Anybody Own A Faux Cake Rental Business...please Help!!!!

Business By caketease Updated 6 Aug 2009 , 5:28am by sara91

caketease Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 1:44am
post #1 of 18

Ok, I am really interested in starting a faux cake rental business, but I have no clue where to start. icon_confused.gif I know that I will need the styrofoam cakes, some type of faux icing to cover them, some type of coloring to color the faux icing, but thats all that I know. icon_redface.gif What is the process for creating and assembling them in order to rent them? I am really in need of advise. I lost my job back in April and really need to make some extra money in order to make ends meet.

Thanks everybody.

17 replies
ScarletsCakes Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 2:13am
post #2 of 18

I'm so sorry to hear about your job loss, we are going through a similar situation and it suuuuucks!

Check out this web site:
http://eleganzacakes.web.officelive.com/default.aspx

This nice lady is in Canada and she was very helpful and personally e-mailed me responses to questions I had about her completely faux cake biz. It was very interesting though would definitely take a small investment to get going with something like that. I'd imagine you wouldn't need a kitchen license for something like that so all those fees, permits and red tape wouldn't be a factor.

Hope this helps a little.

caketease Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 2:38am
post #3 of 18

Thanks for repsonding. She does awesome work. A couple of months back, I did see a website that showed now to create the faux cakes step by step but I did not save it in my favorites so of course I ame not able to find it now. CRAPPPPPPP icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif

Thanks again.

Sox-n-Pats Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 6:26am
post #4 of 18

do a Google search for "making fzux cakes" I got 10 that came up- including how to make the faux icing.

good luck with your business venture

Carolynlovescake Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 6:50pm
post #5 of 18

Remember this:

CHARGE WHAT YOU ARE WORTH AND WHAT THEY ARE WORTH

Do not under cut prices just because it's a fake cake.

My display/faux cakes cost more than a real cake because the foams, and supplies for them add up quickly.

dsilvest Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 7:38pm
post #6 of 18

CarolynGwen

I would agree with you if my cakes were only going out once. They will go out multiple times and are changed to suit the need of the brides. They are not worn or dirty. Each cake goes out looking like it was the first time.

I make my money after they have gone out once. Most of the styles are simple and do not take a lot of time. The cakes in my gallery that are more elaborate are the result of me teaching myself a new technique or trying out a new toy. I have only been doing this a year so I have had to learn a lot. My first paying cake went out June 08. I am now getting inquiries from across the US, Canada and now Europe. I must be doing something right.


If I charge the same as a real cake then brides will just get the real thing and I will not get any rentals. Why would I do this to myself?

I find that some CCers are very negative faux cakers. I enjoy the creative part, not the baking part, that is why I only make faux cakes.

Diane
Eleganza Cakes

Mike1394 Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 7:45pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilvest

CarolynGwen

I would agree with you if my cakes were only going out once. They will go out multiple times and are changed to suit the need of the brides. They are not worn or dirty. Each cake goes out looking like it was the first time.

I make my money after they have gone out once. Most of the styles are simple and do not take a lot of time. The cakes in my gallery that are more elaborate are the result of me teaching myself a new technique or trying out a new toy. I have only been doing this a year so I have had to learn a lot. My first paying cake went out June 08. I am now getting inquiries from across the US, Canada and now Europe. I must be doing something right.


If I charge the same as a real cake then brides will just get the real thing and I will not get any rentals. Why would I do this to myself?

I find that some CCers are very negative faux cakers. I enjoy the creative part, not the baking part, that is why I only make faux cakes.

Diane
Eleganza Cakes




Diane, very lovely work.

Mike

Carolynlovescake Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 8:24pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilvest

CarolynGwen

I would agree with you if my cakes were only going out once. They will go out multiple times and are changed to suit the need of the brides. They are not worn or dirty. Each cake goes out looking like it was the first time.

I make my money after they have gone out once. Most of the styles are simple and do not take a lot of time. The cakes in my gallery that are more elaborate are the result of me teaching myself a new technique or trying out a new toy. I have only been doing this a year so I have had to learn a lot. My first paying cake went out June 08. I am now getting inquiries from across the US, Canada and now Europe. I must be doing something right.


If I charge the same as a real cake then brides will just get the real thing and I will not get any rentals. Why would I do this to myself?

I find that some CCers are very negative faux cakers. I enjoy the creative part, not the baking part, that is why I only make faux cakes.

Diane
Eleganza Cakes




Diane,

My thoughts on my post were more along the lines of brides who are going to want to bargain the price with "well the article I read/saw on/at.... said these cakes would be cheaper! A real cake would cost me $2,500 and I want the fake version for $50!" - After 20 years in this industry trust me when I say they are out there.

In my experience so many faux cake makers charge less because they feel since it's a fake they shouldn't charge for their talent. All I was trying to say is that they should.

It's like a licensed home baker saying they shouldn't charge $3.50 a slice because they don't work out of a shop. I tell them the same thing I'm saying here "charge what you are worth".

My example of charging more for a fake was me thinking and not saying it's for the bride who doesn't want a return because she wants a one of a kind. That's why it's more, it lasts longer, the supplies cost more, and I will never be able to reuse it.

I am definately not anti faux cake in this industry. They have a perfect place in the cake world but I just wish that many decorators would see they don't have to price them dirt cheap because they are just selling themselves short.

Sorry to have offended.

Sugarshock Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:34am
post #9 of 18

Just thought you should know that a woman in Michigan that was on TV awhile ago is putting a patent on, I think, the rental aspect of the faux cake business. It says patent pending on her home page. She is offering franchising, though.

Sugarshock Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:35am
post #10 of 18

Duplicate post.

dsilvest Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 11:04am
post #11 of 18

I think the patent is for the little wedge opening in the styrofoam where you place a piece of cake.

Faux cakes have been around for years. My mother made them 40 years ago.

Sugarshock Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:28pm
post #12 of 18

dsilvest I hope your right. Anyone know how to find this out?

cakesweetiecake Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 4:40pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilvest

I think the patent is for the little wedge opening in the styrofoam where you place a piece of cake.

Faux cakes have been around for years. My mother made them 40 years ago.




I agree that faux cakes have been made for years. I cant imagine the patent being on the entire faux cake. I am surprised about the little wedge though. I've seen that done by other people, too. Interesting.

caketease Posted 29 Jul 2009 , 2:57am
post #14 of 18

Thank you all for responding to this post. I knew that I could count on my CC family to help me with this.

Thanks again,

Caketease

dsilvest Posted 30 Jul 2009 , 2:02am
post #15 of 18

Patent title: FAUX CAKE WITH EDIBLE PORTION
Inventors: Elaine Kimberly Aya

cakesweetiecake Posted 5 Aug 2009 , 7:43pm
post #16 of 18

This is posted on the company's website:

"We provide a service, where you can rent the beautifully designed centerpiece wedding cake.
The main cake is covered with real fondant with the looks and feel of a real cake in every aspect, however the inside is made of foam and there is small compartment to place a small portion of edible cake for the ceremony (design of the cake and the special shipping container are Patent Pending). With this patent we are the only company with the rights to a faux cake with and edible section. After the couple's "feeding each other" act, the display cake is taken back into the kitchen and the guests are served regular sheet cakes from the local bakery or wholesale store."

alidpayne Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 5:24am
post #17 of 18

Yeah, um, I think we have been doing the whole edible section thing around here for YEARS. I have seen that website before and thought yeah right.

Surely she doesn't REALLY think she was the first to think of that?

sara91 Posted 6 Aug 2009 , 5:28am
post #18 of 18

Craaaazy. I had a about a 80 year old teacher for baking and this is what they used to do back in the day.

It has been around a long time. Just have a look in many older cake decorating books from England and you will see how to make this technique.

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