Smbc In Fridge?

Decorating By SaraClassic Updated 19 Aug 2009 , 11:02pm by dsilbern

SaraClassic Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 3:46pm
post #1 of 15

Soooo just made SMBC for the 1st time, love the texture, I think I may have let the eggs get too cooked as there are tiny pieces in some of the BC but its still great. But on the recipe I used... no info on the refrigeration. I mean I know I "cooked" the eggs and the sugar does help the butter stay OK for a day or 2 in normal BC, but what about this one? I knwo I can also put it in the freezer, thats awesome, sooo, in or on the counter? ( I want to leave it out till tomorrow afternoon )

14 replies
SaraClassic Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 4:20pm
post #2 of 15

bump icon_biggrin.gif

-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 4:38pm
post #3 of 15

I leave mine out for a day or two at air conditioned room temp.
So does Margaret Braun in her book Cakewalk.

SaraClassic Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 4:43pm
post #4 of 15

Thanks so much!! I have it out and was glad to get a response in case I should have it in the fridge icon_lol.gif

drakegore Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 9:36pm
post #5 of 15

it should be really hard to cook the eggs in smbc because the sugar should prevent coagulation/cooking. i know this wasn't your question, but i feel compelled to be a busybody icon_smile.gif

mix your eggs and sugar thoroughly with a whisk first. your egg white/sugar mixture should be in a bowl placed in gently boiling water (i use my kitchen-aid bowl and it goes straight from water to mixer).
it should only take 3-4 minutes for the eggs to get to 160 degrees, constantly stirring.

for my family i am fine leaving it out in an air conditioned room all day, but i pop it in the fridge after dessert. when baking for someone else, it stay's fridged until it is time to deliver or 3 hours before eating.

there is a lot of debate about just how long is ok, but most people generally agree a day is fine.

diane

-K8memphis Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 9:58pm
post #6 of 15

Diane, it's the movement of the whisk that keeps the eggs from cooking. The sugar doesn't have anything to do with it. If the whisking slows or is not consistent enough the eggs cook.

And actually the boiling water should not touch the egg pan--the two pans should fit together well for best results--not a lot of wiggle room between them but enough room where the water can boil below and not touch the bottom of the egg & sugar pan.

There's probably nothing too wrong with placing the mixer bowl in boiling water but I think you run the risk of not getting it all cooked--not sure.

I too used my mixer bowl until I found a great stainless bowl that fits my pot of boiling water nicey nice.

drakegore Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:32pm
post #7 of 15

hi k8,

i respectfully disagree icon_smile.gif. i believe the science of it is correct (sugar prevents coagulation). whisking prevent burning and is also a mechanical means of preventing coagulation but the chemical science of the sugar prevents the coagulation (i should state that i am soooo not a scientist, but this is what i have read repeatedly from books on the subject).

i would think you would get better heat from the water touching the pan than from hanging above it. i use my thermometer and keep close tabs on the temp and 3-4 minutes is what it takes to reach a consistent temp of 160 degrees (for egg safety). i cannot think of a book i have read that said anything other than the method i use (though i am sure there are many equally fine ways to approach this), so i feel pretty comfy with it icon_smile.gif.
i am sure both methods work well.

diane

-K8memphis Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:02am
post #8 of 15

Sugar prevents coagulation until you add the heat.
If you don't stir you get some sweet scrambled eggs.

Interesting about the water--the recipes I am reviewing say to put the egg/sugar mixture over simmering water--it's a double boiler type recipe and the gist of it is you're cooking with steam.

Glad it works for you.

Charmed Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:28am
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

Sugar prevents coagulation until you add the heat.
If you don't stir you get some sweet scrambled eggs.

Interesting about the water--the recipes I am reviewing say to put the egg/sugar mixture over simmering water--it's a double boiler type recipe and the gist of it is you're cooking with steam.

Glad it works for you.




I know this doesn't have anything to do with SMBC but does the same temperature(160 F) applies to cooking egg yolks if they are cooked in a double boiler? ( I am so scared of undercooking stuff!!!)

2SchnauzerLady Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:55am
post #10 of 15

charmed, if you are so nervous about undercooking the eggs, are you using a thermometer to check to see if you've reached 160, I know there are experts that just know by sight and feel, but personally, I would have to measure the temp!
K8 and Diane - you can reach the same temp by either method - just as you can get a severe burn from either method! (I used to work in the ER)

Charmed Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 7:40pm
post #11 of 15

I use a thermometer all the time!! just wasn't sure at what temp egg yolks are considered to be cooked and safe.

__Jamie__ Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 7:45pm
post #12 of 15

Lol.....and me on the other hand, am so glad I don't have to cook my pork chops all the way through anymore. icon_biggrin.gif

sugarMomma Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 5:46am
post #13 of 15

I'd heard that if you whisk the sugar/egg mixture until it's not grainy it's past the needed 160 degrees since sugar melts at a higher temperature, so no need for a thermometer. Just what I heard, but it worked for me.

-K8memphis Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 11:56am
post #14 of 15

Well actually sugar melts before 160 according to my thermometer. I can make entire batches without getting to 160 if I'm not careful.

And the safety number for eggs is 160, both whites & yolks.

dsilbern Posted 19 Aug 2009 , 11:02pm
post #15 of 15

Hi! I'm a newbie and I want to make SMBC this Friday and ice a cake on Monday for Tuesday deliver. I know to keep the cake in the fridge after I frost it but will the buttercream be OK in the fridge for 3 days? Even if it's OK food safety wise will the quality degrade?

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%