Fondant Cookie Decoration

Baking By CNCS Updated 10 Aug 2009 , 2:09pm by tonedna

CNCS Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 1:17pm
post #1 of 14

how do you get the fondant to stick to the cookie and it not fall off?

Corn syrup or frosting?

13 replies
pinkflower1212 Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 3:57pm
post #2 of 14

I have read on here on CC and another site that they either use light corn syrup or a clear piping gel. i haven't tried fondant on a cookie yet so I am just passing along info I have read. Hopefully someone else with more experience will post and let us both know what is the best method.

Charmed Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 3:59pm
post #3 of 14

I just brush with a little bit of water.

verono Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 6:57pm
post #4 of 14

corn syrup with a little bit of water

mawagner Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 8:27pm
post #5 of 14

You can also put it on a warm cookie.

bobwonderbuns Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 12:25am
post #6 of 14

I use seived apricot preserves. Works like glue, adds a little extra flavor. Delicious! icon_biggrin.gif

happy1mom Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 2:40am
post #7 of 14

I've used one part light corn syrup to two parts water. Sticks like magic every time.

The preserves sounds like a great idea! Mmmmmm.......preserves...... icon_smile.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 31 Jul 2009 , 2:49am
post #8 of 14

Put it on the cookie as soon as it comes out of the oven, then take it off the cookie sheet. The heat of the cookie will bond the fondant to the cookie.

bobwonderbuns Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 3:01am
post #9 of 14

I'm just going to throw my $2.50 in here -- there are a lot of decorators who put the fondant on the cookie while it's still warm out of the oven, which is fine if you just do one piece of fondant quickly with no detail work. The problem lies in if you want to do more detailed work (like for example the Elizabethan cookies featured in this month's ACD magazine.) There is no possible way you can get that much fondant detailed onto a cookie while it's warm out of the oven -- and that's just one cookie! icon_eek.gif Not to mention the fact that sometimes the fondant will wrinkle and peel if it's not "just so" on the cookie (yes, sugar can be tempermental!) icon_confused.gif So in my opinion it's always better to have a glue under the fondant for all those reasons. [Disclaimer: this is merely my opinion on a technique, not a slam against anyone. Lots of decorators use this technique, I just think there's a better way.] End disclaimer. icon_biggrin.gif Hope that helps some! icon_biggrin.gif

linedancer Posted 7 Aug 2009 , 11:47am
post #10 of 14

I'm with bobwonderbuns on this one and as you say, not knocking anyone who does it right out of the oven. I really enjoy decorating cookies with fondant and want to take my time and make each cookie as perfect as I can. I also use light corn syrup mixed with water like happy1mom does. Never had the fondant come off this way and I do load my cookies up with detail.

kccinderella Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:38pm
post #11 of 14

It depends on the "look" I want. Sometimes I put the fondant on right-out-of-the-oven. Sometimes I use tylose diluted in water. I don't like to work with syrupy-stuff (if that's a word) and the tylose/water is easiest for me.

4theloveofcake Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:47pm
post #12 of 14

yep, light corn syrup mixed with water icon_wink.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 1:56pm
post #13 of 14

When you put it on right out of the oven, you can still add detail to it. At that point you would make any impressions in it that you wanted (for example indenting flower petals) before the fondant hardened. Then after all the cookies are done, add the other fondant to it just the way you would on a cake...with a little tylose and water or meringue powder and water as a glue. I don't think heat would attach several layers of fondant anyhow.

Also, you don't have to cut all the shapes right before you put them on. You can cut them ahead of time and lay them on waxed paper dusted with cornstarch. They'll dry a little bit but the heat still softens them enough to attach to the cookie, and they don't stretch when you pick them up.

But you should try both ways and pick the one that works best for you. I had tried the corn syrup first and it took ages to dry...actually my kids ate all the cookies before it ever dried icon_biggrin.gif...but I live in a humid area and don't have a wonderful air conditioner, so humidity even in the house is an issue for me.

tonedna Posted 10 Aug 2009 , 2:09pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

I'm just going to throw my $2.50 in here -- there are a lot of decorators who put the fondant on the cookie while it's still warm out of the oven, which is fine if you just do one piece of fondant quickly with no detail work. The problem lies in if you want to do more detailed work (like for example the Elizabethan cookies featured in this month's ACD magazine.) There is no possible way you can get that much fondant detailed onto a cookie while it's warm out of the oven -- and that's just one cookie! icon_eek.gif Not to mention the fact that sometimes the fondant will wrinkle and peel if it's not "just so" on the cookie (yes, sugar can be tempermental!) icon_confused.gif So in my opinion it's always better to have a glue under the fondant for all those reasons. [Disclaimer: this is merely my opinion on a technique, not a slam against anyone. Lots of decorators use this technique, I just think there's a better way.] End disclaimer. icon_biggrin.gif Hope that helps some! icon_biggrin.gif




I dont make that many cookies, but I agree with this too.. Just a little bit of water does it for me and I dont have to deal with a warm cookie and the fact that they might still be to soft to work with. Not that it cant be done, cause it can. Is a matter of preference..
Edna icon_smile.gif

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