Rolling Cookies Same Thickness

Baking By toleshed Updated 17 Sep 2009 , 7:40pm by CeeTee

toleshed Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 10:25pm
post #1 of 16

I have just taken a job as cookie decorator at a new bakery. At home, I use a doboard to roll the same thickness cookies. I'm not sure what to do at the bakery. Ask him to buy me a doboard, or try to guess? Anyone got any ideas?
Thanks

15 replies
Doug Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 10:46pm
post #2 of 16

well, if you can get them to spring for a dough sheeter.... icon_rolleyes.gif

but in the absence of that -- bars.

examples:
metal -- http://www.pastrychef.com/CARAMEL-BAR-SET_p_1041.html
plastic: http://www.fancyflours.com/rolling-pin-perfection-strips.html

BUT --
why spend that kind of money when you can make them yourself and possibly even get them for free?

the metal ones are just simple flat stock metal -- any good metal working shop will have it and be able to cut to the exact length you need, even the full length of your work table.

plastic ones can be trimmed off the edge of a plastic sheet (lexan stronger and will last longer -- check first at a glass shop that also install plastic sheeting. They might have trimmings that you can get for free.

finally, -- these can be made from FLAT wood molding. not all that expensive and available at any lumberyard. comes in 8 foot lengths (golly that would be a LONG sheet of dough) which you can easily trim to length needed (4 - 2 foot ones out of one piece of molding). Can make thinner by running through a planner (sort of a sander on steroids -- high end home hobbiest woodworker will have one) -- and can be left unfinished and take on the patina of use (like that ol' wooden spoon) or finished in food grade polyurethane.

use is simple -- look at plastic example link above.

one strip to each side of dough such that rolling pin can rest on a strip on each end and roll away.

---

thinner versions of these can also be used to make beautifully level sheets of chocolate. -- put down strips, pour chocolate in between, spread with wide blade.

toleshed Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 12:55am
post #3 of 16

Wow - thanks so much. Thats great
Where are you in NC off I95. Have a daughter in Charlotte

Doug Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 12:57am
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by toleshed

Wow - thanks so much. Thats great
Where are you in NC off I95. Have a daughter in Charlotte




Lumberton, formerly Oneonta and NYC, NY

cutthecake Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 1:27am
post #5 of 16

Doug,
Did you go to SUNY at Oneonta (or SUCO when I as there) by any chance?

Toleshed,
Just be sure your rolling pin can span the distance between the bars if you permanently attach them to anything. I learned this the hard way!

Doug Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 1:37am
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Doug,
Did you go to SUNY at Oneonta (or SUCO when I as there) by any chance?




Nope.

cylstrial Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 1:47am
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

well, if you can get them to spring for a dough sheeter.... icon_rolleyes.gif


LOL!!

metal -- http://www.pastrychef.com/CARAMEL-BAR-SET_p_1041.html




Love those metal bars!

dinie Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 1:51am
post #8 of 16

Why not buy the rings to go on the rolling pin, I have them in 4 different thickness. I think you can get them at any kitchen supply store.

Diane

cutthecake Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 3:06am
post #9 of 16

Doug,
Do you miss Brooks'?

Doug Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 3:22am
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Doug,
Do you miss Brooks'?




yummy! -- very different style of BBQ down here.

kneadacookie Posted 12 Aug 2009 , 3:42am
post #11 of 16

the yardsticks at home depot are a fabulous thickness. cut in half they make perfect cookies everytime

PamelaB Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 5:37pm
post #12 of 16

I love the yardstick idea. Definately going to try that.

kneadacookie Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 5:59pm
post #13 of 16

they're nice, because they don't slide off, nothing slips...

leily Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 8:03pm
post #14 of 16

I use Key Stock (the metal pieces Doug talked about in his first post) Instead of finding a metal working shop I suggest going to www.fastenal.com and looking for the closest one to you. Then call ahead and tell them that you want Stainless Steel key stock (and the size you want, it is square so you can just tell them 1/4", 3/8", or whatever thickness you want) Standard length is like 3ft and 6ft if I remember correctly. My local one cut it to the lengths I wanted, I can use them with all of my different width rollers.

bbmom Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 3:06pm
post #15 of 16

What keeps any of the strips-whether your using wood, yard sticks, metal or plastic-from moving around on your rolling surface?

CeeTee Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 7:40pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kneadacookie

the yardsticks at home depot are a fabulous thickness. cut in half they make perfect cookies everytime




Don't use yardsticks, dowels, or any kind of wooden items from Home Depot or any other hardware store for baking! All of them are sprayed with an anti-fungal chemical which is NOT Food safe. Found out about this from a Nicholas Lodge demo. Plastic or metal is ok because it can be washed.

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