What Exactly Makes 'crusting Bc' Crust?

Decorating By CountryCakery4 Updated 31 Jul 2009 , 4:30pm by nadine_n

CountryCakery4 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 1:56pm
post #1 of 13

I've heard of 'crusting' BC as opposed to non but am wondering just what exactly it is that makes it do so? TIA icon_smile.gif

12 replies
jardot22 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:05pm
post #2 of 13

The crusting is dependent on how much powdered sugar is used in the recipe. The more powdered sugar, the more crusting. This is why meringue-based buttercreams dont' crust. They contain no powdered sugar. HTH icon_smile.gif

CountryCakery4 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:20pm
post #3 of 13

I thought that adding more PS just made your icing stiffer. Does this mean that if I made the icing a little thinner for piping accents that the accents wouldn't crust as well? Or do I need to thin a different way other than just not adding as much PS?

jardot22 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:25pm
post #4 of 13

The crusting depends on your ratio of powdered sugar to shortening, so if you just thin it with some milk/water, or whatever liquid you want to use, that still won't affect the sugar to shortening ratio, and it will crust the same.

jardot22 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:27pm
post #5 of 13

Let me also add, that i didn't mean shortening exclusively - i should have said "fat to powdered sugar ratio" Hope this isn't too confusing icon_smile.gif

CountryCakery4 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:33pm
post #6 of 13

Nope! Makes perfect sense to me. icon_biggrin.gif Thanks so much!! thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

Danielle1218 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 4:39pm
post #7 of 13

I always thought it had to do with the meringue powder that makes a buttercream/icing crust.

I know that I put extra meringue powder in black, blue and dark purple icings so that they don't bleed.

jardot22 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 5:15pm
post #8 of 13

Meringue powder acts as a stabilizer and can make the icing more fluffy, but it isn't what causes crusting.

kakeladi Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 5:39pm
post #9 of 13

.........thought it had to do with the meringue powder that makes a buttercream/icing crust......

Wilton started the use of meringue powder in icing to sell product! They want you to think it will make the icing crust so you will continue to use it.
As was said, it is how much fat to ps that makes it crust. MP will only very slightly help it crust but is more of a stabilizer than 'cruster' icon_smile.gif
The more fat used the less it will 'set-up/crust'.
As an example the usual amount of ps per recipe is 2#. Most recipes use 1 1/2 OR 2 cups of 'fat'. This will crust nicely.
I have a *really good* recipe that calls for 4 cups of fat (2C crisco and 2C butter along w/2#s of ps and 2 tablespoons flavoring - no other liquid). It is sooooo good but will never crust one bit even if one were to add meringue powder!

CountryCakery4 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 6:48pm
post #10 of 13

[quote="kakeladi"].
As an example the usual amount of ps per recipe is 2#. Most recipes use 1 1/2 OR 2 cups of 'fat'. This will crust nicely.


kakeladi, by 2# do you mean 2lbs (pounds)? I've never seen this short form before.

classiccake Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 12:33am
post #11 of 13

What makes icing crust is liquid and powdered sugar. The fat counteracts how much and how fast it will crust. But when you add liquid to PS, it always crusts.

momba5 Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 3:19am
post #12 of 13

kakeladi, would you post the recipe for your non crusting icing?

nadine_n Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 4:30pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi



Wilton started the use of meringue powder in icing to sell product! They want you to think it will make the icing crust so you will continue to use it.




Thanks! I've been wondering the same thing. I left it out of my last batch of BC and didn't notice a difference. I was concerned that maybe it wouldn't last as long or do as well in the heat or something without the meringue powder.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%