Cake Contracts For Sculpted Cakes?

Business By joy5678 Updated 4 Aug 2009 , 11:25am by FromScratch

joy5678 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 10:28pm
post #1 of 10

I haven't seen this addressed before and was wondering if anyone requires contracts for 3-D &/or sculpted cakes? If so, what kind of information do you suggest be included. Do you include a clause that releases you from any liabilities if you do not deliver the cake, etc.? Anything you share would be helpful. Thanks! icon_smile.gif

9 replies
JoJo0855 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 10:54pm
post #2 of 10

I'm just a hobbyist so don't know a thing about cake contracts, but if I was ever handed any contract (for anything) that had a clause stating the contractor would be liability free for non-delivery or non-performance, you can bet the farm that contract would go unsigned. Unless it had a clause that said if I wasn't 100% satisfied for any reason I would not have to pay.

__Jamie__ Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 10:55pm
post #3 of 10

Huh?? A clause specifying for whatever reason, if you don't deliver the cake, you're not liable for it? Or are you meaning if you don't deliver exact, spot on, drop dead accuracy? I hope that's what you meant. Even that is not cool though.

joy5678 Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 12:16am
post #4 of 10

Whoops! Sorry, should have made myself more clear icon_sad.gif What I mean is.....if a customer wants to pick up their cake instead of having it delivered, should there be a clause in the contract to state that I am not responsible for anything that might happen to the cake (like it falls over and breaks) if I do not deliver it. Does that make more sense??? And do you think a contract is even needed for a cake other than a wedding cake?

FromScratch Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 12:21am
post #5 of 10

Most definitely! icon_smile.gif I have a separate page for that... a release form that states that once the cake is placed in their car I am in no way responsible for what happens to it. I also send them an information page about how to properly transport a cake before hand and they must sign off that they recieved that paper and understand it.

__Jamie__ Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 12:42am
post #6 of 10

Ah, now I get it! Yes,no delivery from me=no guarantees. People drive like idiots, I mean they don't drive like we do when we're delivering. They just don't get it. And I do a contract for each and every cake without fail.

joy5678 Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 1:23am
post #7 of 10

Thank you for your info....I'm always worried when someone hits the road with a cake and this will make it alot easier for me. Contracts for all cakes? Even the small ones? I never even thought of that. I was thinking about the ones that were more subject to "topple" or cost more than say, $75?

3GCakes Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 1:44am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Ah, now I get it! Yes,no delivery from me=no guarantees. People drive like idiots, I mean they don't drive like we do when we're delivering. They just don't get it. And I do a contract for each and every cake without fail.




I almost hope they don't...because I always seem to be so excited to deliver a cake that I speed around corners, find every pothole, and drive in the "sunny lane'!!! I totally lose my driving skills when I deliver. icon_biggrin.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 1:52am
post #9 of 10

No, I still do one. I call it an order form when they aren't wedding cakes or really big orders (I don't know why I don't call them a contract, but I just realized I do that!!) But they are still a contract, and I'm bound to honor my agreement as much as they are, no matter what the size. icon_smile.gif

FromScratch Posted 4 Aug 2009 , 11:25am
post #10 of 10

I do a very detailed invoice for smaller orders. It has everything spelled out and they have to sign that the read it and agree to the terms. Weddings get my full contract and larger celebration orders do as well.

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