12 X 18 Wasc Cake Sank In The Middle...do I Try Again?

Decorating By SueB Updated 11 Aug 2009 , 5:29am by in2cakes2

SueB Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 2:36am
post #1 of 16

I'm hoping someone has had this happen before. I made a 12 x 18 x 3 sheet cake tonight using the "original" WASC recipe. It took 20 cups of batter so I had to make 3 batches, baked it at 325 for 90 minutes, used 5 flower nails scattered in the middle to help with heat distribution and it sank and was doughy in the middle. I'm very frustrated because I use this recipe for my round and square cakes and have never had a problem with it. This was an expensive failure for me and am wondering if this recipe just doesn't work for larger cakes and if not can someone recommend a similar cake that won't sink. Thanks for any help you can give!

15 replies
jammjenks Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 2:43am
post #2 of 16

I don't know. I was going to suggest baking at 325 and using a flower nail, but you already did that. Maybe someone else will know.

SueB Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 2:00pm
post #3 of 16

Noone? Is the batter just too thick on the WASC to work well in a large sheet cake pan like that or is there something else I did wrong?

JanH Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 2:54pm
post #4 of 16

The Wilton cake preparation charts suggest baking a 12x18x3 for 85-90 minutes at 325F.

Since the WASC cakes are much denser than straight cake mix, I believe your cake fell because it was underbaked at 90 minutes.

HTH

P.S. I have 3" pans, but found it faster to bake two 2" layers since the 3" seem to take forever to bake.... (And the 3" can be more sensitive to changes in recipe size.)

kakeladi Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 4:20pm
post #5 of 16

I have not used 3" deep pans with my recipe.
I tend to agree w/JanH - it probably just was under baked. Do not rely on time alone for baking. Always test. Let your nose help you. When you can smell it all through the house and it is just starting to pull away from the sides it should be done.
Do you live at a high elevation? That definitely can effect baking lots.

SueB Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 4:26pm
post #6 of 16

I don't rely on time in the oven. I am constantly checking with a toothpick to see if it is done. This particular cake even sprung back when I tapped it with my finger. The edges were getting really dark and the toothpick came out clean so I assumed it was done. Oh well, I guess I will have to do two 2" layers.

JanH Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 11:04pm
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SueB

I don't rely on time in the oven. I am constantly checking with a toothpick to see if it is done.




Constantly opening the oven can significantly add to the baking time. So I definitely think it was underbaked at 90 mins.

I've found the WASC usually requires the maxium time recommended by Wilton, and then I start checking with a toothpick, smelling, checking sides..

And since I can't always remember, I mark up my recipes with how long it actually took, at what temp., by pan size so that next time it'll go easier and faster. icon_lol.gif

Ladiesofthehouse Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 11:26pm
post #8 of 16

Just a shot in the dark, but have you checked your oven temp? I always heard people say that and I just recently bought an oven thermometer and checked. My oven is off by 22 degrees! I bake continuously, so this is news to me and I will now have to figure out how to calibrate it back to accuracy.

I bake the WASC double recipe in a 12 x 18 x 2" pan all the time without any trouble, maybe the extra inch needs a boost in temp just a bit?

Sorry to hear about the wastage--I hate that!

Kerry_Kake Posted 1 Aug 2009 , 11:38pm
post #9 of 16

Yup, it was underbaked. It has happened to me before. I have the 11x15 pan and it takes over 60 min. baked at 300. And that's a 2" deep pan with 2 wasc recipes. I always wait until it fully springs back with the finger touch before taking it out. Because like Jan said the wasc recipe usually takes the max baking time.
I like to bake at 300 because I find I have a more consistent moistness throughout the cake....no dry edges icon_smile.gif

beachcakes Posted 2 Aug 2009 , 12:54am
post #10 of 16

My 12x18x2 takes two mixes with WASC and about 80 mins to cook at 325. I also don't go by the time. I agree yours might be a little underdone.
My oven does not cook evenly & I've had WASC cook up with a nice crust, thinking it's done and still be raw in the middle.

pmw Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:00am
post #11 of 16

I have problems baking homemade cakes in a 12x18 pan. So to solve the problem I bake two 9x13 and place them together with a small amount of frosting between them.
Make sure that you use the same amount of batter in each cake so that they will beeven. I also bake at 325.
I have a question? What is wasc? I am new and don't know the abbrevations.

JanH Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 1:38am
post #12 of 16

Hi and Welcome to CC, pmw. icon_smile.gif

Decoding CC acronyms:
(WASC = White Almond Sour Cream)

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-2926-.html

Everything you need to know to make, decorate and assemble tiered/stacked/layer cakes:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-605188-.html

Above superthread has popular CC recipes for crusting American buttercreams, several types of fondant and doctored cake mix (WASC and other flavor variations) - and so much more!

HTH

in2cakes2 Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 2:36am
post #13 of 16

I have found when baking a large WASC I have my oven at 315 and set the timer for 60 min and don't open the oven door until the timer goes off then check it by not opening the door but looking through the door window until it looks like it is starting to pull away from the sides of the pan. hth Good luck thumbs_up.gif

ATCakes Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 3:05am
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SueB

I'm hoping someone has had this happen before. I made a 12 x 18 x 3 sheet cake tonight using the "original" WASC recipe. It took 20 cups of batter so I had to make 3 batches, baked it at 325 for 90 minutes, used 5 flower nails scattered in the middle to help with heat distribution and it sank and was doughy in the middle. I'm very frustrated because I use this recipe for my round and square cakes and have never had a problem with it. This was an expensive failure for me and am wondering if this recipe just doesn't work for larger cakes and if not can someone recommend a similar cake that won't sink. Thanks for any help you can give!


I haven't made any 12 x 18 WASC, but I have made several 11 x 15s. I use the wilton core in the middle and cake strips aroung the outside and have had no problems. Maybe the flower nail isn't big enough for that size cake?

madgeowens Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 3:05am
post #15 of 16

That only happened to me once, when I over filled the cake pan...it was deep...and it was not baked thru...and poof it fell.....it was like one of those volcano cakes in the middle.......not good eats.....definately under done....also I use a core in center of larger cakes so it gets done in the center.....except the time I forgot....read above hehe

in2cakes2 Posted 11 Aug 2009 , 5:29am
post #16 of 16

Wow sorry for all the underlining icon_redface.gif

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