Why Did My Cake Bake Like This?

Decorating By MamaMayhem Updated 8 Aug 2009 , 12:00pm by Mike1394

MamaMayhem Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 10:43pm
post #1 of 19

My cake came out of the oven with a large dome in the center and an indented lip (that's the best way I can think to describe it) all the way around. It was the first time I used my wilton pan. Was it the pan, the cake, the oven? [/img]

18 replies
Deb_ Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 11:01pm
post #2 of 19

Sometimes it's the recipe too..........was it the first time you used this recipe?

Any of those things you mentioned could be a factor. You could try using the bake even strips around the outside of your pans to help the edges rise evenly with the center.

xstitcher Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 11:06pm
post #3 of 19

I like using the bake even strips that Deb mentioned and I also like using an inverted greased flower nail.

MamaMayhem Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 11:18pm
post #4 of 19

I've used the recipe before, it's the recipe on the back of the hershey's cocoa . But this is the first time I used the special dark cocoa powder. I've just never had such a BIG dome or lip LOL

Deb_ Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 11:30pm
post #5 of 19

Oh that's one of my favorite choc cake recipes. I've never used the Hershey's Dark either, so maybe it did have something to do with it. I can't find the Hershey's Dark here in MA or RI, not sure why.

kakeladi Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 6:28pm
post #6 of 19

What temp are you baking at? Have you tried turning the oven down? I bake most of my cakes at 300 some 325 but *never!* higher.
Actually it sounds like you might have mis-measured some ingredient(s). It could easily happen if you get distracted the least bit.

sweet-thing Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 6:41pm
post #7 of 19

Does everyone bake at a lower temp. like that? What does it do? How long do you have to bake at that temp? So if a recipe says 350 you just turn it down and bake it longer? I am learning so many tricks on here!

Rylan Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 7:36pm
post #8 of 19

I always bake in 325. It actually depends on the recipe for how long it should be baked.

Bonavolonta Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 7:49pm
post #9 of 19

Did you over mix your batter? That could cause a dome also.

Uniqueask Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 8:01pm
post #10 of 19

Sometimes when I open my oven too early, that happens, I think you have to wait 15 or 20 mins after you put it in the first time before you check it,

Please correct me if I am Wrong

DeeDelightful Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 9:25pm
post #11 of 19

I learned on here to bake at 325 and i always use the bake even strips with the wilton pans. i even baked a pound cake in a Nordicware bundt pan for 325 for about 50 minutes and it came out flat on top....a flat pound cake, imagine that! it didn't have all that good crusty pound cake lumpiness on top, so that proved to me that the lower temp makes a more level cake.

MamaMayhem Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 9:53pm
post #12 of 19

Ah, I baked at 325. That probably had a lot to do with it.

diane Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 10:10pm
post #13 of 19

i just baked a cake and that's how mine turned out. i didn't use the bake even strips...didn't intent to because it's going to be carved. but when i do use the strips i don't have that problem. icon_wink.gif

xstitcher Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 10:41pm
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaMayhem

Ah, I baked at 325. That probably had a lot to do with it.




Baking at 325 degrees is a good idea. I would suggest that you go over to Walmart (or elsewhere) and buy an oven thermometer just to make sure your oven temperature is accurate. It's not very costly and well worth it.
I leave mine in the oven at all times so I can ensure that the oven temp is correct.

MamaMayhem Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 12:30am
post #15 of 19

Oops, I meant I baked at 350 and SHOULD have baked at 325 icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 12:39am
post #16 of 19

......think you have to wait 15 or 20 mins after you put it in the first time before you check it, ........

No, no....one should not check on the cake until the time is almost up. The amount of time depends on the size of the cake being baked. It could be as little as 20 minutes for any size up to 10" (2" deep pans) but much longer for sizes up to 16".
For the most part one should not bake by time. Learn to bake with your noseicon_smile.gif When you can smell that wonderful aroma it's time to check on the cake. If it is *just* starting to pull away from the sides it is done.

Bonavolonta Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 4:00am
post #17 of 19

Well said. I too use my nose to determine my cakes doneness. I just bought "The Dessert Bible" by Richard Kimball (from Americas Test Kitchen). Although I love his recipes and respect his expertise, he says to rotate your cakes half way through the cooking time. Doesn't that sound crazy!!??! To open your oven and jiggle around an half baked cake!?

SugarFrosted Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 6:17am
post #18 of 19

My oven is hotter on one side than the other, so for the last 20 years, I have rotated every cake pan (very carefully) after 11mins. and then again after another 11 mins. for however long the cake takes till it's done. My cakes have always been fine. I have never had a cake "fall" or whatever. I must live a charmed life. icon_wink.gif

Mike1394 Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 12:00pm
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonavolonta

Well said. I too use my nose to determine my cakes doneness. I just bought "The Dessert Bible" by Richard Kimball (from Americas Test Kitchen). Although I love his recipes and respect his expertise, he says to rotate your cakes half way through the cooking time. Doesn't that sound crazy!!??! To open your oven and jiggle around an half baked cake!?




No it don't about 1/2 way through I move pans from top to bottom, and rotate. You just have to do it fast so the oven doesn't cool down.

Mike

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