brea1026 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 3:17pm
post #1 of

Does anyone use these as their base for wedding cakes?

I would like to try these because I am doing a 8",12",16" wedding cake. I use the sps system and will stack/decorate before I deliver. I was thinking of using the masonite board because I don't want to chance a regular cake board not being strong enough to hold all that. And last- Global Sugar Art is out of the 20" x 1/2" round boards, but they do have the 20" x 1/4" rounds. Will that be strong enough for this cake?

Also, when you cover the board in fondant, do you put anthing on the board to make the fondant stick to it?

Thanks for any help you may have!

40 replies
BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 10:30pm
post #2 of

You can buy masonite at the big box home stores then cut it to the size you need. My friend only uses it and she puts her contact info on the bottom so she gets them back. When I cover a board with fondant I LIGHTLY dampen the board first.

Rylan Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 11:50pm
post #3 of

I use MDF or melamin boards.

cutthecake Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 12:15am
post #4 of

Rylan,
Where do you buy melamine? I've been looking for it, and the people in the hardware stores look at me like I have two heads. One guy told me he hasn't seen it since the 1960's!
Thanks.

pumpkinroses Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 12:35am
post #5 of

I use the masonite boards but I also glue 2 pieces of 1/4" (I think) form board to it so its about 3/4" thick and will easily be edged with a ribbon.

cnhiatt Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 12:44am
post #6 of

The boards I usually use are plywood, but before I cover them with fondant, I put a very very thin layer of piping gel on it to make sure the fondant sticks. It works really well on my boards, and I guess it would work for Masonite too.

PinkZiab Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:39am
post #7 of

I usually use 1/2" but the 1/4" will be fine... I smear the board with shortening, but piping gel or water will work fine to adhere the fondant.

cylstrial Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:54am
post #8 of

I love masonite boards! They are the best!! I almost always use them!

Arriva Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:00am
post #9 of

I hope the only dumb question is the one that is not asked.....I assume that the boards clean up nicely after adhering the fondant with water or piping gel? I just bought my first masonite board and haven't tried it yet. Thank you.

PinkZiab Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arriva

I hope the only dumb question is the one that is not asked.....I assume that the boards clean up nicely after adhering the fondant with water or piping gel? I just bought my first masonite board and haven't tried it yet. Thank you.




I don't clean them up... they are a consumable item for me and I build the cost into the price of the cake, so I don't have to worry about getting them back. I use masonite under every tier as well as the baseboard.

Rylan Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 3:22am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Rylan,
Where do you buy melamine? I've been looking for it, and the people in the hardware stores look at me like I have two heads. One guy told me he hasn't seen it since the 1960's!
Thanks.




It is like MDF with some type of white or sometimes wood grain laminate you find in stores such as Home Depot or Lowes. I'm not sure which melamine board you are reffering to though. Do you know what I am talking about?

I always cover my boards with plastic wrap and then cover in fondant.

alidpayne Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 4:55am

Ok, so I guess since I work @ Lowe's I should know the answer to this, but what the heck is masonite? I know what melamine is, but I have NO idea what masonite is.

cylstrial Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 12:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by alidpayne

Ok, so I guess since I work @ Lowe's I should know the answer to this, but what the heck is masonite? I know what melamine is, but I have NO idea what masonite is.





It's a thin little board (1/4th or 1/8th thickness). But yet they can carry a lot of weight.

Here's a link so you can see what they look like.

http://www.intotheoven.com/Cake-Essentials-Masonite-Boards-Square/c46_81_188/index.html

Uniqueask Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:18pm

Please tell me what is melamine never heard of it before

rmelendrez Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 1:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by alidpayne

Ok, so I guess since I work @ Lowe's I should know the answer to this, but what the heck is masonite? I know what melamine is, but I have NO idea what masonite is.




It's a thin little board (1/4th or 1/8th thickness). But yet they can carry a lot of weight.

Here's a link so you can see what they look like.

http://www.intotheoven.com/Cake-Essentials-Masonite-Boards-Square/c46_81_188/index.html




Err Im confused LOL! ...please clarify...Are the masonite boards used instead of a cake baseboard, with a cake baseboard or stand alone? Thanks everyone...pictures would be really helpful...I'm the visual kind-of-decorator LOL! LOL!

alidpayne Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:37pm

Ok, so I am totally going to have to check into the masonite boards when I work on Saturday. Does it come in small pieces or is it like 4x8 sheets in the plywood aisle?

Uniqueask, Melamine is a composite board with a (usually) white super smooth outside layer (a lot like a laminate countertop). You can buy this in many different sizes including precut shelving boards.

-Tubbs Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 3:31pm

The term 'MDF' is also used (medium-density fibreboard). I believe Masonite is a brand name - is that correct? Comes in various sizes and thicknesses.

Yesterday I bought a 24x24" 3/4" thick MDF board from Home Depot ($6) and just came in from cutting it into a hexagon shape for the wedding cake I'm working on for Saturday. I used the table saw to cut it. That cake will have a solid base! (NB - I would have used 1/2" thick if they'd had it...)

cylstrial Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 12:02am

[/quote]

Err Im confused LOL! ...please clarify...Are the masonite boards used instead of a cake baseboard, with a cake baseboard or stand alone? Thanks everyone...pictures would be really helpful...I'm the visual kind-of-decorator LOL! LOL![/quote]

The masonite board will be the final cake board that you use. So you won't put anything else underneath it. You will have your cake, and then the cardboard that the cake sits on, and then the masonite. Here's a picture.

The bottom thing with the notes on it is the masonite board. Hope this helps.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1323953

PinkZiab Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 12:15am

[quote="cylstrial"The masonite board will be the final cake board that you use. So you won't put anything else underneath it. You will have your cake, and then the cardboard that the cake sits on, and then the masonite.[/quote]

I actually use 1/4" masonite instead of cardboard under every tier as well... my cakes are heavy, but SOLID and I've nevrer had a collapse!

brea1026 Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 3:03am

Thank you all for the GREAT info! I think I am going to get the masonite board for this one. =0)

One more question: Does anyone know if Lowes or HD sells round boards? I know that they don't cut round shapes, but I don't know if they sell precut circles.

alidpayne Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 3:20am

The only thing I have ever seen us have that is precut round is pondorosa pine panels, they are like an inch thick (most people use them for tabletops).

PinkZiab Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 3:22am

I actually get my masonite pre-cut in all the standard sizes where i get all of my cake supplies.

cylstrial Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 1:09pm

Oh, I did forget to say that you might actually want to cut out a piece of foam board and hot glue it to the bottom of the masonite cake board. That way, you'll be able to lift the cake off of the table a lot easier.


And sorry Pink - I forgot that you use the masonite on each tier. Maybe one day I'll get there, but right now as a hobby cake baker, I can't really afford to put masonite on each tier.

But I'm sure it does make for a much sturdier cake.

Rylan Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 6:29pm

MDF is extremely cheap btw.

RobzC8kz Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 10:33pm

Just make sure you watch dog those boards! I've had so many get "thrown away" or "lost" that I had to start charging deposits...even to family members!!

cylstrial Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 1:28am
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobzC8kz

Just make sure you watch dog those boards! I've had so many get "thrown away" or "lost" that I had to start charging deposits...even to family members!!




Yes, I always want mine back if it's for family!

Jeff_Arnett Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 10:33pm

sugar craft dot com also has them in 1/2 inch thickness....they're great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by alidpayne

Ok, so I guess since I work @ Lowe's I should know the answer to this, but what the heck is masonite? I know what melamine is, but I have NO idea what masonite is.




It's a thin little board (1/4th or 1/8th thickness). But yet they can carry a lot of weight.

Here's a link so you can see what they look like.

http://www.intotheoven.com/Cake-Essentials-Masonite-Boards-Square/c46_81_188/index.html


tracycakes Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 2:21am

I love using mdf for larger cakes and I also consider it disposable and don't expect it back. It's cheap, cuts easy and is great for large or heavy cakes. I've also used the 1/4" masonite boards for tiered cakes and it is STURDY.

ptanyer Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 3:37am

I use MDF that I buy in large squares from Lowes (our Lowes doesn't carry masonite) and cut the shape I need. After sanding, I put my name on the bottom, cover it with contact paper. When ready to cover with fondant, I brush it with piping gel and cover the top and sides with fondant, and finish with a ribbon.

xstitcher Posted 9 Aug 2009 , 6:30am

Someone had asked what masonite was here's a link (can't remember who, sorry):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masonite

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%