Wedding Sheet Cake, Layers Or Not?

Decorating By Kookie Updated 5 Aug 2009 , 9:11pm by cutthecake

Kookie Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:22am
post #1 of 11

I am going to make four tiered cake with a sheet cake for a wedding.
The tiered cake will be two layers.
Should I make two layer sheet cake too?
Do you always make one layer or two layers for a wedding sheet cake?
Do I need to ask the clients which one do they want?

Thanks.

10 replies
Cake_Princess Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:29am
post #2 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kookie

I am going to make four tiered cake with a sheet cake for a wedding.
The tiered cake will be two layers.
Should I make two layer sheet cake too?
Do you always make one layer or two layers for a wedding sheet cake?
Do I need to ask the clients which one do they want?

Thanks.




Well the decision lies with the person who ordered the cake. You need to find out what they want.

If they want sheet cakes, I find it lools nicer when layered. This way The guest never has to know it's a sheet cake instead of the actual wedding cake.

msauer Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:43am
post #3 of 11

I agree that the customer should have the final say, but when I do sheet cakes, I always do them the same as the main cake (I do 4 layers of cake) for the same reason Cake_Princess stated.

I did however do sheet cake for a wedding the weekend before last where the bride chose 4 layers for main cake and 2 layers for sheet cake because she wanted to save some $$. I really wanted the order for 400 as well...it worked out for both of us.


-Michelle

Kookie Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 3:49pm
post #4 of 11

You guys are right.
I will ask my clients.
Thank you for answering my questions.
Kookie

Kitagrl Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:01pm
post #5 of 11

Yeah I would do it however they are doing the wedding cake so the guests can't tell which cake its from.

ZAKIA6 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:01pm
post #6 of 11

if i do a wedding and they need extra kitchen cakes, the cakes are torted to match the wedding cakes. once they are cut you cant tell the difference.

so for example if the wedding cake is 3 layers - the kitchen cake will be 3 layers etc.

__Jamie__ Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:07pm
post #7 of 11

It ceases to be a sheet cake at that point, (heh heh) and is now a kitchen cake. Let's see, Look at the huge slices from the "real" cake! Wait, what is this puny little chunk on my cake, it's from a sheet cake? What the heck?!"

Kitchen cakes=same size and usually filling as "real" cake, with none of the fancy details.

cutthecake Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:26pm
post #8 of 11

If I'm a guest at a wedding, I sure don't want a puny single or double layer of cake if the guy next to me got the last honkin' big four layer chunk. I'd take back my gift and give them a smaller one.

__Jamie__ Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:34pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

If I'm a guest at a wedding, I sure don't want a puny single or double layer of cake if the guy next to me got the last honkin' big four layer chunk. I'd take back my gift and give them a smaller one.




icon_lol.gif Exactly! Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't part of the tradition of bride's cakes, is that it is a thank you to the guests?

msauer Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 4:49pm
post #10 of 11

I do believe you are correct Jamie! Oh, and by the way...love your avatar! Too funny!

-Michelle

cutthecake Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 9:11pm
post #11 of 11

And I thought groom's cakes were for the guests to take home. I seem to remember my mother talking about them a long, long time ago. I think the custom around here was for groom's cakes to be fruit cake of some sort.
But I have not ever been to a wedding where I saw a groom's cake. I think they were in fashion in the 1940's, then faded from popularity. I guess they're back, but I still haven't seen one.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%