Someone Wants A 3-Tier For 40 People

Decorating By Echooo3 Updated 15 Aug 2009 , 12:39am by juliebold

Echooo3 Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:07pm
post #1 of 31

She REALLY wants 3-tiers but only for 40 people. How can I make that possible? She wants the bottom square, milddle round, top square.

Anyone???

30 replies
-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:19pm
post #2 of 31

7 inch sq x 6 inch round x 3.5 inch square

Be like 40 something servings

You'd have to cut this out of larger cake probably.

Marci Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:23pm
post #3 of 31

Make a 4" square, a 6" round and an 8" square (maybe a 10" square on the bottom for better spacing). You may have to cut a 6" square down, but if you use a ruler, it isn't hard. Or, you could make a bigger cake and charge more money.

emiyeric Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:23pm
post #4 of 31

Or how about using a dummy for one of the tiers?

summernoelle Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:26pm
post #5 of 31

I've done 4 inches on the top before, but only for people I really like. Because, it's the same amount of work as a cake that feeds 60, for less money.

Echooo3 Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:29pm
post #6 of 31

Thanks, great suggestions. This website is the BEST!! I spend waaaaaay too much time on here though.

indydebi Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:18am
post #7 of 31

I'm with summer ..... no super small cakes unless it's someone I REALLY like. Or there will be a PITA charge, so they might as well just buy a "regular" tiered cake!

My smallest 3 tier like she wants is a 6S/8R/10S ... serves 18/24/50 = 92 servings.

diane Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:25am
post #8 of 31

is this order really worth it??? 3 tiers for 40 people?? icon_confused.gif

Rylan Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 5:57am
post #9 of 31

I like to make tiered cakes even if only 5 will eat it.

Tell her that she will have to get an XX servings with a 3 tiered cake. If she want to just get around 40, then explain that it will be really small.

Toptier Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 4:46pm
post #10 of 31

I agree with Rylan, she is probably envisioning a bigger cake than she is going to get...if you do a three tier that only serves 40. I would pull out dummies or boxes or something to show her the actual size. Everytime I do this the customer upsizes the cake because they want something grander.

I mean, really a three tier for 40 is going to be so small! And, forgetaboutit if they want a cake topper on a 4", ain't gonna happen.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 11:35pm
post #11 of 31

I second the notion to use a dummy for one of the layers. That way she'll get the image she wants and the amount of cake too.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:35am
post #12 of 31

I would use a dummy for the largest size. Using IndyDebi's slice count (18/24/50), making the bottom a dummy cake would give you 42 slices of actual cake - close enough. Just remember to roll the corners of the dummy so as to take the sharp edge off before applying the fondant (if you're using fondant, that is).

lopsidedTurntable Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:55am
post #13 of 31

I like petite cakes. I mean this is why we set minimums, right? -- some have a minimum dollar amount and some have a minimum size--but I mean if the chick only wants to pay for 40 servings--I think it'd be a cute cake.

Cathy26 Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 12:45pm
post #14 of 31

i do minature 2 and 3 tiers cakes - 4, 6 and 8 for people who want the look of a tiered cake. i love doing them they look so cute and id rather do a tiered cake than a big single tier any day icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:03pm
post #15 of 31

You should make sure she knows how big one serving is, too. She might be thinking of a huge, honking piece of cake when she's thinking of one serving. Make sure to tell her how to cut the cake when you give it to her, or you'll be getting a call that there wasn't enough cake!

monkeny Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:08pm
post #16 of 31

Okay, I am a total newbie but when I have a party and have a cake envisioned, even if there are only 40 people there to eat it, I don't care I can have leftovers (for days icon_smile.gif )and so can anyone else there that wants them. If I am willing to pay the money in the first place then let me! I agree with Rylan explain if you want 3 Tier Cake it feeds this many and if she only WANTS 40 it will be SMALL. Let Customer decide if she wants to spend money on extra unused cake to get the look she wants.

kakeladi Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:46pm
post #17 of 31

Definitely let customer know the size of each serving. Let them know it is not always possible to exactly match their serving request and the best you can offer is XXX.
Something that has not been mentioned is make only 2"/1 layer tiers.

lopsidedTurntable Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:55pm
post #18 of 31

Y'know it's valid to suggest a bigger cake--but she's gotta pay for it too. Sure the customer always needs to know the size of everything but it's not like immoral or something to make a tiny one.

It's like, you wanna cake for 40? Oh sure, here's one for 90--double the price icon_biggrin.gif That could be a little awkward--so if you got minimums or need to apply some--make it up real quick. Minimum money minimum size, whatever.

But go easy suggesting these ginormous cakes.

And there's nothing wrong with a wedding size serving of cake--it's been ok for decades.

Margaret Braun makes some very small cakes. I think they're awesome--I'm sure we all do but...

I mean she's made 2" tiers that are 4" tall.

She commonly makes 4" tiers that are 4" tall.

It's ok.

Mensch Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 1:58pm
post #19 of 31

The smallest cake I'll do is an 8-5-4, normal height. I charge my normal price for this, but every time I do one of those dinky 4-inchers I curse and say that it's the last one.

indydebi Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 2:25pm
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mensch

The smallest cake I'll do is an 8-5-4, normal height. I charge my normal price for this, but every time I do one of those dinky 4-inchers I curse and say that it's the last one.




exactly. dealing with a 6" cake irritates me, let alone a 4 incher! icon_mad.gif THat's why I wont' do 'em.

lopsidedTurntable Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 2:44pm
post #21 of 31

6" rounds are like so many toilet paper rolls huh.

Idea for whosoever--fill your bag with icing and just use a coupler no tip or just clip off a nice chunk of the tip if you use parchment or plastic--pipe the icing on the cake--just go 'round & round--twirl the turntable--have it set on a nice piece of nubbly shelf liner so you don't have to chase it.

Then smooth ~~ viola ~~ easy peasy.

Oh also, I flip my turntable over to use the small end when necessary -- used to flip my boss out--really upset her cake equilibrium--so I loved to do it. icon_biggrin.gif

lopsidedTurntable Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 3:30pm
post #22 of 31

And I just wanna say, making baby cakes--y'know maybe not for an order but just for fun is really fun.

I got one in my photos a super teeny one--it was for family so I didn't 'clean' it up but it was cool--I had just come back into cakin' from retirement and I kept hearing about 'table cakes'...

http://acmecakes.com/images/RIMG0310.JPG

http://acmecakes.com/images/RIMG02993.JPG

same cake--also a testament to my unique photographic abilities.

icon_biggrin.gif

jdub253 Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 10:18pm
post #23 of 31

Can you make the middle layer thinner? I'm doing a 3 tier this weekend for about 30. 9 in (two 2 in layers) 8 in (one 2 in layer) 6 in (two 2 in layers).

Also, they may want to keep the top layer for that silly top layer in the freezer for your first anniversary tradition. ???

-K8memphis Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 10:47pm
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdub253

Can you make the middle layer thinner? I'm doing a 3 tier this weekend for about 30. 9 in (two 2 in layers) 8 in (one 2 in layer) 6 in (two 2 in layers).

Also, they may want to keep the top layer for that silly top layer in the freezer for your first anniversary tradition. ???




You're making over 60 servings though.
You've doubled it.

indydebi Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 11:02pm
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdub253

Also, they may want to keep the top layer for that silly top layer in the freezer for your first anniversary tradition. ???



None of my brides do that anymore. I think it's moving to the "that's what gramma did in her day" column. All of them opt to come back to get the free fresh tier on their anniversary. They think this is an awesome idea.

juliebold Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 11:11pm
post #26 of 31

indydebi, I like the idea of offering them a fresh cake for their anniversay.

indydebi Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 11:20pm
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by juliebold

indydebi, I like the idea of offering them a fresh cake for their anniversay.


A lot of cakers do this.

It also works out with the new generation demographics. "Back in my day", we got married, had a steady job, bought a house and stayed put. The cake was nice and stable in a freezer for a year. But today, we are more mobile. No one stays in a job for 25 years. More active military means more moving from base to base or postponing buying a house. Cake is a pain to store, to move to the new apartment, it thaws-freezes-thaws-freezes and tastes like crap in a year.

When my brides come back for their free cake, they love telling me stories of how they "brag" to all of their friends how they get a free FRESH cake instead of having to eat a year-old-frozen thing.

Great selling tool! thumbs_up.gif

juliebold Posted 15 Aug 2009 , 12:26am
post #28 of 31

It the first time I heard about it. All the brides here always ask for a box for the top cake. I would rather do this. Great follow up with new brides. I always thought it was gross to eat year old cake.

costumeczar Posted 15 Aug 2009 , 12:33am
post #29 of 31

I just had one girl email me to tell me how delicious her year-old cake was! icon_confused.gif Yuck... I still give them a box for the top tier, it prevents me having to deal with keeping track of how many teeny cakes I have to make in a year. If they want one they can buy one, but they have to make the effort!

indydebi Posted 15 Aug 2009 , 12:34am
post #30 of 31

Oh I dont' keep track. If they call me, fine. If they dont', then it's a cake I dont' make. But I'm not setting aside time to make phone calls of "Are you ready for your anniv cake yet?"

And it keeps them talking about me for a year! thumbs_up.gif

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