Did I Do The Right Thing?

Business By flamingobaker Updated 11 Aug 2009 , 3:11pm by CakeRx

flamingobaker Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:01pm
post #1 of 22

Delivered this cake today. Shortly after delivery the customer called asking about the crack in the center. I HAD seen the crack (caused by stupid heating core - even though I used 3 foamcore boards) and told her that any fix would be more noticeable than the crack. Should I have redone the entire orange area? She didn't really sound upset, maybe just more worried that it would spread and fall apart. Should I have offered anything other than what I said?
LL

21 replies
Mensch Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:04pm
post #2 of 22

Cute cake! Where's the crack?

flamingobaker Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:09pm
post #3 of 22

Oh dear! In in my bigger picture at home the crack shows up easier. The main part of the crack is between the bottom of the "1" and the top of the "d" The crack is small, and can be seen when you look carefully, but is not totally obvious.

OK, try this picture:
LL

cylstrial Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:18pm
post #4 of 22

I think the cake is adorable. Maybe you could send her a $10 off gift certificate in the mail or something, for her next cake to make up for the little crack.

Bonnie151 Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:45pm
post #5 of 22

Is it fondant? If so, the way to fix cracks is to make gunge by mixing fondant with water until it is gloppy. You can then smooth it onto the crack and neither the crack nor the fix will be noticeable at all - it creates a perfect finish.

kikster Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 7:46pm
post #6 of 22

I really can't believe she called you. I can BARELY see it.

mygirlssweet Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 8:12pm
post #7 of 22

She is being far to picky! I think it looks very nice. I'm sure her's would have had flaws to if she had made it herself. Don't let it bother you.

jammjenks Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 10:44pm
post #8 of 22

No, don't offer her anything. If I have to squint and get inches from my screen to even see it, then it is not big enough to worry about. Looks great to me.

Doug Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 11:04pm
post #9 of 22

on my 17" monitor, which makes it larger than life, it's hard to see.

mom sounds a bit OCD perfectionist.

---

do nothing more for her.

bamberc Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:34am
post #10 of 22

I think your cake is adorable and well done-I can barely see the crack even in the close-up. I agree with the others-the explanation that you gave her over the phone is fine. I also agree that I'm shocked that she called you.

LaBellaFlor Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:38am
post #11 of 22

Ok, its a cake and NOTHING is every perfect when handmade. I had to really look to see the crack. I think its an adorable cake by the way. Oh yeah, like the other person said, at best a $10 off coupon.

lopsidedTurntable Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:45am
post #12 of 22

Well I mean it's not that I don't want to comfort you but it's like a crack I would get in a cake--I mean right on the money dead center right where everyone's gonna be looking, reading the inscription.

So I like the little offer of a discount going forward. And I like that you did not over react when she mentioned it. It happens to the best of us.

MBHazel Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:58am
post #13 of 22

I use a heat core too and fill the hole with icing. Which looks like what you do, is that right?

I have found that if I am a little too anxious and ice before the cake is STONE COLD that the icing in the hole will do this.


At any rate, I think the cake is great. Very pretty.

cakegrandma Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:26am
post #14 of 22

When you use the heating core do you put the cake that has baked in the core back into the hole that it came out of with some icing on it? I find it much easier to use the rose nail upside down and you do not have a large hole that the heating core leaves. When you use the rose nail (or flower nail, whatever you call it) it is very simple to fill the shallow indentation up with icing. Try it and I think you will be happier with it than the heating core. Let us know how it works for you and in my opinion, the crack is so very minor I would give her 10.00 off on her next cake. Promote good will. thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif
evelyn

Adevag Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 4:53pm
post #15 of 22

What a great idea. I will definitely try this tool It makes so much more sense than to create that hole. (Why can't Wilton figure that out?). Thanks for the tip.

MBHazel Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 9:29pm
post #16 of 22

Hey Cakegrandma,

Exactly how do you use the flower nail? Do you use several for a ten inch cake, spaced how far apart?

Thanks a million!!!!

flamingobaker Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:18am
post #17 of 22

Well, she called today to RAVE about the cake, so I think yesterday she was just wanting to make sure it wasn't a disaster waiting to happen. It is buttercream.

lopsidedTurntable: I appreciate your answer, I did want to make sure I handled this professionally. icon_smile.gif I'm proud I didn't overreact, I ALMOST said "is that OK with you?" to her!

I usually use the flower nail, but this was a 16" square so I wanted to make sure....I trimmed off the bottom of the plug before putting it back in the cake, then trimmed of the top. That made it sit in there fairly firmly. You're supposed to put batter inside the heating core, right?

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:24am
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBHazel

I use a heat core too and fill the hole with icing. Which looks like what you do, is that right?

I have found that if I am a little too anxious and ice before the cake is STONE COLD that the icing in the hole will do this.


At any rate, I think the cake is great. Very pretty.




I stuff the cake from the core back into the hole - it's the right size afterall. Wouldn't putting icing in it mean that someone is going to get a big piece of icing instead of cake??

I love the cake, BTW. Very, very well done.

If she is fussy enough to call and complain about a small crack, I would offer her $10 off her next purchase - but make sure that one is perfect. If she complains again, she's "one of those customers" we all get. Get rid of her - you'll never please her.

ETA: Guess I should learn to double check and see that I've read all the posts before I respond. My bad. icon_biggrin.gif So glad she loved the cake. And yes, you are supposed to put batter inside the heating core. It helps keep the core from overheating - and you put the cake from the core back into the hole.

For the poster asking about using flower nails in lieu of heating cores - you should put as many in as you would a heating core. The general rule is 1 (core) for 10 - 12", 2 (cores) for 14 - 16", etc. The idea is to help distribute the heat so the whole cake cooks evenly. I wish I had known about the core before I baked my first 1/2 soccer ball. What a disaster that was! icon_eek.gif

messy_chef Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 12:18pm
post #19 of 22

I'm just posting to let you know I am head over heels for your cake.

flamingobaker Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 12:39pm
post #20 of 22

Just wanted to say thank you for all the kind words about the cake.
Forgot that yesterday.. icon_redface.gif

lopsidedTurntable Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:20pm
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario



I stuff the cake from the core back into the hole - it's the right size afterall...

... And yes, you are supposed to put batter inside the heating core. It helps keep the core from overheating - and you put the cake from the core back into the hole.

...




It's really hard to put the little baby core cake into the hole in the cake--it's so cute and delicious looking--it is an act of intense will power to put that puppy in that cake hole and not into your mouth.

It's this perfect mutant cupcake.

Watch out for that.
You might want to consider baking two... or three--- icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Dude, for sure you gotta hide it from the kids!!

CakeRx Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 3:11pm
post #22 of 22

LOL! In reference to keeping the core center "away from your kids": Last weekend I was doing a shower cake from home. I walked back into the kitchen after my cakes had cooled and noticed they were GONE! My boys didn't realize they weren't part of the "waste" that they enjoy with cake-leveling. icon_razz.gif

I've never tried the flower nail trick; the heating core has always been a godsend to me. I plug the hole, level the top (bellybutton), and don't coat the core with frosting first. They have always sliced up just fine! However, I think I'll try the rose nail, as this seems less intrusive. I wouldn't have thought that convection would disperse as efficiently.

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