Twilight Cake: How To Make The Flower?

Decorating By agentdorkfish Updated 23 Jun 2010 , 2:36am by AimeeTheCakeLady

agentdorkfish Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:20pm
post #1 of 37

I'm going to make a Twilight cake for my cousin's birthday. I plan on using all the books' covers in the cake. I have everything basically figured out except for New Moon. I'm not sure how I'm going to do the flower.

This is a picture of the cover, for those not familar with the Twilight saga

I'm sure it would be simple for a professional, but I'm far from that! My skills are pretty limited. I have no experience with fondant or gumpaste. Any ideas for a somewhat simple method?

36 replies
iluvjay829 Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:35pm
post #2 of 37

What about a frozen butter cream transfer?

agentdorkfish Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:41pm
post #3 of 37

And that's something I have done, and basically was successful with it. I really wish I knew how to use fondant, because I could probably get a better detail that way.

Thanks for the reply!

azeboi2005 Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 3:01pm
post #4 of 37

Wilton has a flower cutter set, you could get it and in the book there are instructions how to make a tulip. Follow those and make a white gum paste tulip, but frill the edges with a toothpick (like really frill them), have it dry upside down on an egg carton with cotton balls underneath as to really open it up, and finally paint the red on it with some regular paste color mixed with vodka to make an edible paint. Allow everything to dry and then you could add a stem of wires covered in green gum paste and let that dry and adhere to the dried tulip.

azeboi2005 Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 3:04pm
post #5 of 37

Wilton has a flower cutter set, you could get it and in the book there are instructions how to make a tulip. Follow those and make a white gum paste tulip, but frill the edges with a toothpick (like really frill them), have it dry upside down on an egg carton with cotton balls underneath as to really open it up, and finally paint the red on it with some regular paste color mixed with vodka to make an edible paint. Allow everything to dry and then you could add a stem of wires covered in green gum paste and let that dry and adhere to the dried tulip.

susanscakecreations Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:52pm
post #6 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by azeboi2005

Wilton has a flower cutter set, you could get it and in the book there are instructions how to make a tulip. Follow those and make a white gum paste tulip, but frill the edges with a toothpick (like really frill them), have it dry upside down on an egg carton with cotton balls underneath as to really open it up, and finally paint the red on it with some regular paste color mixed with vodka to make an edible paint. Allow everything to dry and then you could add a stem of wires covered in green gum paste and let that dry and adhere to the dried tulip.




THAT ^^^^ would be GORGEOUS!!!!!!

jlynnw Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:52pm
post #7 of 37

Like she said. I did that for my flower and it worked great. Looking for a pic. Instead of trying to wire them, I made a tear drop shape out of fondant and glued the petals on to that (quarter size fondant to 1/4 cup water, microwave for 30 seconds stir, and again until it is liquid like egg whites). You can also do the petals alone scattered on the cake. I also dried the petals over a small round dish and an upturned cereal bowl.

playingwithsugar Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 6:25pm
post #8 of 37

That's a parrot tulip - I love them. Not my fave flower, but of tulips, one of my faves for sure.

Please do it in 3-D, and show us when it's done. Tulips are easy, so I don't forsee you having any problem.

Use airbrush color with a fine brush to paint the tips of the flower.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

mjpbmf Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 6:49pm
post #9 of 37

agentdorkfish don't hesitate or be afraid to use fondant/gumpaste. Sugar is a great medium to work with and somewhat forgiveable. Good luck and can't wait to see what you come up with!

mjpbmf Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 6:50pm
post #10 of 37

agentdorkfish don't hesitate or be afraid to use fondant/gumpaste. Sugar is a great medium to work with and somewhat forgiveable. Good luck and can't wait to see what you come up with!

Misdawn Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 6:59pm
post #11 of 37

You could also take two little blobs of fondant and knead them together a sligth bit so you get more of the marbled effect of the red with white. Don't knead too much though or you'll start to get a pink color mixed up in it.

mjballinger Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 7:53pm
post #12 of 37
tonedna Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 8:17pm
post #13 of 37

I would use a tulip mold and break the edges of it so it fearhers and curls..
Edna icon_smile.gif

LoriMc Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 8:42pm
post #14 of 37

I made these New Moon tulips without any flower making supplies. I had never made a flower before, so I got a silk parrot tulip and took one of the petals off. I used the petal as an outline as I cut the fondant out with a pastry roller. I used the wavy edge of my pastry roller to help with the frilled edges, but you could also use a toothpick. Basically I let it dry and harden (I added tylose powder to the fondant, but you could just buy gumpaste instead) then colored it with some powdered red food coloring. I tried my regular americolor gels mixed with gin but it didn't look good that way. Just roll out a yellow colored cone for the center. I didn't even wire this flower together. I just placed the petals in the buttercream, so that they were arranged like a flower.

Two other suggestions are to 1) Buy a fake parrot tulip at your local Michael's or Hobby Lobby and just use it on the cake. Paint it with food coloring if you need to add red, OR

2) If you have ever used candy melts you could try melting some white candy onto a fake petal of a parrot tulip then pulling the petal off when it has hardened. You can then color it with food color. I have seen people do this technique with silk leaves. I'll post an example of a picture I have seen on here.

For some reason it is not letting me post picture attachments at the moment so here are the links to the pictures.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1358808.html

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=84440

tonedna Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 10:27pm
post #15 of 37

I would use a Tulip or maybe a featherr veiner and break the edges like in a carnation. Is like ruffling them and pulling a little bit maybe a more pointy tool. Is not an easy flower to make for a beginer. It need to be let dry maybe in like an egg candy mold shape. Each petal should have it's own wire. The flower is handpainted and then lightly dusted
I hope you understand, is not easily explain in writing.
Edna icon_smile.gif

LoriMc Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 11:16pm
post #16 of 37

I think part of the problem might be that she doesn't have flower making tools like veiners and stuff. I know it's hard because I had to do it myself. I ended up buying the wilton flower kit after realizing how many Twilight cakes I would be making!

LoriMc Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 11:18pm
post #17 of 37

I think part of the problem might be that she doesn't have flower making tools like veiners and stuff. I know it's hard because I had to do it myself and people kept telling me all these flower tools to use. I had no idea what they were talking about.

I actually ended up buying the wilton flower kit after realizing how many Twilight cakes I would be making!

LoriMc Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 11:18pm
post #18 of 37

I think part of the problem might be that she doesn't have flower making tools like veiners and stuff. I know it's hard because I had to do it myself and people kept telling me all these flower tools to use. I had no idea what they were talking about.

I actually ended up buying the wilton flower kit after realizing how many Twilight cakes I would be making!

agentdorkfish Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 1:24am
post #19 of 37

LoriMC, you are exactly right. I don't have anything at all to make flowers! I've got a few ideas that I'm going to try. Who knows if it'll work.. There's only one way to find out! I'm just going to play around. I still have plenty of time before I need to make the cake.

And I really appreciate all the replies!

BeckySue Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:31am
post #20 of 37

I made a (gumpaste) flower for the first time with my Twilight cake. I mixed gumpaste (pre-packaged ready made) with MMF. (50/50) I made 6 petals, individually; just rolled out the MMF mixture cut out a shape (with a round cookie cutter) and then molded and pulled and cut the edges with a little knife and left it to dry in an egg carton. Then when the petals were completely dry, I painted the edges and stuck them together with more MMF/gumpaste. It took some trial and error (I got some REALLY ugly flowers) but I was happy with the final result. You don't need a flower making kit, just a little time and patience icon_smile.gif Good luck!!

Here is a picture of my flower if you want to take a look:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1336731

BeckySue Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:31am
post #21 of 37

thumbs_up.gif

Berecca Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:44am
post #22 of 37

I just used the Wilton tulip cutter and letter it dry on my small rolling pin that I stood up in a cup. Then I painted the edges with some gel dye and almond extract (any sort of extract with alcohol will work, though). I actually took it off the rolling pin when it was still a little soft and it fell nicely into the shape you see in the picture below. Then, I rolled out a little snake of black gum paste for the stem.

Here's my cake:
  http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1335943.html

Hope that helps!

Berecca Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 4:44am
post #23 of 37

I just used the Wilton tulip cutter and let it dry on my small rolling pin that I stood up in a cup. Then I painted the edges with some gel dye and almond extract (any sort of extract with alcohol will work, though). I actually took it off the rolling pin when it was still a little soft and it fell nicely into the shape you see in the picture below. Then, I rolled out a little snake of black gum paste for the stem.

Here's my cake:
  http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1335943.html

Hope that helps!

alwaysbridal Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 5:41am
post #24 of 37

You could also go to your local market and have an edible picture printed on rice paper? I know thats not as good as 3d flower but you can get great color and I think its easy to use

chocolatestone Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:36am
post #25 of 37

I have never made any fondant flowers but would like to make the cake when New Moon premiers later this year. I thought about how I would attempt it and instead of doing a whole flower I would just do the petals cause it will be a lot less stressed.

Like the others said I was planning to cut out the shape of the petal, place it on a sponge and feather it with a toothpick. Leave it to dry and then brush it with red luster dust on the ends of the petals.

Well I hope it works out and I'm glad you started this thread cause it something I could reference when making my cake later this year. icon_smile.gif

chocolatestone Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:38am
post #26 of 37

I have never made any fondant flowers but would like to make the cake when New Moon premiers later this year. I thought about how I would attempt it and instead of doing a whole flower I would just do the petals cause it will be a lot less stressed.

Like the others said I was planning to cut out the shape of the petal, place it on a sponge and feather it with a toothpick. Leave it to dry and then brush it with red luster dust on the ends of the petals.

Well I hope it works out and I'm glad you started this thread cause it something I could reference when making my cake later this year. icon_smile.gif

jannanners Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 9:06am
post #27 of 37

I normally favour fondant or gumapste for flowers, I like to do everything as realistic as possible, but when I made a twilight cake I ended up using the "brushed embroidery" technique for the new Moon tulip. I already have 2 other orders for a twilight cake, and might take those opportunities to try other techniques.
Even though it wasn't 3D I was very happy with my end result and I thought that it matched the book cover pretty well. Brushed embroidery is very simple to do. I did the white first, and piped the basic shape of the tulip and pulled the icing into the cntre using a paint brush, then I mixed a small amount of icing with lots of red food colouring and painted the tips red.
Here's the link if you'd like to take a look. it might be somethign easier to try if you don't have the tools for gumpaste flowers icon_biggrin.gif good luck!

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1334153.html

LoriMc Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 1:27pm
post #28 of 37

My question is, when New Moon comes out how are we gonna start making fondant werewolves!!!!

agentdorkfish Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 1:32pm
post #29 of 37

jannanners, that looks great! And me being a rookie at the cake stuff, I think that's the route I need to go! Thank you!

And thank you for everyone who replied! After I have more practice, I'll try some other methods!

Marianna46 Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 3:24pm
post #30 of 37

LoriMc, you can make anything out of fondant. I think we should probably start on it right now icon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gif. Agentdorkfish, I wish you the best of luck, whatever you try (and you get my vote for the best screen name on this site). I truly LOVE working with fondant and gumpaste, and I'd like to encourage you to get into these things. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is and how spectacular the results can be. On the other hand, this might not be the time, if you have this cake coming up. I agree with you about taking jannanners suggestion to use brush embroidery. Her flower was spectacular! I'm going to try it, too, because I need to make some hibiscus for a tropical cake I have coming up, and it seems like her technique would lend itself to those petals, too (thanks so much, jannanners, for sending that photo in thumbs_up.gificon_cool.gificon_surprised.gif ).

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