries you have to insure it as a business vehicle (or so my insurance agent told me) so why not your home as well? And it wouldn't be just cake-related injuries that would be the issue, would it? If someone was at your home to pick something up and fell off your porch, would that be covered under homeowners if the insurer found out that they were there for "business" purposes, or would that be an issue? Just asking...Oh, wait, I already did my research for MY situation and asked my insurance agent. (although I'd still like to see if anyone else has experience with the same thing to see if I should have MORE coverage!)

The problem with this kind of thread is that people will pick and choose the advice that OTHER people have received from their local authorities, even if it's not relevant to their situation. Just the same way that people will get three different answers from three different HD employees when you ask them the same question, but this is on a larger scale. If I may speak for the other business owners on here who have posted about doing things by the book, I think that what we're warning against is the tendency to believe what you want to believe.

If you're trying to set up a business, find out everything that you can from your local Health Department, not from CC. It's helpful to post on here to see where to start, but if you want to do this legally you'll have to go with your own state's laws. Don't assume that you can go to the internet for answers and keep looking until you find someone who will tell you that you can do what you wanted to do in the first place.

ziggytarheel Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 1:44pm
post #117 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

What is this over riding fear of lawsuit?

What exactly is that about?

Who is doing all this suing?

Who ever got sued?

We have a lawsuit thread. There were some big problems in there but extenuating circumstances like poison, bad equipment failure. So these folks would be being prosecuted for crimes of murder and harming the public out of willfulness or negligence--no insurance for that.

What kind of cakes are we making that we need this costly invisible armour shield to protect us from the big bad boogey man of "getting sued"? The sky is falling the sky is falling.

I stand behind my cakes (for family).
I don't need to be insured since I don't run a business.

I don't need to be insured to protect me from idiots.
Being an idiot is beyond the ability to be insured against.

Your insurance agaent will sell you a rider to insure a home business whether it's legal or not.




I simply trying to address insurance coverage for when you are held liable for anything. Information is important and assumptions get people in trouble.

I don't worry about getting sued. But, I do work in the insurance industry and our particular customers are ALWAYS getting sued. Yes, often times we are talking about car accidents but employers get sued quite a bit, people get sued when they are negligent in almost any type of damage, whether it be unintentionally starting a fire, leaving a toy on your doorstep and someone slips and falls, turning your back on your shopping cart while unloading this (personal experience...not sued because I paid up), etc. I would be concerned about this issue because I work in the industry and see these issues regularly. I seriously doubt if I ever get sued for anything. I seriously doubt that most of you would get sued for anything. But a perishable filling that goes bad or unknowingly passing along ecoli or salmonella or lysteria would surely get you in a whole lot of trouble.

And, laws DO vary. There are riders available for some businesses in some states for some types of policies. But I don't think there would be coverage if the business wasn't deemed "legal". Insurance is a contract and if the contract specified that you had to have a legal business and you didn't, you would have no coverage.

Just wanting to share some information. Not joining in on the debate or trying to scare anyone. icon_smile.gif

ziggytarheel Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 1:53pm
post #118 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggytarheel

I would love for a very in-the-know insurance agent (or an underwriter or very experienced claims adjuster) to chime in. I would think that if it was indisputable that you were not in business and were truly a hobbyist who took no compensation, that in case of a lawsuit, your homeowner's insurance would kick in. However, if there is even a hint that you do this as a business, using whatever definition that would fit legally, your homeowner's insurance would specifically exclude coverage. Certainly if you serve food in your home to your guests for no charge, there would be coverage.



Yes! Regardless of the "don't worry about the insurance" theme in other posts, I'd also be interested in hearing from someone who works in the insurance field and knows what they're talking about. It was my understanding that if you use your car for deliveries you have to insure it as a business vehicle (or so my insurance agent told me) so why not your home as well? And it wouldn't be just cake-related injuries that would be the issue, would it? If someone was at your home to pick something up and fell off your porch, would that be covered under homeowners if the insurer found out that they were there for "business" purposes, or would that be an issue? Just asking...Oh, wait, I already did my research for MY situation and asked my insurance agent. (although I'd still like to see if anyone else has experience with the same thing to see if I should have MORE coverage!)

The problem with this kind of thread is that people will pick and choose the advice that OTHER people have received from their local authorities, even if it's not relevant to their situation. Just the same way that people will get three different answers from three different HD employees when you ask them the same question, but this is on a larger scale. If I may speak for the other business owners on here who have posted about doing things by the book, I think that what we're warning against is the tendency to believe what you want to believe.

If you're trying to set up a business, find out everything that you can from your local Health Department, not from CC. It's helpful to post on here to see where to start, but if you want to do this legally you'll have to go with your own state's laws. Don't assume that you can go to the internet for answers and keep looking until you find someone who will tell you that you can do what you wanted to do in the first place.




You make such good points! Often times on a business policy, the liability is only for what happens on site. Often times, there is a separate coverage needed (such as "products and completed operations"). The thing that everyone needs to know about insurance is that it is huge and vast and varies and has all sorts of intricacies. It involves ever changing laws and every changing contracts/policies. Coverages are constantly changing! A good agent will know what he knows and what he has to find out and will do his job by going to the best source to find the answers.

I wish everyone would read what you wrote. Insurance isn't what you hope it will be or want it to be. It is a contract based on laws.

-K8memphis Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 1:57pm
post #119 of 133

Cool.

I have had continuous coverage for years with & without a business in place--just to cover my equipment and when I did do consults in the home plus my office is here.

In my experience insurance agents are sales people selling as much insurance as they can they're not concerned with so much red tape beyond that. And not that they should either I'm just saying.

ziggytarheel Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 2:01pm
post #120 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

Cool.

I have had continuous coverage for years with & without a business in place--just to cover my equipment and when I did do consults in the home plus my office is here.

In my experience insurance agents are sales people selling as much insurance as they can they're not concerned with so much red tape beyond that. And not that they should either I'm just saying.




Your experience with insurance agents is very unfortunate. There are better ones out there. I know because I've worked for one for well over a decade. Plus, it IS in their best interest to inform you well as to what you are purchasing and if it fits your needs. They are playing Russian Roulette with an E&O claim (Errors and Omissions) if they aren't. A wise agent goes overboard documenting what coverages you have and don't have just to cover themselves...because they know a customer can and will sue them!

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