Transpoting Cake...need Advice

Decorating By savedbyhisgrace Updated 28 Jul 2009 , 2:10pm by savedbyhisgrace

savedbyhisgrace Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 1:31pm
post #1 of 16

I am new to making cakes this big and an nervous about transporting it. It's 3 tier with buttercream and I don't know if I should set it up there or stack it here and deliver. What are your suggestions, we are only going about 10 minutes from my house but my husbands driving scares me LOL

15 replies
Rylan Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 5:36pm
post #2 of 16

Go with whatever you are comfortable with. I personally would transport it stacked. I've transported 3 feet tall cakes in pedestal stands with no problems.

Like I always say, a reliable support system and proper driving are the keys to success.

If you are going to use the dowelling method, don't forget to put a center dowel--it will totally save you.

dogluvr Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 5:57pm
post #3 of 16

or you can try the SPS system...they are no fault...

kjt Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 6:31pm
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by savedbyhisgrace

we are only going about 10 minutes from my house but my husbands driving scares me LOL





icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
If you use the SPS method (go to the "How To" Forum, and read the sticky at the top that leahs posted for all the scoop on this), your cake will travel safely no matter how far, or WHO is doing the driving! Really...

Jennifer1970 Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 7:29pm
post #5 of 16

I always transport my cakes un-assembled. I'm too nervous about something falling apart! Much easier to carry into the venue in separate boxes, and set up there.

weirkd Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 12:18am
post #6 of 16

Yah, I agree with Jennifer also. I had a five tiered monster that I could of traveled with all put together but I would of never been able to carry the dang thing into the venue! As it was it took two of us on a rolling cart to get it in there and lift the booger!! But if you do, then go with the SPS system and center dowel.
Did anyone else see the new acrylic box thingy that Scott Clark Wooley is promoting on his site? It looked like it would work but I didnt know about the whole screwing the handle thingy threw the cake once its in there. What happens when you get it out? Do you leave it in there or do you have to try to get the thing out of the cake and have a huge hole in the center? Weird. Didnt get it. Also couldnt afford it! I dont think money is much of an object for him but I couldnt afford $500 for a cake box!!! (but thats just me)

kjt Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 12:25am
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by weirkd

But if you do, then go with the SPS system and center dowel.




The center dowel isn't used (or possible) when you use the SPS... thumbs_up.gif

patticakesnc Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 12:26am
post #8 of 16

I just transported my first wedding cake today fully assembled. I had to drive 2 hours to the site. It went fine. I had a 12-10-6 in stack. I used an sps between the 10-12 layers and just stacked the 6 in on top. I put 4 skewer size wooden dowels through the 6 and 10 in to keep it sturdy. I was scared to death but through the rough 2 hour drive it wend just fine.

jlynnw Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:08am
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjt

Quote:
Originally Posted by weirkd

But if you do, then go with the SPS system and center dowel.



The center dowel isn't used (or possible) when you use the SPS... thumbs_up.gif




Thanks, I was trying to figure out how to do that. DH wants to drill holes in my plates for center dowels. icon_surprised.gif

kjt Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 2:31am
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

Quote:
Originally Posted by kjt

Quote:
Originally Posted by weirkd

But if you do, then go with the SPS system and center dowel.



The center dowel isn't used (or possible) when you use the SPS... thumbs_up.gif



Thanks, I was trying to figure out how to do that. DH wants to drill holes in my plates for center dowels. icon_surprised.gif




icon_razz.gif that would take out the stabilizing little "nib"... but aren't hubbies - ummm -helpful...

jlynnw Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:04am
post #11 of 16

I just don't get why they try and improve a proven system, especially when they have no idea how it works to begin with icon_mad.gif

kjt Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:29am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

I just don't get why they try and improve a proven system, especially when they have no idea how it works to begin with icon_mad.gif




One of my favorite things that my DH says is, "I bet I can make it work" or,"Huh, I didn't think that would happen"! icon_confused.gif
You know, honey, just because you can tighten something until it breaks...all in all, tho, mine is awesome-even after 37 years, he's still the best! thumbs_up.gif

labmom Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:48am
post #13 of 16

Hi nervous time no matter how you stack it. But I have taken 4 tiere stacked over an hour away from our business.

I use "hidden" pillars in the cake so that the plates can sit and connect right into the cake. If you are using cake boards and doll rods, instead make sure that you use enough of them to support the tiers, and that the boards are not going to get soft from cake moisture. That is why cakes slip and slide.. nothing for the cakes to grip on.
And in the car, flat! I bought the rubber matting the kind that goes under carpets and place the cakes on that. Easy to clean if there is any frosting and no slips or slides. I have a pt cruiser so cakes fit great either with seats folded or in the flat back. But when i had my 95 chevy 4door.. I had a shelf built for the back seat. It had 2 legs that fit perfect on the floor and then the back I rollled the rubber mats so that the shelf was totaly level. Then put another mat on the shelf so nothing would slip.. it works great for everything not just cakes.

Also, if you have the chance get or make a sign for your car. My sign is magnetic and says caution: weddding cake on boardd.. fits accros the back of the pt and is bright yellow with red and black letters.

That way people stay off my tail and don't cuss me out when i take turns and railroad tracks at a snails pace. They know why!

But if you feel better putting the cake together at the venu, make sure you feel comfortable doing so with an audience. Sometimes the family is there and I always hate an audience. And sometimes the halls will not let you in until the last minute so there is no time to do set up there.

Best of luck in all your caked

bwydeli Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 4:15am
post #14 of 16

we transport our big cakes unassembled and stack onsite and do any finishing touches

savedbyhisgrace Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:02pm
post #15 of 16

Well, I did it and survived! Thanks for everyones advice....I used wiltons plastic supports and ran 4 dowels down throw the whole cake. I took it stacked because the event was right after church and I had to work in the nursery so no time to stack it there. It went off great.....everyone loved it and I was happy to be able to this at no charge. The momma to be is a friend and I wanted her to have something really special. She loved it, and I am glad it's over!

savedbyhisgrace Posted 28 Jul 2009 , 2:10pm
post #16 of 16

Well, I did it and survived! Thanks for everyones advice....I used wiltons plastic supports and ran 4 dowels down throw the whole cake. I took it stacked because the event was right after church and I had to work in the nursery so no time to stack it there. It went off great.....everyone loved it and I was happy to be able to this at no charge. The momma to be is a friend and I wanted her to have something really special. She loved it, and I am glad it's over!

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