My Shamwow Brilliant Idea!

Decorating By BeeBoos-8599_ Updated 26 Jul 2009 , 10:26pm by superstar

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 9:30pm
post #1 of 31

OK, Ladies and Gentlemen, here is your chance to contribute to the development of a new product for tiered cakes. This is going to be my shamwow for sure.

I read on here all of the time how people have a cake colapse or they want bubble straws and cannot find them or they cannot cut thier straws or dowels to a even hieght. I think I have a solution. This may be hard to describe so bare with me.

Imagine a plastic item that is shaped in a way that it WILL NOT tip and WILL NOT displace any cake so that you can just mark your tier and then slide this piece into the cake and it will not be able to tip over allowing the cake to colapse like a dowel can. It can come in 2 different ways the first being a set with various hieghts pre cut such as 2" 2.5" etc... you just decide the hieght you need to accomodate filling and icing and slide it in OR my hubbys thought is that it comes in long pieces probably 12" that are scored at various hieghts and you cut them to the hieght you need allowing you to get them all the exact same hieght every time.

The product can either come in food safe plastic and you can decide weather or not to have the client return them to you or you can consider them disposable.

I really think this can be a solution for those of us who cannot afford a stress free support system. I need your input.
1. What hieght would be best,
2. Do you want them pre cut or in strips?
3. What price would you pay for them?

I allready know what the shape will be but hubby is paranoid and wont let me tell you untill he has a "working prototype". hehehe.
And dont anyone try and take my retirement away from me by making it first. icon_wink.gif

30 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 10:10pm
post #2 of 31

Well....SPS is a good alternative already to Stress Free. I don't know. I guess I have no constructive input to add.

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 23 Jul 2009 , 11:51pm
post #3 of 31

Ok so you are talking about the plates and collumns right? Dont those displace the cake that you insert them into? Do you get them back or do you consider them a one time use product? I am just not sure how those differ from the dowels and straws that is unless they connect to the plates somehow. I am really curious can you explain what you like about using them?

__Jamie__ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 12:45am
post #4 of 31

They displace very little cake. Dowels, since they are a solid object, and thin and flimsy period, do displace cake. I use straws or SPS. Depends on my mood. And no, I don't get anything back. Ever. It is worked into the cost of the cake.

I like that it is a sturdy, dependable support system that is very easy to use. No marking and cutting dowels, no worrying about a leg being shorter and causing a cake to shift and fall. Very strong plates. You could go 10 tiers tall with these suckers.

I guess I am confused about how you would support a cake with zero cake displacement.

Unlimited Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 12:51am
post #5 of 31

It sounds exactly like the Single-Plate System. (there's a "sticky" on the How Do I forum to learn how to use the SPS very affordable setup.)

I'd buy the Shamwow part though!

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 2:19am
post #6 of 31

Unlimited, lol. No what I am thinking about is nothing like the sps. It would be shaped like < and would just slide right down into the cake. You would space them out under the tiers with the points going either inward or outward. I think they would be better if the point went outward. They dont really displace anything because they just slice into the cake. I just need to figure out the details such as sizes. I think they can be in smaller sizes for smaller tiers and larger for the larger tiers. I am thinking that having it come in strips that can be cut along score lines will offer the most flexability. I did find another support system on the net but I dont like the structure of it. Anyway, thanks for those who have given me some feedback.

Doug Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 2:28am
post #7 of 31
__Jamie__ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 2:45am
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

have you seen this site?

http://www.lauras-cakes.com/supports.htm




Hmmmm, at first I thought that was brilliant....but wouldn't that encourage the cake to split, or at least, if it was thinking about it, really get a violent shove towards going through with it?? If not....that's pretty cool!

cas17 Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 2:45am
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

have you seen this site?

http://www.lauras-cakes.com/supports.htm




i have never seen this before, has anyone ever tried it?

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 2:50am
post #10 of 31

Doug, That is the other system I was reffering to. WHat I dont like is that I think the one large piece would cause splitting of the cake and that the continual surface that the cake would be sitting on may increase the possability of sliding. Mine wold be individual pieces that you would insert just ike you do with straws, dowels etc just in a shape that cannot fall over and scored so you can determine not only the hieght but the length of each point. It is comming together more and more in my head.

Jamie, see it can be brilliant. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 3:46am
post #11 of 31

I can't envision how it will be wide enough not to tip over, yet won't displace any cake. icon_confused.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 5:00am
post #12 of 31

Visuals would help.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 12:19pm
post #13 of 31

Yeah I am working on visuals. If it is V shaped and has the right amount of angle to it- it wont tip and since it is only as thick as other plastic products currently being used but is actually flat there is more of a slicing then a displacement of cake. I will get visuals on today.

michellesArt Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 12:24pm
post #14 of 31

i don't think she'll give us visuals as that might give away too much-good luck with the prototype-i've gone to straws icon_smile.gif

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 1:18pm
post #15 of 31

Michellesart, I am working on it! I am having scanner issues. I know I said my hubby did not want me to give away to much but my last post said I would get visuals for you all. I have the drawing allready done.

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 3:23pm
post #16 of 31

OK, for some reason it will let me download the sketch to my photos but not to the forum. So, if you want to check there you can see what I have in mind. Again, and constructive criticism would be welcome.

** I dont know why it is not there either! UGHHH< I know it takes time for pics to show up maybe I am just being impatient.

BREN28 Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 3:59pm
post #17 of 31

what an interesting idea!! thumbs_up.gif

CanadianCakin Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 4:23pm
post #18 of 31

I think that looks great! Great idea! Good luck with the prototype! I look forward to getting them at the store!

I truely pray that someone does not 'swipe' the idea from you....I would p!ssed for you and we might have to lay the smack down!

Best of luck to you icon_smile.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 4:28pm
post #19 of 31

If you are serious about doing that, delete that picture you posted. icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 4:33pm
post #20 of 31

Oh now I understand!! That looks good.

Unlimited Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 4:45pm
post #21 of 31

I like it so much better than the "X" pattern plexi-glass one that actually slices the cake (almost to the degree of "serving").

It wouldn't support any more weight than a complete circle such as hollow tubes, and the "v" shape design would be tipsy in all directions (with the possible exception of the open end depending on how rigid the material is; very rigid--couldn't cut to size, not so rigid--could collapse over or bend).

It's been said that a 3 leg stool won't wobble, but it is more tipsy and unstable than a 4 leg stool. I see these open "v" shapes (or even closed "v" shapes) as a 3 leg stool... perhaps it won't wobble, but more unstable.

There is incredible strength in circular designs. I wouldn't want to reinvent the wheel (so to speak) on pillars... the Greek and Roman empires perfected the engineering on this thousands of years ago and the technology still used today is based on the same philosophy in so many tried and true applications.

__Jamie__ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 4:56pm
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

There is incredible strength in circular designs. I wouldn't want to reinvent the wheel (so to speak) on pillars... the Greek and Roman empires perfected the engineering on this thousands of years ago and the technology still used today is based on the same philosophy in so many tried and true applications.




Ooooooh, excellent observation. Yes.

indydebi Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 5:06pm
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

There is incredible strength in circular designs. I wouldn't want to reinvent the wheel (so to speak) on pillars... the Greek and Roman empires perfected the engineering on this thousands of years ago and the technology still used today is based on the same philosophy in so many tried and true applications.



Ooooooh, excellent observation. Yes.




And kids in school ask why do they have to learn history (which is my passion!).

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 6:56pm
post #24 of 31

Unlimited, I am not sure if you are a pro vote or not on the product. IMO the V shape makes it much more stable than a collumn. and If you just take a piece of paper (those stiff things in magazines work for the purpose of demonstration) and fold it in 2 then open it up a bit you will see that when sat on a counter if you apply pressure across the top it is very sturdy. I dont like dowels or collums or straws because they have no where to go when pressure is put on them and they leave a hole of displaced cake where you insert them. Now granted they are great to hold a building BUT and arch holds even better that is why they are used in bridges etc... this is just at more of an angle than the arch. As for the construction that is one thing I posted this for. I wanted the opinions of the people it would be designed for. I feel that if made out of plastic (similar to the plastic that the wilton wheel cutter that everyone hates) it is strong enough yet when scores are inprinted on it you atctually have a place to cut or bend it so that the pieces are the same size.

Unlimited Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 7:44pm
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeBoos-8599_

Unlimited, I am not sure if you are a pro vote or not on the product.




Perhaps so if you can convince me that an open "v" shape is more structurally sound than a completely enclosed space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeBoos-8599_

IMO the V shape makes it much more stable than a collumn. and If you just take a piece of paper (those stiff things in magazines work for the purpose of demonstration) and fold it in 2 then open it up a bit you will see that when sat on a counter if you apply pressure across the top it is very sturdy.




Those are fly cards, and perhaps a poor example. It's not sturdy at all, it bends and flexes at the open points which is where the weak point would be if applying enough pressure. If you enclose the open end to create a complete triangle, it would give the same support as round or square pillars. If you use an incomplete portion of a triangle shape it would have to be made of much thicker material than the other shapes to make up for the strength difference that it loses in comparision to the others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeBoos-8599_

arch holds even better that is why they are used in bridges etc... this is just at more of an angle than the arch.




An arch is also a circle. The weight is distributed evenly throughout the entire span of half of the circle shape.

You aren't comparing apples to apples in your comparison of more of an angle. I realize from your "bird's eye view" drawing looking down at the cake that your intention is to insert them into the cake with the opened end showing. If you alternatively "mean" to insert them with the open end facing down (which would totally destroy the cake structure), you could compare your design to a bridge support, but it would be a catastrophic design because it would then allow all of the weight to only be on the tip of the triangular shaped point putting pressure to collapse the legs outward if not connected, or bend in the middle of the legs if connected into the complete shape.

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 24 Jul 2009 , 8:15pm
post #26 of 31

No No No I do not want you to insert them with the open end facing down. I would agree that it would be catastrophic to do so. Weather you insert them in to the cake with the open end facing toward the middle of the cake or turned out I think would be up to the decorator. My original thought is that they would be set in as in the picture but the main reason I think they are better than a dowell or a collumn is that they cannot tip over like a dowell or collumn can do (not that I do not agree that the basic design of a complete circle is extremely strong) and not to displace cake or leave a hole in the cake (not that anyone has a problem with the hole that is left by the round supports). Again, the tipping over of a support is what I am trying to eleminate.

So, if I understand your consern, you feel that they could possibly spread out on the open end when pressure is put on them? I just want to be able to look at all of the objections and overcome them prior to production.

I really do apppreciate your input and willingness to challenge me. This is what will make the design successfull.

BlakesCakes Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 12:25am
post #27 of 31

I haven't been able to see a pic, but if I understand the written description, it's a ">" wedge and that the above tier will sit on on the upper leg endpoint??

Is this going to be inserted so that the lower leg sits flat on the cake board? If the lower leg doesn't come in full contact with the cake board, I see too little/few points of contact for stability.

How would one determine that it is level and not torqued after insertion?=

How will you prevent side-to-side sheer if the pieces aren't connected? I believe that's why Laura's is connected and forms a platform for the above tier. If they aren't perfectly vertical, they can still tip over, especially when weight or lateral forces are applied.

Having made slits in the cake, cutting could be an issue if the serving cuts don't align with the slits.

Just my thoughts. Good luck.
Rae

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 25 Jul 2009 , 8:25pm
post #28 of 31

Blakescakes, No it would not rest ont he ends. The V sits with the open ends pointing either in toward the center of the cake or pointing outward so the cake is actually resting on both sides of the V. The "slice" or slit it would make would not really be an issue when it came to serving the cake. Certainly less than the hole left by a dowell or collumn. I know it is hard to understand if you have not seen the picture but I was advised to remove the picture untill the patent process is complete (and what an expensive process this has turned out to be icon_eek.gif ). Anyway, thanks for the input and as soon as the product is complete I will post another picture and let anyone who is interested know how they can get thier own. I may need some people who would like to "test" them while in the development stage. icon_wink.gif

Just one thing I still would like some input on, If the product was to come in precut hieghts, what would you feel would be the 3 top sizes you would use? With pans comming in 2" and 3" and taking icing, fondant and filling into consideration. I am just not sure if having set sizes is the way to go since we are not dealing with a consistant product when talking about cake.

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 3:23pm
post #29 of 31

Why is there a star on the file for this post? I have seen it on other posts but never really wondered. Now it is on one of my posts.

Deb_ Posted 26 Jul 2009 , 5:08pm
post #30 of 31

A post is marked with a "star" when it generates a lot of "views" or interest.



My only concern with an open ended "V" is when the tier is placed on top of it, won't the weight of the tier cause the open end to open further which could end up with the cake collapsing?

It just seems like it would have too much "give" which isn't what we want in our support systems. I agree that "closing" the top of the "V" would make it more stable. (Maybe it is a "solid V" or solid triangle....IDK I didn't get to see the pic.)

Unless of course it's made of a very heavy gauge plastic or metal.

This is interesting, I hope you have success with it and I look forward to reading of your progress with it.

Good luck!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%