First Pillar Wedding Cake... Help!

Decorating By cakehelp Updated 2 Sep 2009 , 9:36pm by lovejoywisdomfaith

cakehelp Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:10pm
post #1 of 12

I have been asked to do a wedding cake with pillars for september 5th. This makes me very nervous since I have until now only done wedding cakes that are stacked on top of each other without space between.

The cake sizes will be 6", 8" and 10". I'm attaching an image borrowed from Doug to show you what I mean. Thank you Doug btw for all your great pics!!! I use them all the time to draw on when in meetings with clients.

I am in the process of ordering pillars and plates online, and think I will be getting these items:

1 Decorator Preferred, 6" Smooth.Edge Separator Plate
1 Decorator Preferred, 8" Smooth.Edge Separator Plate
2 packs Baker's Best Disposable Pillars with Rings, 7" (it says there are 4 pillars in each pack)
I was also going to get the 10" plate, but it is not in stock at the moment, and I don't really need it anyway since it would be at the very bottom of the cake.
Are these items the right ones to get? Will the fit together. I assume that these types of push-in pillars make the cake more stable than the kind you place on top of the cake.

I have looked at pics in the Wilton yearbook on how to insert the pillars in the cake, but I can't help but feels like it will be very unstable. I assume the pillars "click" into place at the top of the pillar, where there is no contact with cake, right? The bottom part of the pillar is just pushed into the cake. I imagine that it is very important to get it perfectly straight.

How on earth will they cut the cake? I mean the bride and groom. I usually have my couples cut their piece from the top tier as it looks best in the photos. Can a cake like this be cut on the top tier?

Any suggestions, adivce or comment are greatly appreciated!! Logically, I know this should work since I have seen tons of pics with this type of cakes, but I would be mortified if the cake fell over icon_cry.gif

Thanks in advance!
Sara
LL

11 replies
Gingoodies Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:23pm
post #2 of 12

icon_surprised.gif Take a DEEEP breath. You can do this! It sounds like the equipment you have ordered will be ok. If your cakes are to have an icing border, there may not be a lot of room to support that. As to the construction, I would assemble on-site. You will need to "mark" each lower tier with the plate of the cake above it. i.e. You will need to use the feet of the 8" to mark the 10" so you know where to place the pillars. Once you get the cake set up at the site, it should be ok. I would suggest that the B&G do their cake cutting from the bottom or middle tier. It will be more stable and easier for them to reach. If you have any more questions just ask. thumbs_up.gif I have done a few cakes this way with no problems.

kimb Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:26pm
post #3 of 12

I prefer doing pillar cakes, as opposed to stacked. For me they seem easier to transport, and look much more elegant.

Anyway, if they are the push in type pillars, yes you would only need 1 plate for the 6 & 8 inch tiers.

If their not the push in, you will need 2 plates each, for 6 & 8 inch. But still need to dowel support for the 10 & 8.

You'll be suprised how easy it is.

Mencked Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:45pm
post #4 of 12

Pillars really are much easier than a stacked cake, but definitely assemble on-site! You're ordering the right stuff and it will be fine....really! I always suggest that my brides cut the piece for the pictures out of the back of the bottom tier while the cake is still assembled. That would be more stable than cutting from the top tier of a pillared cake. And it is not going to fall over! The pillars will be placed 4" into your cake tiers with 3" of pillar rising above each cake tier...very stable!

confectionaryperfection Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 4:39pm
post #5 of 12

i would use push in pillar or the hidden pillars cut to height needed.

cakehelp Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 5:17pm
post #6 of 12

Thank you everyone for your replies!
I always assemble on site, I'm too nervous to drive with an assembled cake in the car icon_biggrin.gif so that won't be a problem. Also, there will be no big borders on the tiers, so the sizes will probably work.

kimb, I totally agree with you, pillar cakes looks very elegant and if I survive this one I will definately be doing some more icon_biggrin.gif

I have not placed the order yet, but I will do so now when you have confirmed that I'm getting the right stuff. Thanks!

If they are going to be cutting from the bottom tier I will have to call the bride and ask if she wants any flavor changes. She ordered different flavors on each tier and the one she wanted most on the top one...

I'm still kind of nervous and would like to try it out one time before the wedding, but I really don't feel like baking a three tiered cake just to try it out...

Again, thanks for your input. CC is the best place ever icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

lovejoywisdomfaith Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 7:39pm
post #7 of 12

I just did a google on "how to make pillar cakes stable" and I found this post! I'm doing everything the same, right down to the tier sizes and the disposable push pillars with the rings. Only difference is I have a pearl border, so I may need to up the size of the plates.

My question is the Wilton Decorator Preferred Smooth Edge Plates do not look like they "snap" together with the pillars. I'm imagining the plates sliding off the pillars. icon_sad.gif

Sara, let me know if you have any pointers after your experience with the equipment!

indydebi Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 7:48pm
post #8 of 12

The plates will not slide off of the pillars. THe legs of the plates fit inside the holes at the top of the pillars. But don't transport a pillared cake assembled.

I agree that the push-in pillars are super easy. (I wish these had been available when I first starting doing cakes!)

As far as which cake to cut, I tell brides they can cut any tier they what ... pick the flavor and cut that one. I think traditionally, the top tier was NEVER the one cut because that one was the one they saved for their first anniversary. I think traditionally, the first piece was cut from the bottom tier because it was easier and more stable, and made for a better picture because the bride and groom didn't feel awkward reaching "up" to cut an upper tier.

cakehelp Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:07pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovejoywisdomfaith

I just did a google on "how to make pillar cakes stable" and I found this post! I'm doing everything the same, right down to the tier sizes and the disposable push pillars with the rings. Only difference is I have a pearl border, so I may need to up the size of the plates.

My question is the Wilton Decorator Preferred Smooth Edge Plates do not look like they "snap" together with the pillars. I'm imagining the plates sliding off the pillars. icon_sad.gif

Sara, let me know if you have any pointers after your experience with the equipment!




I have not done the cake yet, it's for a wedding this saturday so only a couple of days away icon_eek.gificon_surprised.gif right now I'm doing a ton of RI roses to put on that cake. I will let you know how it works out!
I have received the plates, and they are very small... I hope I will be able to pipe some sort of border that attaches to the cake, because I think the entire plate will be under the cake with the icing on. As long as it doesn't fall down I'm happy icon_biggrin.gif

/Sara

cakehelp Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:17pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi


As far as which cake to cut, I tell brides they can cut any tier they what ... pick the flavor and cut that one. I think traditionally, the top tier was NEVER the one cut because that one was the one they saved for their first anniversary. I think traditionally, the first piece was cut from the bottom tier because it was easier and more stable, and made for a better picture because the bride and groom didn't feel awkward reaching "up" to cut an upper tier.




Thanks! I will tell the bride to cut the top tier since that was the one with the flavors she wanted most. And if they feel that it is unstable she can switch to the bottom tier. Wouldn't want a bride with cake all over her dress icon_eek.gif, just thinking about this makes the butterflies in my stomach feel like a tornado... I hope I survive this one... *taking a deep breath* Here we have never had the tradition of saving cake for the anniversary, but usually we start eating cake from the top.

leah_s Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 8:19pm
post #11 of 12

Next time, try SPS. Easy. Seriously.

Good advice in this thread if you have to use the Wilton stuff.

lovejoywisdomfaith Posted 2 Sep 2009 , 9:36pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Next time, try SPS. Easy. Seriously.

Good advice in this thread if you have to use the Wilton stuff.




What is SPS?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

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