How Can You Make A Pattern Press For Buttercream ...?

Decorating By LittleLinda Updated 31 Jul 2009 , 3:24am by TexasSugar

LittleLinda Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 2:00pm
post #1 of 25

I want to do repetative scroll work around a wedding cake. I'd like to press on a guideline first.

24 replies
ninatat Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 2:20pm
post #2 of 25

you might be able to make mold out of 50/50 gumpaste/fondant, someone posted she makes her own molds, i have to look it up i couldn't find the puddy clay, but i'm using something called paper clay. or you could use the transfer method with piping gel

drakegore Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:54pm
post #3 of 25

hi linda,
is this what you were thinking of?:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-609974-puffy.html+paint

i live up the road from you in newburyport!

diane

LittleLinda Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 8:56pm
post #4 of 25

Hi Nina, it's not a mold I want to make ... maybe the piping gel method will do it.

Diane, I get what she was saying in the tutorial. It's a good idea; but I'm not sure I could press it over and over. .... You live in Newburyport? Cool!

LittleLinda Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 8:58pm
post #5 of 25

Hi Nina, it's not a mold I want to make ... maybe the piping gel method will do it.

Diane, I get what she was saying in the tutorial. It's a good idea; but I'm not sure I could press it over and over. .... You live in Newburyport? Cool!

LittleLinda Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 9:00pm
post #6 of 25

Hi Nina, it's not a mold I want to make ... maybe the piping gel method will do it.

Diane, I get what she was saying in the tutorial. It's a good idea; but I'm not sure I could press it over and over. .... You live in Newburyport? Cool!

ninatat Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 9:07pm
post #7 of 25

Wow than idea with the royal icing i really cool

Bakingangel Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 6:30am
post #8 of 25

LL - Another method is to make a pattern on cardstock. Here's how:

Need: a piece of styroform
card stock paper (cheap at Sam's)
sewing straight pin (used for hemming) with a plastic ball on one
end (to push on)


1. Copy or trace your pattern onto a piece of card stock paper.

2. Put the paper on top of the styrofoam.

3. Using a pin trace the pattern by pushing the pin through the paper.
This will create a line of tiny pinholes.

4. The back side of the card stock will have a rough pattern design, sorta
like braille.

5. Lay the cardstock against the crusted butter cream or fondant
and gently rub over the design. Carefully lift away and you'll have
the dotted pattern to trace over with your icing tip.

Option: laminate the card stock first, then punch out the pattern. That way you'll be able to keep the pattern for a long time.

Texas_Rose Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 7:46am
post #9 of 25

What about using an acrylic stamp once the buttercream has crusted well? I use them on fondant but it should work on buttercream too.

There's also those things that Wilton makes, if one was the design you wanted to do: http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E30D882-475A-BAC0-5D0833D2D8DFB041

Kiki74 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 11:33am
post #10 of 25

I was just reading another thread on here that talks about using RI to make a pattern you can press onto your cake.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-609974.html

HTH

LittleLinda Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 12:25pm
post #11 of 25

Kiki74: drakegore sent me the same thread! Thank you.
Texas_Rose: I have those pattern presses you suggested. The bride, however, chose a specific pattern out of one of my Wilton books.
Bakingangel: I used the pin prick method back in 1982! It was a much more elaborate design and took so long to prick the pattern! I do think I would consider using it again for smaller patterns such as what I'm planning for this cake.
I'm also coming up with my own idea. What do you guys think of this?
I was thinking of making a long strip of paper as long and wide as the cake. I was thinking of marking off the paper in even segments and drawing the pattern on one segment and tracing the exact thing on each segment ... that way, it would be evenly spaced out as well. I could use piping gel to trace the whole thing, wrap it around the cake, and pull it off and have the whole pattern on the cake in piping gel for me to trace.

drakegore Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 12:54pm
post #12 of 25

i would love to know how that works for you! please let us know.
i am struggling with this too because my freehand is not any better than my six year olds, in fact i think his is better icon_smile.gif.

diane

jdelaney81 Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:39pm
post #13 of 25

If you want an imprint...Let the piping gel dry completely before pressing onto the sides. I found this out quite by accident, but it worked great.

txnonnie Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:58pm
post #14 of 25

You could print your pattern, mold floral wire to the pattern, leave handles at the ends of wire, then imprint your cake.

rosamatsas Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:03pm
post #15 of 25

so here is an idea that just sparked from reading your post. Not completely thought through but i think it would work. Instead of using royal icing what about using a hot glue gun to draw out the pattern. Obviously if there is a lot of fine detail that won't come out. But for a general pattern, this might be an adequate solution. You can also build up the pattern to make a deeper impression.
I've done this to make recessed dots in cakes to make my own dots stay better but never for a pattern.
And to make it 'flexible' i would use a very fine cheesecloth like material instead of a spastic sheet. that way you can wrap it around your cake.
just an idea.
good luck let us know how it turns out.

rosamatsas Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:09pm
post #16 of 25

so here is an idea that just sparked from reading your post. Not completely thought through but i think it would work. Instead of using royal icing what about using a hot glue gun to draw out the pattern. Obviously if there is a lot of fine detail that won't come out. But for a general pattern, this might be an adequate solution. You can also build up the pattern to make a deeper impression.
I've done this to make recessed dots in cakes to make my own dots stay better but never for a pattern.
And to make it 'flexible' i would use a very fine cheesecloth like material instead of a spastic sheet. that way you can wrap it around your cake.
just an idea.
good luck let us know how it turns out.

ddaigle Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 3:37pm
post #17 of 25

Wilton makes some press kits that have scrolls in them. I have pressed the s-scroll all around my cake because I'm always afraid I will not make them the same size. One set of their press kits are all teal and the other set are all purple. I have both, but believe the purple ones have the scrolls. I bought them at my local party supply store. You can google them to fine them elsewhere. HTH.

Melchas Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 4:04pm
post #18 of 25

I use craft wire bent to what ever shape I want. You'll only have to bend it once and it will hold it's shape, then just trace over the impression. HTH

rosamatsas Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 4:10pm
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melchas

I use craft wire bent to what ever shape I want. You'll only have to bend it once and it will hold it's shape, then just trace over the impression. HTH




great idea! i make my own cookie cutter but i never though of making a shape out of craft wire. Awsome

divaessence Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 4:19pm
post #20 of 25

You all blow my mind! Thanks for the great ideas!

bubblywhitewine Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 6:02pm
post #21 of 25

Ditto. I have learned so much from everyone here on CC. Thank you all for sharing your skills!

bubblywhitewine Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 6:03pm
post #22 of 25

Ditto. I have learned so much from everyone here on CC. Thank you all for sharing your skills!

dogtagsndiaperbags Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 11:07pm
post #23 of 25

You could also trace your design with 3D fabric paint, it would leave a nice imprint.

drakegore Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 11:11pm
post #24 of 25

has anyone actually tried it with the puffy paint?
can you get a fine line with it?
diane

TexasSugar Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 3:24am
post #25 of 25

I recently wanted to do some pipings on cakes but I suck at free handing things. I laid a piece of glass (from a picture frame) over the pattern and piped in royal icing on the glass (you could also use plexiglass). I was then able to take the glass and press it into soft fondant to leave the pattern behind for me to pipe over later. I don't see why you couldn't do that for buttercream as well. What I liked about the glass what I could see exactly where I was playing the pattern and I kept the edge flat on the counter so I didn't have to worry about things being uneven around the cake.

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