Cakes Are Sliding....what Am I Doing Wrong?

Decorating By Pebbles1727 Updated 8 Aug 2009 , 8:10pm by pattykayscakes

Pebbles1727 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:03pm
post #1 of 17

Please help, I had two cakes that slid in the past month and I need to figure out how to prevent it in the future. One cake was 6 inch and the other 10 inch. Both were picked up by customers and then driven by them for about 40 miles to final destination. On arrival both slid. I could not get too much more information than that.
Here is what I do:
I use the same size cake board as the cake. I put a good dollop of icing on the board and smear it to "glue" the cake to it. Ice it. I then use 1/4 sheet MDF exact size as the box (usually 2 inches bigger than a cake). MDF is wrapped in heavy contact paper/shelf liner. Then, I tape the cake board in the center with heavy packing tape.

Is there a better way? Am I doing it wrong? I cannot imagine how it slides, it seems so secure. It never happened to me personally and it did not happen to a tiered cake that was traveling with customer for 70 miles. So what's up with these then?
Please help, I really don't want them sliding all over the place, and cannot figure out anything else.
Thanks in advance, P

16 replies
Doug Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:15pm
post #2 of 17

who knows how they drove (if like I do normally, lucky it wouldn't be upside down and in pieces!)

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if you're doing the "roll" of tape trick -- of course it will slide.

better: double stick foam or carpet tape

better yet: hot melt glue.

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Q: why are you using MDF? that's expensive unless it's returned to you. Have you considered a double layer of cakeboards (glued together of course) or a cake drum?

http://www.globalsugarart.com/search.php?search=cake+drum&searchimage.x=0&searchimage.y=0

can put cake straight onto drum

Pebbles1727 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:33pm
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Quote:

Q: why are you using MDF? that's expensive unless it's returned to you. Have you considered a double layer of cakeboards (glued together of course) or a cake drum?




It's a 1/4 inch board, I buy it in a bigger sheet and get Lowe's to cut it in the right sizes. Ends up being 25-50 cents a board, it is much cheeper than cake drum. As for cake boards stacked together, they are not sturdy enough. It seems that people keep grabbing cake by the sides, mdf seems to prevent stupid damage. The last time I used stacked/glued boards together, I watched a lady squish cake between her arm and her tummy while she was looking for her money with the other hand. icon_cry.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 7:03pm
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

I watched a lady squish cake between her arm and her tummy while she was looking for her money with the other hand. icon_cry.gif




OMG! tapedshut.gifthumbsdown.gif

Doug Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 7:24pm
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pebbles1727

The last time I used stacked/glued boards together, I watched a lady squish cake between her arm and her tummy while she was looking for her money with the other hand. icon_cry.gif




that's a cake heathen!

don't you wish sometimes you could grab the cake back and tell them: "NO cake for you!"

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 7:31pm
post #6 of 17

I would Doug....I seriously would gasp and grab for it, and probably send them packing with a full refund. icon_biggrin.gif

tiggy2 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 8:10pm
post #7 of 17

Some people shouldn't be allowed to reproduce! Were they single tier cakes or multi tiered? Who knows how the cakes were handled once they left you.

Pebbles1727 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 8:26pm
post #8 of 17
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Were they single tier cakes or multi tiered?




That's the thing--the cakes that slid were single tiers. I had two-tiered cakes travel that distance or further (same way secured) and nothing slid anywhere. That's why I'm confused. I just need to make sure the assembly is dummy-proof.

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I seriously would gasp and grab for it




I did. The thing was I just finished telling her to hold the cake from the bottom and then she does that-the sides of the box just caved it as they were made from tissuer paper. Oh well, leave and learn...

xstitcher Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 10:06pm
post #9 of 17

Did the box slide or the cake? Ask them to drive like they have a baby on board and use shelf liner (or something that will help prevent cake box from moving) under the box. Also have them put the box on a level surface. Like the floor not the seat.


shelf liner:
http://www.stacksandstacks.com/shelf-liner-grip-it/?id=176&sku=10338&utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase

Deb_ Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 11:00pm
post #10 of 17

When you say the cakes slid, did the top layer slide off the bottom layer? or The entire cake slid in the box?

If it's the first scenario I mentioned, could it be the type and amount of filling that was used?

If it's the latter scenario...sounds like they drove like maniacs.

Pebbles1727 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 11:24pm
post #11 of 17
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When you say the cakes slid, did the top layer slide off the bottom layer? or The entire cake slid in the box?




The whole cake slid within the box. I don't know if it slid of the cake board or if it slid with the cake board-people were not very specific. That's why I'm trying to figure out if my assembly is different than anyone else's. It hadn't happen to me personally or anyone else with my cakes, except for these two, even though nothing has changged in a way I secure the cakes. One of the cakes was with sugarshack's buttercream as filling and another with a pretty stiff cream cheese filling (earlene's recipe). The amount of fillings were the same as with any other cakes I've done- only to the level of the dam, no more.
Any ideas?

Deb_ Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 12:46am
post #12 of 17

I pretty much assemble as you do except instead of taping the board holding the cake, onto the "display board" I glue it with either an Elmer's glue stick or regular Elmer's School Glue.


I don't think it had anything to do with how you did it, I think they just didn't drive carefully.

We're pro's at taking corners slowly, avoiding bumps and pot-holes, etc., but the average person just doesn't understand it.

They may have left the cakes in the sun or their car may not have been cool enough....so many things could have caused the cakes to slide, but I think it was their fault not yours.

Pebbles1727 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:05am
post #13 of 17

thanks you all, I will go ahead and sub the tape with glue in the future and see if I have any more slides.
Thanks a bunch, P

TexasSugar Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 6:04am
post #14 of 17

Did they place the cakes on the seat? Alot of times the surfaces in our cars are not flat, even floor boards can often have some tilt to them. A cake sitting on any tilted surface, even a small tilt can slide, especially after 40 miles.

Cookie45 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:10pm
post #15 of 17

I always make sure that the box or container the cake is in is also surrounded by enough "stuff" that it won't move. I keep collapsable boxes in my car for just that purpose. I also make sure that if there is any space between the cake plate and box it's in has something (ie, cardboard) to wedge it so there is no movement with the box.

I also agree that people don't always drive as if they are carrying precious cargo. I remind them of this before they drive away.

Pebbles1727 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:36pm
post #16 of 17

Thank you all. I don't know how they actually carried it. I have told both before they left that it cannot be in the trunk, it needs to be set on the flat sirface and in the airconditioning. I don't really know how it was actually carried. Both were going to the beach for a few days with family and friends so I imagine they had luggage and such with them, so it's possible that cakes were not transported properly. I just needed to know if my set up was off, since I never asked how to do it, I just assumed it went that way. What I gathered is that others do same or similar as I do, so there is barely anything I can troubleshoot. I will replace tape with glue and go from there.
Thanks again, P

pattykayscakes Posted 8 Aug 2009 , 8:10pm
post #17 of 17

I almost always deliver my cakes and I travel quite some distance with only a few minor sliding issues after I first started. If someone does pick up a cake or meet me to pick it up, I always say, "Please remember that a cake doesn't move with the curves like people do. Please take it easy on the curves!" I haven't had anyone call to say the cake slid because even if it did, after me telling them this, they would probably be embarrassed and/or assume then it was their fault because after a sturdy, well-put-together cake leaves my possession, it's no longer my problem.

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