Why Does My Cake Circle Not Fit?

Decorating By angem4 Updated 3 Aug 2009 , 7:57pm by cherrycakes

angem4 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 2:52am
post #1 of 21

I have been having this problem since I started baking cakes and using Wilton cake pans and Wilton cake circles. I bake an 8" cake and use an 8" cake circle and the cake circles are always bigger then the cake. I don't get it. Why does that happen? Should I be using a 6" board for an 8" cake and so on. It doesn't matter what size I bake I always have the same problem. Any advice other than to cut the board down and have rough edges then?

20 replies
Sugarflowers Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 3:32am
post #2 of 21

All cakes shrink as they cool, usually about 1/4" in diameter. Trimming your boards ahead of time might help.

I use a matte cutter to make my own circles for cakes. Although they cut at a 45 degree angle, I can cut the cardboard any size I need. I set the cutter for 1/4" smaller than the pan size. I also buy carboard by the sheet for a fraction of the cost of pre-cut circles. The matte cutter is expensive but it pays for itself very quickly in supply costs. Using the coupon from Michael's will help with this.

HTH

Michele

Texas_Rose Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 3:38am
post #3 of 21

I use a box cutter to cut my own circles...the box cutter I got has a handle like a pocket knife so it's easy to use (plus it's purple icon_biggrin.gif which is always good). I usually trace the bottom of the pan and then cut the circle slightly inside the line.

sweetcakes Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 3:40am
post #4 of 21

umm!! have a matt cutter, have to get that out, where do you buy sheets of cake board Michelle?

PinkZiab Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 3:42am
post #5 of 21

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.

smbegg Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 3:55am
post #6 of 21

I usually use a smaller cake board than the pan size (ex-8 inch for 9 inch cake.)

Stephanie

chefjulie Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:01am
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.




Yeah, that! thumbs_up.gif

It also makes it way easier to move your layers, since the board comes to edge of the icing...

angem4 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:08am
post #8 of 21

Thanks for all the great ideas! I will have to look into a matte cutter.

Sugarflowers Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:15am
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcakes

umm!! have a matt cutter, have to get that out, where do you buy sheets of cake board Michelle?




Well... I used to get 3' x 4' sheets at a place called Budget, Box, and Bags when I lived in Oklahoma. It's been a little tougher here than I had hoped, but independent shipping stores will sometimes special order the sheets. I normally order ten at a time. These are usually single wall cardboard for less than $2 each. I can make a LOT of cake boards with this and even my own boxes.

Check box stores on your area to see if they have sheets or sometimes called flats. There might be a discount with a minimum order.

Michele

tonedna Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:18am
post #10 of 21

I use my kitchen Scissors...I usually cut after the crumbcoat.

Edna icon_smile.gif

luv2cook721 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:25am
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.




This is what I do too, always works perfectly and like someone else said it is easy to move/stack the layers. By the time you ice the cake and add a border the cake board is well hidden.

patticakesnc Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:26am
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.




Yep....me too. Makes a great rest for that bench scraper to get a good smooth side.

JaimeAnn Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:27am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefjulie

Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.



Yeah, that! thumbs_up.gif

It also makes it way easier to move your layers, since the board comes to edge of the icing...




Me three!

It is good frosting guide.

BREN28 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 1:28pm
post #14 of 21

i use to cut my boards also,but got tired of it. i do what PinkZiab does also,its so much easier!!!

zoraya Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 1:52pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.




ditto, if you have any board still showing, border usually will cover it up.

__Jamie__ Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 2:09pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.




Exactly! Even though I cut mine out of foam core, I always cut them slightly larger for this purpose.

__Jamie__ Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 2:12pm
post #17 of 21

And if you want a perfectly perfect no border showing at all, use a circle exactly the same size, and put the cake and that circle on top of a slightly larger circle, Bench crape against that one, pop it in fridge, when it's nice and chilled, pop the cake and it's original circle off of the larger one, and you have a perfectly borderless cake all on it's own.

SarahsSweets2006 Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 2:25pm
post #18 of 21

I put the cake on the board and then just use some scissors to cut the excess and then ice to the edge.

CakeandDazzle Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 4:17pm
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.


indydebi Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 7:53pm
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

I just frost the cake out to the edge of the board/circle... using the board as my guide to smooth it out with the bench scraper.


Ditto. I'm usually a bit ticked if the board ISN'T a big bigger than the cake.

cherrycakes Posted 3 Aug 2009 , 7:57pm
post #21 of 21

So if I am making my own cake boards, how much bigger should the board be?

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