Fondant Over Top Of Tier In A Curvy Design (Hard To Explain)

Decorating By Larkin121 Updated 6 Aug 2009 , 2:13pm by DianeLM

Larkin121 Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 7:54pm
post #1 of 17

Now that I'm trying to find an example, I'm having a hard time. Some cakes, especially topsy kinds, have a second color of fondant layed over the top of the tier, and it's got curvy lines... scalloped is the word maybe.

Like, this one sorta, except this one is not even and the ones I mean are even:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1311139

Do you know what I'm talking about?

How do I do it? I'm making my sister a mad hatter style cake for her birthday this month and I want to do that to one tier. Do I need a special cutter?

16 replies
Renaejrk Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 10:57pm
post #2 of 17

you could use a scalloped edge cutter, or you could find/print a template for the right size circle you need with a scalloped edge and cut the fondant that way. You may even be able to find a cookie cutter with scalloped edges, though it may be hard to find the right size - I always look online to see what I can find! Good luck!

Rylan Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 12:00am
post #3 of 17

Cut a wavy circle, lift it and put it on top of the fondanted cake.

Larkin121 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 1:38am
post #4 of 17

Lol, Rylan, your response makes me feel like "duh!" You mean, just like with a pizza cutter, go around and make a wavy circle? That would be so obvious and make me quite stupid. hahaha. But that totally makes sense. That wouldn't necessarily be totally even, but I suppose for a topsy turvy it wouldn't matter.

DianeLM Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 1:46am
post #5 of 17

Depending on the look you're after, I have found it MUCH easier to roll out a thin sheet of fondant, cut a wavy line across, then apply it around the BOTTOM of the tier. It gives the illusion of a wavy 'cap', but is a lot easier.

When you apply the fondant circle to the top of the cake, sometimes the waves wind up too close together. Because when you cut the waves out, the circle is FLAT. When you apply it to the cake, the outer edge of the circle is no longer flat and it could distort your shape. Try it on the bottom of a cake pan to see what I mean.

Michele25 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 1:59am
post #6 of 17

Diane, I was looking through your photos to see if I could get a visual of what you were describing and I came across your "Baby It's Cold Outside" cake (unbelievably gorgeous, by the way). How did you get the wavy fondant caps on top of those tiers?

Michele25 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 2:00am
post #7 of 17

Diane, I was looking through your photos to see if I could get a visual of what you were describing and I came across your "Baby It's Cold Outside" cake (unbelievably gorgeous, by the way). How did you get the wavy fondant caps on top of those tiers?

Larkin121 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 2:49am
post #8 of 17

Oh, Diane, that baby shower cake is exactly what I'm talking about!! Did you do that in the bottom of the tier way you are talking about? Or on top? Just curious. Love that cake!

DianeLM Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 1:51pm
post #9 of 17

Thank you Michele and Larkin121 for your sweet compliments!

Actually, on that cake, the fondant is applied to the top - and rather thickly. I needed it to really stand out for the snow effect. Each cap got a 'dress rehearsal' on a dummy before I put it on the cake, just to make sure all the waves were right.

Here are a couple of cakes where the fondant was applied to the bottom. Since this technique is a fairly new discovery for me, I don't have many examples yet.
LL
LL

Libberator3000 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 3:52pm
post #10 of 17

DianeLM, I just died looking at your pictures. I am a newbie and very determined. I've been self-teaching, and I've made two fondant cakes. I'm totally addicted now...but you are so amazing I can't believe it. Your cakes are in a class above everything I've seen. I noticed that someone asked you how you get your corners so sharp, and you asked them to pm you. That is actually the question that sent me to this site. Would you mind if I ask you, as well, for your technique? If you have any other published helps or instructionals, I'd be very interested in those, as well. I want to make not just cute cakes, but ones that look perfect as well....not with rounded lumpy corners and cracking fondant that I can't get the cornstarch dust off of. Heheh.

DianeLM Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 5:57pm
post #11 of 17

Libberator, you made me blush! Thank you so much for the sweet compliments. You need to browse this site more. I'm small potatoes compared to some of the talent here. Check out sugarshack's cakes. By comparison, mine look like they were made by a chimp.

Speaking of sugarshack, if you want to learn how to do fondant, buy her DVD, "Flawless Fondant". It will pretty much answer all your questions.

For me, the best way to get sharp corners is to partially freeze the cake before covering with fondant. If you pop a room temp cake into the freezer for about 30-45 minutes, only the outside of the cake will freeze. The inside will still be thawed. That gives plenty of time to work with the fondant before the rest of the cake thaws.

You don't want to freeze the cake solid because too much condensation will form on the outside of your fondant while it thaws, and that may cause problems with your colors and/or decorations.

Before freezing, I like to spread on a coat of 'cake spackle'. It's just fine cake crumbs mixed with buttercream. It's great for filling in little imperfections and getting the sides of the cake perfectly smooth.

As for cracking fondant, I have the worst luck with Satin Ice white. The colors don't seem to be as bad. I prefer FondX white. It stays nice and smooth. Tastes good, too.

When working with fondant, personally, I prefer cornstarch because it's darn slippery stuff! Powdered sugar is not as slippery and can dry out your fondant as it gets mixed in. On the other hands, some people swear by powdered sugar. Just do whatever works for you.

Hope this helps!

Libberator3000 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 7:38pm
post #12 of 17

Yes! It helped very much! And thankyou for being so nice... I know we newbies probably ask the same dumb questions over and over, so I appreciate you taking the time to answer so thoughtfully!

I did use FondX, actually! I haven't seen anyone else talk about it yet! (but like you said...I need to browse the site more..hehe). I like the taste! And I used cornstarch, too!

My fondant was mostly good...but a few cracks on the upper edge...and on my bows. I waited until they were mostly dry but still pliable enough to stick them to the cake with vodka. Some of the curved edges got little cracks in them when I moved them.

About the cake spackle...why crumbs mixed in? That is what my bottom coat ends up looking like, anyway, by the time I'm done, but I thought I was trying to have less crumbs in my icing... Do I just do that with the thinned down crumb coat? Or...you mean with the top coat of frosting it seems like...

Thanks so much for the awesome tips! The freezing tip I will definitely try, and I will endeavor to have sharp corners like yours! And I will check out Sugershack's DVD as well!

I have to make a cake that looks like Machu Picchu this weekend. I'm floundering still on the design...this site and you awesome decorators are such a blessing!

Thanks so much!
Libby

jules5000 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 8:59pm
post #13 of 17

Libberator, I think these ladies have given excellent advice. I have a suggestion, but I need to ask a couple of questions. On the layer that you put on top that you want to have wavy lines You don't plan on attaching that to the cake anywhere except the top do you? On the wilton course --Fondant and gumpaste in your kit was a tool that had several shaper things on it. and the idea is a lot like the pizza cutter or pie crust shaper. there are several that have wavy lines and you could run one of the wavy line ones on the very outside of your circle before you pick it up and put it on your cake or you could lay it on your cake gently and have it on the table where you have the use of both of your hands. or on one of the turn tables. with one hand behind and underneath the edge take the wavy edge tool and cut the fondant. Yes it will be a very slow process, but I think it would work. There are also some zig-zag wheels on there. Good luck thumbs_up.gif

Libberator3000 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 9:07pm
post #14 of 17

It was actually Larkin121 and Michele25 that asked about the wavy lines. I'm just coming along for the ride in this thread. icon_biggrin.gif

Larkin121 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 9:18pm
post #15 of 17

Jules5000, I didn't take the fondant/gumpaste class from Wilton because I thought the projects looked dorky, lol. I just took the fondant one.

Do you mean that ribbon cutter thing with the different plates to put in? I think the waves aren't quite deep or big enough, but that's a good idea otherwise!

jules5000 Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 9:40pm
post #16 of 17

Yes, you have the right tool I couldn't remember the name of it.

I am new to this cake decorating business in that the only thing I have had in the way of learning is other people teaching me througha little mini class or through the wilton. I have learned a whole lot. I have actually been decorating cakes for about 30 years, but I never had any idea of how much I didn't know till I started taking the classes. The neat thing about the teachers I had was that they basically just told us that we were free to
make our final cake in whatever fashion we wanted as long as we showed at least one aspect of that course. we did not have to make the projects in that courses book for the final cake.

DianeLM Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 2:13pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Libberator3000

Yes! It helped very much! And thankyou for being so nice... I know we newbies probably ask the same dumb questions over and over, so I appreciate you taking the time to answer so thoughtfully!

I did use FondX, actually! I haven't seen anyone else talk about it yet! (but like you said...I need to browse the site more..hehe). I like the taste! And I used cornstarch, too!

My fondant was mostly good...but a few cracks on the upper edge...and on my bows. I waited until they were mostly dry but still pliable enough to stick them to the cake with vodka. Some of the curved edges got little cracks in them when I moved them.

About the cake spackle...why crumbs mixed in? That is what my bottom coat ends up looking like, anyway, by the time I'm done, but I thought I was trying to have less crumbs in my icing... Do I just do that with the thinned down crumb coat? Or...you mean with the top coat of frosting it seems like...

Thanks so much for the awesome tips! The freezing tip I will definitely try, and I will endeavor to have sharp corners like yours! And I will check out Sugershack's DVD as well!

I have to make a cake that looks like Machu Picchu this weekend. I'm floundering still on the design...this site and you awesome decorators are such a blessing!

Thanks so much!
Libby




Here are a few tips to help you avoid those cracked top edges:

Immediately after laying your fondant on the cake, smooth the top and the top edge. This will help the fondant stick to the top edge making it less likely to stretch and crack while you smooth the sides of the cake.

On a square cake, smooth the corners first, then smooth the sides.

When smoothing the fondant on the sides of the cake, move your smoother up and down - not side to side.

Cake Spackle - The difference between the spackle and just a regular crumb coat is the density of the spackle. It will create a firmer, smoother surface for your fondant than just plain, soft buttercream.

Yes, this is in place of the crumbcoat. Sometimes I nuke my spackle for a few seconds to make it easier to spread. Then, once it's on the partially frozen cake, it hardens nice and firm.

If the plain buttercream crumb coat works for you, then stick with it! Everyone has their favorite techniques. icon_smile.gif

Good luck with your Machu Picchu cake!

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