Chocolate Plastic/paste?

Baking By FarrahFace Updated 15 Oct 2009 , 1:50am by cakesweetiecake

FarrahFace Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 5:13am
post #1 of 9

Hi, I was wondering if someone can please help me. I make people figures out of fondant and I am always seeing on Ace of Cakes and Cake Boss that they use something called molding chocolate.. Does anyone know how to make it? I have looked online and found a few recipes but they don't say what type(brand) of chocolate to buy. I think all I can find is the Baker's in my grocery store.. It looks much easier to handle than fondant.. Thanks in advance for your help..

LaDonna

8 replies
xstitcher Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 5:25am
post #2 of 9

Modeling chocolate/candy clay/chocolate leather/chocolate clay are all basically the same thing. Some people use really expensive chocolate, some use the cheapest, some use chips, others use bars, candy melts, almond bark and so on. It really depends on what you like. I have used almond bark, I've used white chocolate chips, I've used candy melts and the bars. Sometimes I buy what's on sale and try it out. Check out one of these recipes and try one out.

http://cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-1608-0-Chocolate-Clay-Modeling-Chocolate.html
http://cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-6383-0-Chocolate-Leather.html
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Recipes&sort=recipename&sort_dir=ASC&op=search&chname=X&chingredients=X&searchtext=candy+clay&cat_id=-1&x=&y=

drakegore Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 12:18pm
post #3 of 9

hi farrahface!

for semi-sweet, i just use regular old nestle chips (i probably should be embarrassed to admit that, lol) and it always turns out super well.

the whites and candy melts can be a bit more greasy because they have a higher fat content.

here is a thread you might find useful and there are quite a few really good threads on modelling chocolate here on CC:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=642127&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=15


diane

JGMB Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 12:36pm
post #4 of 9

I have the chance to make a golf-themed cake for a charity function next weekend. I thought I'd do an argyle pattern all around the sides, then a golf-course something on top.

I only use buttercream, so I was unsure of how to do the argyle. Do you think this modeling chocolate would work? Could I tint 2 batches, roll out, cut into diamonds, then alternate colors around the sides of the cake?

drakegore Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 12:42pm
post #5 of 9

i use modelling chocolate cutouts and ribbons on buttercream (smbc) on just about every other cake i make. i think you plan sounds good and i bet your cake-eaters will think the chocolate clay tastes more nifty than fondant icon_smile.gif

if you color the chocolate when melted be sure you use oil-based candy colors so you chocolate won't seize.

diane

JGMB Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 12:45pm
post #6 of 9

Thanks for the quick answer, Diane, and also for the recipe and all the tips that I just read in the other thread. icon_razz.gif

FarrahFace Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 1:27pm
post #7 of 9

Thanks for the quick response xsticher and drakegore. I tried making some last night and one batch was grainy the other seems very greasy.. I cant wait to try your recipe.. They use it all the time on tv and I want to use it.. Wish me luck.. Thanks again. thumbs_up.gif
LaDonna

JGMB Posted 29 Aug 2009 , 8:15pm
post #8 of 9

Modeling chocolate rocks!!! I just used it today for the first time, and I loved everything about it -- it tasted surprisingly good, it was so simple to make, and it was really easy to use.

I did the sides of an 8" round cake with an argyle pattern using the Wilton Candy Melts/Karo syrup recipe, and I was really happy with the results.

cakesweetiecake Posted 15 Oct 2009 , 1:50am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by drakegore

i use modelling chocolate cutouts and ribbons on buttercream (smbc) on just about every other cake i make. i think you plan sounds good and i bet your cake-eaters will think the chocolate clay tastes more nifty than fondant icon_smile.gif

if you color the chocolate when melted be sure you use oil-based candy colors so you chocolate won't seize.

diane




Just curious, do you refrigerate your cakes? If so, how does the modeling chocolate hold up after it's been placed on the cake?

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