New Wedding Cake Delivery Box- Amazing!

Decorating By Gingoodies Updated 29 Jul 2009 , 6:36pm by Doug

Gingoodies Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:25pm
post #1 of 11

Thanks for posting this. Very interesting concept, but a bit pricey. Glad it works for you.

10 replies
indydebi Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:41pm
post #2 of 11

Well, it looked interesting until I saw the price. icon_surprised.gif

I recently did a cake decorating demo and ran a wooden dowel down the center of the cake. I then tipped the cake more than 45 degrees to show how it holds and how it's pretty stable for transporting.

That dowel rod didn't cost me no $500. icon_eek.gif

I've seen leahs say she's done the same with the SPS system. And it doesnt' cost $500.

jsmith Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:41pm
post #3 of 11

That looks fantastic. I think I'll save my money up for that. The only thing I'm worried about is the weight of the box. Wedding cakes are already heavy enough without adding an extra 20 lbs. Does the steel rod have a point so it goes through the cardboards easily?

txnonnie Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 3:07pm
post #4 of 11

Wow this looks nice, but costly. I have always used a dowel rod through the cake and no box and that seems to work just fine....much less expensive...no worries about getting the pieces back.

This would be something I would let my son or son-in-law look at to build replica for me and not purchase. I do like the box around the cake.

cylstrial Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 2:47am
post #5 of 11

Holy crap! They do look awesome...but they just start at $450 and go up from there!

cylstrial Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 12:24pm
post #6 of 11

I could handle it if I just needed one...but when you start making lots and lots and lots of cakes. You would have to buy lots of those boxes.

But you know, I'm really glad that I found this thread and saw the box. Because I do think that it's really neat!

And who knows...maybe one day I can justif the expense.

indydebi Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 12:43pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

I could handle it if I just needed one...but when you start making lots and lots and lots of cakes. You would have to buy lots of those boxes.



Good point. I have 3 cakes to deliver on Sat. At $500 each, that's $1500 worth of boxes.

I'm too scared to figure out how many cookies I'd have to sell to PROFIT $1500 to come up with the extra cash for this kind of purchase.

I'm also not sure if it's reasonable to put a $350 cake (cake for 100 @ $3.50/serving) inside a $500 carrying case.

Doug Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 1:26pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

I could handle it if I just needed one...but when you start making lots and lots and lots of cakes. You would have to buy lots of those boxes.


Good point. I have 3 cakes to deliver on Sat. At $500 each, that's $1500 worth of boxes.

I'm too scared to figure out how many cookies I'd have to sell to PROFIT $1500 to come up with the extra cash for this kind of purchase.

I'm also not sure if it's reasonable to put a $350 cake (cake for 100 @ $3.50/serving) inside a $500 carrying case.




and the question arises: just how long will one box last? 1 year? 2 years? 5 years?

knowing that and how many cakes it would transport over those years, you could then amortize the cost of the box across the cakes. (BTW: does anyone know the IRS rate at which cake equipment can be amortized? is it the same 5 years as most business equipment? This is important as it lets you take the cost of the equipment off your taxes on a pro rated basis over a set number of years)

so, using FICTIONAL numbers to create an example:

lets say I can get 3 years out of one of those boxes. And let's say that I can use any box once a week -- so that's 156 uses in 3 years

or about $3/use for the box costing $450. not too bad.

I could upsell the use of the box -- it is NOT a standard part of the delivery.

"Would you like to buy added insurance? $5 (i'm going to build in PROFIT!)

or not upsell and just add it in automatically and promote the heck out of my exclusive cake safe delivery technique. (insert some platitudinous tag line here)

of course if I can get more than one use a week or more than 3 years out of the box, then the costs drop correspondingly and my profit goes up as well.

__________________________________________________

HOWEVER -- I'm with the person who said make your own.

it appears to be made of double wall lexan (often used for greenhouses and available anywhere that sells supplies for making greenhouses or covered pergolas)

here for good pic: http://www.ridoutplastics.com/lexan-thermoclear.html

then held together with some type of loose-pin hinge system (like hinges on a door, but the pin fits in just loosely enough that it is easily removed, but still holds things tight -- an old theatre trick for easily collapsible, yet sturdy, sets. Other fancier fasteners available, but this is super cheap -- make it yourself out any old hinges)

base is (guessing) wood. top more of the plastic. holes aligned to and bottom by stacking top on bottom and drilling at same time.

could grove the base for the panels to sit in or attach metal U-channel for same purpose.

any skilled wood worker could construct one fairly easily.

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so a 4x8 sheet of 3/4" plywood would yield at least 4 if not more bases

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the lexan panel, about $70 for 1 - 4x8 sheet enough for one box.

http://www.eplastics.com/Plastic/Lexan_Thermoclear_Polycarbonate_Multiwall_Sheet

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and the wooden knob on top is just a mushroom knob:

http://hardware.hardwarestore.com/74-466-wood-cabinet-knobs/2-x-3-4-plain-round-hardwood-knob-610463.aspx

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steel rod available at any hardware store.

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the metal 3-prong T-nut needed on base for rod to screw into: (well, i'd use one just be to be extra safe)

http://www.selbyhardware.com/k9.htm (first image)

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So home made could do for about $100.

PinkZiab Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 2:44pm
post #9 of 11

I just don't see the appeal of this product.

#1 My cakes are already doweled through the center (and I dowel in such a way that there is NO visible hole on the top tier of the cake, allowing for designs with no cake topper--this "safe" would ruin the top of my cake).

#2 When necessary, I deliver in cardboard shipping boxes. Cheap as chips and I've NEVER had a cake disaster.

#3 I've never had to drive overly-carefully. I drive normally without much thought. Driving around with fully-assembled cakes is sort of second nature at this point.

It's a novel idea, but it's really not cost-effective, ESPECIALLY (as Debi pointed out) for anyone who has to deliver more than one cake at a time.

I'll pass icon_smile.gif

cylstrial Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:21pm
post #10 of 11

Doug - you are very good at thinking things thru and helping the rest of us do the same. You never cease to amaze me!

Doug Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 6:36pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Doug - you are very good at thinking things thru and helping the rest of us do the same. You never cease to amaze me!




LOL

it's a techi theatre thing.

I think theatre folk invented the concept of:

I want it to look like a MILLION bucks! And your budget is $100.



corollary: we have done so much with so little for so long, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!

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