Dealing With Responsibility

Decorating By ZlatkaT Updated 27 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm by leah_s

ZlatkaT Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:07pm
post #1 of 23

I am making a wedding cake for my friend, and talked with the people in the restaurant, where the reception will be. They are offering me a fridge, when I can put the cake in (perishible fillings). They will then move the cake on the table later. My friend thinks that is an good idea, but I don't feel comfortable with it - I am worried that after I leave, something could happen when somebody else will move my cake. I told my friend that I cannot be responsible if anything happened. She just laugh and said that I am to worried.

BUT how about if I would make a cake for customer and situation like this will appear, would you put this on contract or explain by mouth??

22 replies
minicuppie Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:14pm
post #2 of 23

Are you invited to the wedding? If not ..deliver and set up on one of the venues rolling carts...then escort the cake to a table and "supervise". Just a thought.

ZlatkaT Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:34pm
post #3 of 23

No, I am not invited, the cake is for my friend's daughter. The stuff of the restaurant knows the married couple as well, they will cut the cake, and offered a fridge to me, so the cake could be in a cool place.

JenniferMI Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:53pm
post #4 of 23

I would not want someone else moving my cake. Period.

Jen icon_smile.gif

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:15pm
post #5 of 23

My issue with coolers at restaurants is that they have alot of produce jsut sitting in there that is not covered and therefor all of the smells mingle. I would hate to take a bite of cake and have a smell or taste of brocolli. Just my 2 cents.

Deb_ Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:54pm
post #6 of 23

I agree with BeeBooss..........restaurant walk-ins are really NOT a safe place for an uncovered cake. Too many things could happen to it.

I'd either talk her out of the perishable filling or deliver the cake at the very last minute.

Yes, I do have in my contract that once the cake is "set up" I am not responsible if someone moves the table or knocks something into it causing damage to the cake.

I've never left a cake in a restaurant refrigerator nor will I (I can't sell perishable cakes anyway)

If she's not worried about it, then have her sign something that says she takes full responsibility for the cake and the staff that moves it. Maybe if you ask her to sign, she'll realize the risk involved.

Toptier Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 4:17pm
post #7 of 23

If you do this, put the cake in a box to protect it.

jenmat Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 6:38pm
post #8 of 23

how long is the cake really going to sit out? Most fillings won't perish after just a couple of hours. Especially inside the cake and then covered in icing. What are you putting into it?
I agree- cooler BIG no-no! Not only the smells- but the humidity can be terrible when people are going in and out of them. Just check with the bride and find out when guests will arrive. Deliver 1-2 hours before that and you're good to go.

ZlatkaT Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 7:22pm
post #9 of 23

The cake will be all Cream cheese with Bavarian fillings, and strawberries. The cake will be delivered at 4 pm, reception starts at 6 - so I guess after dinner etc, it might sit there for 4 hours (inside). Also the cake will be 2 days old (refrigerated). So the fridge sounds good for that reason, but I just don't feel comfortable somebody else will move it....

Kitagrl Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 7:38pm
post #10 of 23

I've had to do that a few times with surprise birthday cakes at restaurants or etc. I just have the restaurant person sign off on the cake when I deliver, and then whatever happens after that is not my fault.

So far so good.

jenmat Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 7:48pm
post #11 of 23

Even if you deliver the cake at 4pm, chances are the hall will be putting it out by 5pm when guests show up early, as they often do. So, one hour in exchange for you worrying all night about it is probably not worth it. Plus, if the cooler is moist, then you have to worry about the cake sweating just as the bride goes to see it. My vote is leave it out. I have had others move my cakes (out door receptions and such), and I have the stress free supports, so there haven't been any problems. But I always have someone sign a waiver- whether the bride or the hall. Good luck to you!

robinscakes Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 8:49pm
post #12 of 23

If she understands that something could happen to the cake and that's okay with her, then go with her wishes. Just make sure she understands. I have people who want to pick up their own wedding cakes to save money on delivery. I let them know that they're not easy to transport and anything could happen to them in the car or getting to the reception venue and that once it leaves the bakery it's their responsibility. Some people are fine with that. I've never heard about any of my cakes getting ruined, but if they did, it's not my problem if they agree to it and sign on the dotted line.

jlynnw Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 11:14pm
post #13 of 23

I would not like to do that! I am no so worried about a broccoli cake as much as garlic and onion! I would deliver the cake an hour later. At 5 o'clock start setting up the cake and you may have a few early birds in at that time, but so would the venue staff. The chances of the staff having the know how to set up the cake are slim and not worth the risk. Yes, they may sign off on it, it won't be your fault but it still will be your cake with funky smell/taste on the ground when things go wrong.

Merrygold Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 1:32am
post #14 of 23

I would not leave a cake unless someone took responsibility for it that was agreed upon by the person buying the cake. I would also get them to sign something. thumbs_up.gif
I just did a three tier grooms cake with chocolate mouse filling, ganache frosting and chocolate paste ribbons and flowers. It is summer in Michigan so it couldn't sit out for too long. Checked out the walk in cooler, no bad smells. Put the cake on a cart and rolled it in. Just before the bride and groom entered the grooms cake was placed in its spot. Easy to do with the cart. I could then leave and not worry about the cake because I had done what was agreed upon. The only concern with a cold cake is condensation. There was some on my flowers but it made them look fresh. icon_biggrin.gif

honeyscakes Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 3:01am
post #15 of 23

Whatever you decide to do...make sure you take a picture of the cake wherever you leave it...fridge or the cake table! take a digital camera with you,and make a 2 minute video of the cake at its location,stating the time and location of the cake icon_lol.gif
But ya! do take a picture of the cake so that you can prove the condition you left the cake in.
Good luck. thumbs_up.gif

honeyscakes Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 3:02am
post #16 of 23

Whatever you decide to do...make sure you take a picture of the cake wherever you leave it...fridge or the cake table! take a digital camera with you,and make a 2 minute video of the cake at its location,stating the time and location of the cake icon_lol.gif
But ya! do take a picture of the cake so that you can prove the condition you left the cake in.
Good luck. thumbs_up.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 3:23am
post #17 of 23

Ay yi yi. So many conditions on cake nowadays, eh? Speaking of responsibility, how about the responsibility that should be shown by a decorator for their cakes to last in conditions that are, ummmm, normal?? Not hitting you out on this OP, just something I've noticed lately. Namely, conditions that seem to warrant 15 pages of a contract (lighting, humidity levels, people breathing on cake-ok I made that one up).....ok, nevermind. icon_biggrin.gif

So, is there a reason why you have to deliver so early? Is this what they told you to do, or do you have to be somewhere and that's the only time you can take it?

Keep it in the fridge until delivery. Easy peasy. If your cake is well constructed, and the perishables are sealed inside nice and snug beneath layers of frosting (like 99.999 percent of cakes that I have ever seen....it'll be fine.

You may ignore my rantings and return to normal programming. icon_biggrin.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 3:24am
post #18 of 23

Oh. Cream cheese and strawberries. Hmmmm, I think I withdraw my previous comments. Either way, no I wouldn't want anyone moving my cake either. Nuh uh. I would figure out a way to deliver this as last minute as possible without walking in on the reception. icon_biggrin.gif

leah_s Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 2:22pm
post #19 of 23

Hold on. You're delivering the cake 2 DAYS before the wedding?

And everyone is right. if you are not familiar with a restaurant walk-inl you should go smell one. They pretty much all smell the same. It's a unique mingling of vegetables and foods, but not a nice place for cakes.

Bottom line here is that YOU are the expert and you have to do what is best for your product. YOU call the shots.

i would not agree to cream cheese in any event because I find it a nightmare to decorate with, and there is a fine alternative to Bavarian Creme that is shelf stable. Frankly, I would not serve Bavarian Creme (the real stuff) to the public when i was not in control of the product from the time I made it until the time I set it up. That is without a doubt a potentially hazardous food

ZlatkaT Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 2:32pm
post #20 of 23

[quote="leahs"]Hold on. You're delivering the cake 2 DAYS before the wedding?

And everyone is right. if you are not familiar with a restaurant walk-inl you should go smell one. They pretty much all smell the same. It's a unique mingling of vegetables and foods, but not a nice place for cakes.

NONO!!! I meant the cake would be 2 days old from baking. I am delivering the cake 2 hour before reception. Sorry my english was not clear icon_smile.gif

DeeDelightful Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 9:02pm
post #21 of 23

Can you deliver it later, closer to time for the reception?

ZlatkaT Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 10:06pm
post #22 of 23

Well, I probably will delivery 1 hour prior. I was just thinking, in case of accident/disaster, I will have 2 hours to get some other cake from store. This is my first tiered cake, delivered stacked. I should have all the knowledge of stacking etc, but never did it. Actually I made one practice cake, just two tiers, and drove around the town, and it was fine. But the thing with the fridge offered to me is still in my head. It would be good for the cake (as of the fillings), BUT the give the responsibility to the staff to move the cake is just not right with my feeling.
Thank you for ALL your opinion - it matters to me alot.

leah_s Posted 27 Jul 2009 , 10:31pm
post #23 of 23

If you're delivering stacked, please use SPS. It will be fine.

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